United Kingdom local elections, 2012

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United Kingdom local elections, 2012
United Kingdom
2011 ←
3 May 2012 → 2013

131 councils in England
all 32 councils in Scotland
21 of 22 councils in Wales
  First party Second party Third party
  Ed Miliband David Cameron Nick Clegg
Leader Ed Miliband David Cameron Nick Clegg
Party Labour Conservative Liberal Democrat
Leader since 25 September 2010 6 December 2005 18 December 2007
Last election 37%[1] 35%[1] 15%[1]
Popular vote 38% 31% 16%
Swing Increase 1% Decrease 4% Increase 1%
Councils 75 42 6
Councils +/– Increase 32 Decrease 12 Decrease 1
Councillors 2,159 1,006 431
Councillors +/– Increase 823 Decrease 405 Decrease 336

The 2012 United Kingdom local elections were held across England, Scotland and Wales on 3 May 2012.[2] Elections were held in 131 English local authorities, all 32 Scottish local authorities and 21 of the 22 Welsh unitary authorities, alongside three mayoral elections including the London mayoralty and the London Assembly. Referendums were also held in 11 English cities to determine whether or not to introduce directly elected mayors.[3]

All registered electors (British, Irish, Commonwealth and European Union citizens) who were aged 18 or over on Thursday 3 May 2012 were entitled to vote in the local elections. Those who were temporarily away from their ordinary address (for example, away working, on holiday, in student accommodation or in hospital) were also entitled to vote in the local elections,[4] although those who had moved abroad and registered as overseas electors cannot vote in the local elections. It is possible to register to vote at more than one address (such as a university student who had a term-time address and lives at home during holidays) at the discretion of the local Electoral Register Office, but it remains an offence to vote more than once in the same local government election.[5]

The deadline to register to vote in the election was midnight on Wednesday 18 April 2012,[6] though anyone who qualified as an anonymous elector had until midnight on Thursday 26 April 2012 to register.[7]

The Government have timetabled the inaugural election of crime and police commissioners for November 2012.[8][9][10]

Results[edit]

The Labour Party was seen as making strong progress across the country, by making gains in areas where the party had suffered losses at the General Election two years earlier. Their biggest prize was England's largest council, Birmingham, after ending eight years of Conservative-Liberal Democrat rule at City Hall. They also gained councils like Nuneaton & Bedworth, Southampton and Great Yarmouth from the Conservatives. Nuneaton & Bedworth had been seen as a sensational gain for the Conservatives in 2008 when Labour suffered nationally. Labour also won a clutch of seats from No Overall Control including Norwich and Chorley. In Wales and Scotland they were delighted to regain control of Cardiff and Glasgow, which are traditionally seen as heartlands for Labour.

The election was a bad showing for the Conservatives, who suffered their first major set of losses since coming to power in 2010. They suffered a backlash from voters after a badly received budget in March. Unlike 2011, their losses to Labour were not compensated by gains from their junior coalition partners, the Liberal Democrats. The party was unnerved to lose councils like Dudley to Labour, which was considered as natural middle-England territory necessary to winning a General Election. The Tories also suffered in their heartlands: in leafy West Oxfordshire they lost 4 seats to Labour, in Daventry 4 and in Peterborough they lost another 3. The only point of cheer for the party came when they gained Winchester from No Overall Control. In Wales they lost control of Monmouthshire and the Vale of Glamorgan, as well as dozens of seats in other councils.

The Liberal Democrats again suffered a huge setback across the country. They fell back heavily in northern cities where they had once made gains against Labour: in Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and their leader Nick Clegg's home city of Sheffield. Just a few years earlier, they ruled in three of the four cities. In intellectual Oxford and Cambridge, they lost yet more ground to Labour. In Cambridge they lost their majority, although narrowly remained the largest party. In Scotland they had been the largest party in the capital Edinburgh, where they held 16 seats prior to the election. Afterwards they were reduced a rump of just 3, and were now the smallest delegation at City Hall. Similarly in Wales, they handed victory to Labour in Cardiff after losing their comfortable majority in the capital by shedding more than half of the seats they were defending. By contrast they fared better in straight fights with the Conservatives than was the case in 2011. On the south coast in Portsmouth and Eastleigh, for example, they made small gains.

England[edit]

Map of the results following the elections in England. Black indicates a council in no overall control, whilst white indicates area where no elections took place.

Metropolitan boroughs[edit]

All 36 Metropolitan boroughs had one third of their seats up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Barnsley Labour Labour hold Details
Birmingham No overall control Labour gain Details
Bolton Labour Labour hold Details
Bradford No overall control No overall control hold (Labour Minority w/green support) Details
Bury Labour Labour hold Details
Calderdale No overall control No overall control hold Details
Coventry Labour Labour hold Details
Doncaster Labour Labour hold Details
Dudley Conservative Labour gain Details
Gateshead Labour Labour hold Details
Kirklees No overall control No overall control hold Details
Knowsley Labour Labour hold Details
Leeds Labour Labour hold Details
Liverpool Labour Labour hold Details
Manchester Labour Labour hold Details
Newcastle upon Tyne Labour Labour hold Details
North Tyneside Labour Labour hold Details
Oldham Labour Labour hold Details
Rochdale Labour Labour hold Details
Rotherham Labour Labour hold Details
St Helens Labour Labour hold Details
Salford Labour Labour hold Details
Sandwell Labour Labour hold Details
Sefton No overall control Labour gain Details
Sheffield Labour Labour hold Details
Solihull Conservative Conservative hold Details
South Tyneside Labour Labour hold Details
Stockport No overall control No overall control hold (Lib Dem Minority) Details
Sunderland Labour Labour hold Details
Tameside Labour Labour hold Details
Trafford Conservative Conservative hold Details
Wakefield Labour Labour hold Details
Walsall No overall control No overall control hold (Conservative Minority w/Lib Dem Support) Details
Wigan Labour Labour hold Details
Wirral No overall control Labour gain Details
Wolverhampton Labour Labour hold Details

Unitary authorities[edit]

Whole council up for election[edit]

Two unitary authorities that would usually have had a third of their seats up for election, actually had elections for all their seats because of the implementation of boundary changes.

Council Previous control Result Details
Hartlepool[11] Labour Labour hold Details
Swindon[12] Conservative Conservative hold Details

One third of council up for election[edit]

In 16 English unitary authorities, one third of the council was up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Blackburn with Darwen Labour Labour hold Details
Derby No overall control Labour gain Details
Halton Labour Labour hold Details
Kingston upon Hull Labour Labour hold Details
Milton Keynes No overall control No overall control hold Details
North East Lincolnshire No overall control Labour gain Details
Peterborough Conservative Conservative hold Details
Plymouth Conservative Labour gain Details
Portsmouth Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Reading No overall control Labour gain Details
Slough Labour Labour hold Details
Southampton Conservative Labour gain Details
Southend-on-Sea Conservative No overall control gain Details
Thurrock No overall control Labour gain Details
Warrington Labour Labour hold Details
Wokingham Conservative Conservative hold Details

District councils[edit]

Whole council up for election[edit]

Four district councils that would usually have had one-third of their seats due for election, actually had full council elections as a result of the implementation of new ward boundaries.

Council Previous control Result Details
Broxbourne[13] Conservative Conservative hold Details
Daventry[14] Conservative Conservative hold Details
Rugby[15] Conservative Conservative hold Details
Rushmoor[16] Conservative Conservative hold Details

Half of council up for election[edit]

7 district councils had half of their seats up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Adur Conservative Conservative hold Details
Cheltenham Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Fareham Conservative Conservative hold Details
Gosport Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hastings Labour Labour hold Details
Nuneaton and Bedworth No overall control Labour gain Details
Oxford Labour Labour hold Details

One third of council up for election[edit]

In 63 district authorities, one third of the seats were up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Amber Valley Conservative Conservative hold Details
Basildon Conservative Conservative hold Details
Basingstoke and Deane Conservative Conservative hold Details
Bassetlaw Labour Labour hold Details
Brentwood Conservative Conservative hold Details
Burnley No overall control Labour gain Details
Cambridge Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold (casting vote of the Mayor) Details
Cannock Chase No overall control Labour gain Details
Carlisle No overall control Labour gain Details
Castle Point Conservative Conservative hold Details
Cherwell Conservative Conservative hold Details
Chorley No overall control Labour gain Details
Colchester No overall control No overall control hold Details
Craven Conservative Conservative hold Details
Crawley Conservative Conservative hold Details
Eastleigh Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Elmbridge Conservative Conservative hold Details
Epping Forest Conservative Conservative hold Details
Exeter No overall control Labour gain Details
Gloucester Conservative No overall control gain Details
Great Yarmouth Conservative Labour gain Details
Harlow Conservative Labour gain Details
Harrogate Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hart Conservative No overall control gain Details
Havant Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hertsmere Conservative Conservative hold Details
Huntingdonshire Conservative Conservative hold Details
Hyndburn Labour Labour hold Details
Ipswich Labour Labour hold Details
Lincoln Labour Labour hold Details
Maidstone Conservative Conservative hold Details
Mole Valley No overall control No overall control hold Details
Newcastle-under-Lyme No overall control Labour gain Details
North Hertfordshire Conservative Conservative hold Details
Norwich No overall control Labour gain Details
Pendle No overall control No overall control hold Details
Preston Labour Labour hold Details
Purbeck No overall control No overall control hold Details
Redditch Conservative Labour gain Details
Reigate and Banstead Conservative Conservative hold Details
Rochford Conservative Conservative hold Details
Rossendale No overall control Labour gain Details
Runnymede Conservative Conservative hold Details
St Albans No overall control No overall control hold Details
South Cambridgeshire Conservative Conservative hold Details
South Lakeland Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Stevenage Labour Labour hold Details
Stratford-on-Avon Conservative Conservative hold Details
Stroud No overall control No overall control hold Details
Tamworth Conservative Conservative hold Details
Tandridge Conservative Conservative hold Details
Three Rivers Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Tunbridge Wells Conservative Conservative hold Details
Watford Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat hold Details
Welwyn Hatfield Conservative Conservative hold Details
West Lancashire Conservative Conservative hold Details
West Oxfordshire Conservative Conservative hold Details
Weymouth and Portland No overall control No overall control hold Details
Winchester No overall control Conservative gain Details
Woking Conservative Conservative hold Details
Worcester Conservative No overall control gain Details
Worthing Conservative Conservative hold Details
Wyre Forest Conservative No overall control gain Details

Mayoral elections[edit]

Three direct mayoral elections were held.

Local Authority Previous Mayor Mayor-elect Details
London Boris Johnson (Conservative) Boris Johnson (Conservative) Details
Salford[17] none Ian Stewart (Labour) Details
Liverpool[18] none Joe Anderson (Labour) Details

Mayoral referendums[edit]

Referendums were also held in 11 English cities to determine whether or not to introduce the position of a directly-elected mayor. These polls took place in Birmingham, Bradford, Bristol, Coventry, Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham, Sheffield and Wakefield.[3] Of these 11 cities, only Bristol chose direct election (rather than council appointment) of a mayor. In addition, the citizens of Doncaster voted on the same day to continue electing their mayors directly.

Scotland[edit]

Map of the control of Scottish councils following the 2012 council elections. Black indicates no overall control, red indicates majority Scottish Labour control, and yellow indicates majority Scottish National Party control.
Map of the largest party on each Scottish council following the 2012 council elections. Red indicates Scottish Labour, yellow Scottish National Party, white Independents and blue Scottish Conservatives. Patterned areas indicate a council where two parties have the same number of seats.

All council seats were up for election in the 32 Scottish authorities.

Council Previous control Result Details
Aberdeen City No overall control No overall control hold Details
Aberdeenshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Angus No overall control SNP gain Details
Argyll and Bute No overall control No overall control hold Details
Clackmannanshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Dumfries and Galloway No overall control No overall control hold Details
Dundee City No overall control SNP gain Details
East Ayrshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
East Dunbartonshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
East Lothian No overall control No overall control hold Details
East Renfrewshire No overall control No overall control Details
City of Edinburgh No overall control No overall control hold Details
Falkirk No overall control No overall control hold Details
Fife No overall control No overall control hold Details
Glasgow City Labour Labour hold Details
Highland No overall control No overall control hold Details
Inverclyde No overall control No overall control hold Details
Midlothian Labour No overall control gain Details
Moray No overall control No overall control Details
Na h-Eileanan Siar Independent Independent hold Details
North Ayrshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
North Lanarkshire Labour Labour hold Details
Orkney Independent Independent hold Details
Perth and Kinross No overall control No overall control hold Details
Renfrewshire No overall control Labour gain Details
Scottish Borders No overall control No overall control hold Details
Shetland Independent Independent hold Details
South Ayrshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
South Lanarkshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Stirling No overall control No overall control hold Details
West Dunbartonshire No overall control Labour gain Details
West Lothian No overall control No overall control hold Details

Wales[edit]

Map showing the results of the elections in Wales
Key:
  Labour control
  Independent control
  No election held

In 21 out of 22 Welsh authorities, the whole council was up for election. On 17 January 2012, the Welsh Government announced that elections for Anglesey council have been postponed to May 2013.[19]

Council Previous control Result Details
Blaenau Gwent No overall control Labour gain Details
Bridgend No overall control Labour gain Details
Caerphilly No overall control Labour gain Details
Cardiff No overall control Labour gain Details
Carmarthenshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Ceredigion No overall control No overall control hold Details
Conwy No overall control No overall control Details
Denbighshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Flintshire No overall control No overall control hold Details
Gwynedd Plaid Cymru No overall control gain Details
Merthyr Tydfil No overall control Labour gain
Monmouthshire Conservative No overall control gain
Neath Port Talbot Labour Labour hold
Newport No overall control Labour gain
Pembrokeshire Independent Independent hold
Powys Independent Independent hold
Rhondda Cynon Taff Labour Labour hold
Swansea No overall control Labour gain
Torfaen No overall control Labour gain
Vale of Glamorgan Conservative No overall control gain
Wrexham No overall control No overall control hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sparrow, Andrew (5 May 2011). "Election results 2011 - Thursday 5 May". The Guardian (London). 
  2. ^ "Local Elections 2012". Conservative Councillors Association. Retrieved 15 November 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Greg Clark: Date set for elected city mayors". Department of Communities and Local Government. 5 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "The Representation of the People (Form of Canvass) (England and Wales) Regulations 2006, Schedule Part 1". Legislation.gov.uk. 13 October 2011. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "I have two homes. Can I register at both addresses?". The Electoral Commission. Retrieved 5 January 2011. 
  6. ^ The deadline for the receipt of electoral registration applications is the eleventh working day before election day.
  7. ^ The deadline for the receipt and determination of anonymous electoral registration applications was the same as the publication date of the notice of alteration to the Electoral Register (i.e. the fifth working day before election day).
  8. ^ "No delay on police commissioners, says May". Epolitix. 9 May 2011. 
  9. ^ "Draft protocol for elected commissioners published". Home Office. 
  10. ^ Isaby, Jonathan (1 December 2010). "First elections for Police Commissioners set to take place in May 2012". torydiary. Conservativehome. 
  11. ^ "Hartlepool electoral review". Local Government Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  12. ^ "Forthcoming Elections - Swindon Borough Council". Swindon Borough Council. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  13. ^ "Broxbourne electoral review". Local Government Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  14. ^ "Daventry electoral review". Local Government Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  15. ^ "Rugby electoral review". Local Government Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 18 April 2012. 
  16. ^ Election News Summer 2011 - Rushmoor Borough Council[dead link]
  17. ^ "Salford referendum votes for directly elected mayor". BBC News. 27 January 2012. 
  18. ^ Bradbury, Sean (7 February 2012). "Liverpool Council passes motion to adopt elected mayor system". Liverpool Daily Post. 
  19. ^ "Anglesey council election postponed for year to 2013". BBC News. 17 January 2012. Retrieved 7 February 2012. Local government elections on Anglesey have been delayed for a year. It will mean people on the island will elect their new council in May 2013, 12 months later than in the rest of Wales.