United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission

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United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission
Seal of the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission.png
Congressional commission overview
Headquarters Washington DC
Website http://www.uscc.gov/

The United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission is a congressional commission of the United States government. Created through a congressional mandate in October 2000, it is responsible for monitoring and investigating national security and trade issues between the United States and People's Republic of China.[1] The Commission holds regular hearings and roundtables, produces an annual report on its findings, and provides recommendations to Congress on legislative actions related to China.[2]

The twelve commissioners are appointed to two-year terms by the majority and minority leaders of the U.S. Senate, and by the minority leader and speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.[3]

Commissioners[edit]

As of 2012, commission members for the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission are as follows:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ § 1238 of Title XII of H.R. 5408, the "Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001", enacted by reference by Pub.L. 106–398, H.R. 4205, 114 Stat. 1654, enacted October 30, 2000, codified at 22 U.S.C. § 7002
  2. ^ United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission, "United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission".
  3. ^ United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission Fact Sheet