United Kingdom railway station categories

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The 2,520 railway stations on the National Rail network in Great Britain are classified into six categories (two of which are each divided into two subcategories) by the Department for Transport. The scheme was devised in 1996[1] and there was a review in 2009 when 106 stations changed categories.[2] The categorisation scheme is owned by Network Rail, the site landlord of most of the stations.[1] Some stations are in more than one category, for instance St Pancras International's surface platforms are in category A and the Thameslink platforms are in category C1.

Categorisation scheme[edit]

Category Number (2011[3]) Description Trips per annum Example
A 28 National hub over 2 million Leeds
B 67 Regional interchange over 2 million Clapham Junction
C 1 2 248 Important feeder 0.5–2 million Manchester Oxford Road / Burgess Hill
D 298 Medium staffed 0.25–0.5 million Selly Oak
E 679 Small staffed under 0.25 million Balcombe
F 1 2 1,200 Small unstaffed under 0.25 million Fishersgate / Cooksbridge
Total 2,520

Category C stations are sub-divided into C1 (city or busy junction) and C2 (other busy railheads). Category F stations are sub-divided into F1 (basic) and F2 (below 100,000 journeys per annum).[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Part A: Consistent Standards". Better Rail Stations. Department for Transport. 2009. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Part D: Annexes". Better Rail Stations. Department for Transport. 2009. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Network RUS Stations". Network Route Utilisation Strategy, Stations. Network Rail. 2011. Retrieved 9 Jan 2013.