United States Ambassador to Argentina

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Ambassador of the United States to Argentina
Embajador de los Estados Unidos en Argentina
Department of state.svg
Seal of the United States Department of State
Incumbent
Kevin K. Sullivan
as Chargé d’Affaires

since July 4, 2013
Residence Bosch Palace
Nominator Barack Obama
Inaugural holder Caesar A. Rodney
as Minister Plenipotentiary
Formation December 27, 1823
Website U.S. Embassy - Buenos Aires

The United States Ambassador to Argentina is the official representative of the President of the United States to the head of state of Argentina.

Argentina had declared its independence from Spain in 1816 and there followed a series of revolutionary wars until 1861 when the nation was united. The United States recognized the government of Buenos Aires, the predecessor to Argentina, on January 27, 1823. Caesar Augustus Rodney was appointed as American Minister Plenipotentiary to Buenos Aires. Between 1854 and 1866, U.S. ambassadors were commissioned to the Argentine Confederation. Since 1867, ambassadors have been commissioned to the Argentine Republic.[1]

Diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Argentina were interrupted but not severed in June 1944 when the U.S. government recalled its ambassador in a dispute with the newly appointed dictator Edelmiro Julián Farrell. The U.S. government believed that Farrell was not committed to the defense of the Western Hemisphere against the Axis powers. Normal relations were resumed with the appointment of a new ambassador in April 1945 when Argentina declared war against Germany.[1]

The official residence of the U.S. Ambassador in Buenos Aires is the Bosch Palace, listed on the State Department's Register of Culturally Significant Property.[2]

Ambassadors and chiefs of mission[edit]

U.S. diplomatic terms


Career FSO
After 1915, The United States Department of State began classifying ambassadors as career Foreign Service Officers (FSOs) for those who have served in the Foreign Service for a specified amount of time.

Political appointee
A person who is not a career foreign service officer, but is appointed by the president (often as a reward to political friends).

Appointed
The date that the ambassador took the oath of office; also known as “commissioning”. It follows confirmation of a presidential appointment by the Senate, or a Congressional-recess appointment by the president. In the case of a recess appointment, the ambassador requires subsequent confirmation by the Senate.

Presented credentials
The date that the ambassador presented his letter of credence to the head of state or appropriate authority of the receiving nation. At this time the ambassador officially becomes the representative of his country. This would normally occur a short time after the ambassador’s arrival on station. The host nation may reject the ambassador by not receiving the ambassador’s letter, but this occurs only rarely.

Terminated mission
Usually the date that the ambassador left the country. In some cases a letter of recall is presented, ending the ambassador’s commission, either as a means of diplomatic protest or because the diplomat is being reassigned elsewhere and replaced by another envoy.

Chargé d'affaires
The person in charge of the business of the embassy when there is no ambassador commissioned to the host country. See chargé d'affaires.

Ad interim
Latin phrase meaning "for the time being", "in the meantime". See ad interim.
Bosch Palace, the residence of the U.S. Ambassador
  • Caesar A. Rodney[3]
    • Title: Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: January 27, 1823
    • Presented credentials: December 27, 1823
    • Terminated mission: Died at post, June 10, 1824
  • John M. Forbes[3]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: March 9, 1825
    • Presented credentials: August 20, 1825
    • Terminated mission: Died at post June 14, 1831
  • Francis Baylies[3]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: January 3, 1832
    • Presented credentials: June 15, 1832
    • Terminated mission: Left post September 26, 1832
  • William Brent, Jr.[3]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: June 14, 1844
    • Presented credentials: November 15, 1844
    • Terminated mission: Presented recall July 7, 1846
  • William A. Harris[4]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: February 19, 1846
    • Presented credentials: July 7, 1846
    • Terminated mission: Probably presented recall before September 12, 1851
  • John S. Pendleton[4]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: February 27, 1851
    • Presented credentials: September 12, 1851 or soon thereafter
    • Terminated mission: Relinquished charge from Montevideo, Uruguay March 31, 1854
  • William Henry Bissell[5]
    • Title: Chargé d'Affaires
    • Appointed: May 24, 1853
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —

Note: Beginning with Minister Peden, the office was upgraded to Minister Resident

  • James A. Peden[4]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: June 29, 1854
    • Presented credentials: December 1, 1854
    • Terminated mission: Presented recall December 1, 1858

Note: Minister Peden resided at Buenos Aires until about May 1, 1857, when he closed the Legation at that city and moved to Paraná, the capital of the Argentine Confederation. The U.S. Legation to the Argentine Confederation remained there until February 25, 1862, when Ambassador Palmer returned it to Buenos Aires, following reunification of the country.

  • Mirabeau B. Lamar[6]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: —
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —
  • Benjamin C. Yancey[4]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: June 14, 1858
    • Presented credentials: December 1, 1858
    • Terminated mission: Transmitted recall by note from Montevideo, Uruguay, September 30, 1859
  • John F. Cushman[4]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: July 18, 1859
    • Presented credentials: December 22, 1859
    • Terminated mission: Relinquished charge February 17, 1861

Note: Ambassador Palmer moved the U.S. Legation back from Paraná to Buenos Aires in 1862.

  • Robert M. Palmer[4]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: March 28, 1861
    • Presented credentials: October 5, 1861
    • Terminated mission: Left post about April 12, 1862
  • Robert C. Kirk[4]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: March 4, 1862
    • Presented credentials: June 21, 1862
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 26, 1866
  • Alexander Asboth[7][8]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: March 12, 1866
    • Presented credentials: October 20, 1866
    • Terminated mission: Died at post January 21, 1868
  • Henry G. Worthington[8]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: June 5, 1868
    • Presented credentials: September 11, 1868
    • Terminated mission: Presented recall July 8, 1869
  • Robert C. Kirk[8]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: April 16, 1869
    • Presented credentials: July 8, 1869
    • Terminated mission: Presented recall November 4, 1871
  • Julius White[9]
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: December 12, 1872
    • Presented credentials: May 6, 1873
    • Terminated mission: Left post November 14, 1873
  • Thomas O. Osborn
    • Title: Minister Resident
    • Appointed: February 10, 1874
    • Presented credentials: May 21, 1874
    • Terminated mission: Recommissioned as Minister Resident/Consul General July 7, 1884
  • Thomas O. Osborn[10]
    • Title: Minister Resident/Consul General
    • Appointed: July 7, 1884
    • Presented credentials: (previously presented May 21, 1874
    • Terminated mission: Probably presented recall on or before October 15, 1885
  • Bayless W. Hanna – Career FSO
    • Title: Minister Resident/Consul General
    • Appointed: June 17, 1885
    • Presented credentials: October 15, 1885
    • Terminated mission: Promoted to Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary July 1, 1887

Note: In 1887, during Hanna’s term, the office was upgraded to Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, which required a new appointment for Hanna.

  • Bayless W. Hanna[11]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 1, 1887
    • Presented credentials: February 15, 1888
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 8, 1889
  • John R. G. Pitkin[12]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 26, 1889
    • Presented credentials: October 31, 1889
    • Terminated mission: Left post August 15, 1893
  • William I. Buchanan
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: January 26, 1894
    • Presented credentials: May 19, 1894
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 11, 1899
  • William Paine Lord[13]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 16, 1899
    • Presented credentials: February 14, 1900
    • Terminated mission: Left post March 27, 1903
  • John Barrett[14]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 2, 1903
    • Presented credentials:
    • Terminated mission:
  • Arthur M. Beaupre
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: March 17, 1904
    • Presented credentials: June 17, 1904
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 2, 1908
  • Spencer F. Eddy
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 2, 1908
    • Presented credentials: August 27, 1908
    • Terminated mission: Left post January 2, 1909
  • Charles Hitchcock Sherrill
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 1, 1909
    • Presented credentials: June 30, 1909
    • Terminated mission: Left post September 16, 1910
  • Huntington Wilson[15]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: January 11, 1909
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —
  • Charles Hitchcock Sherrill
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 1, 1909
    • Presented credentials: June 30, 1909
    • Terminated mission: Left post September 16, 1910
  • John Ridgely Carter – Career FSO[16]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: August 12, 1911
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —
  • John W. Garrett – Career FSO
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: December 14, 1911
    • Presented credentials: February 29, 1912
    • Terminated mission: Left post November 22, 1913

Note: In 1914 the office of Envoy was upgraded to Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary.

  • Frederic Jesup Stimson – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 1, 1914
    • Presented credentials: January 8, 1915
    • Terminated mission: Left post April 21, 1921
  • John W. Riddle – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: November 18, 1921
    • Presented credentials: March 8, 1922
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 28, 1925
  • Peter Augustus Jay – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: March 18, 1925
    • Presented credentials: September 24, 1925
    • Terminated mission: Left post December 30, 1926
  • Robert Woods Bliss – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: February 17, 1927
    • Presented credentials: September 9, 1927
    • Terminated mission: Left post April 29, 1933
  • Alexander W. Weddell – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: June 3, 1933
    • Presented credentials: September 18, 1933
    • Terminated mission: Left post October 29, 1938
  • Norman Armour – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 18, 1939
    • Presented credentials: June 19, 1939
    • Terminated mission: Recalled June 27, 1944; left post June 29, 1944

Note: Normal relations between the U.S. and Argentina were interrupted Feb 24, 1944; the U.S. did not recognize the new government of Argentina and recalled Ambassador Armour on June 27, 1944. Relations were restored when the U.S. recognized the Farrell government on April 19, 1945.

Note: The name of the chargé d'affaires a.i. or other chief of mission who served in the interim between Ambassadors Armour and Braden is not recorded.

  • Spruille Braden – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 8, 1945
    • Presented credentials: May 21, 1945
    • Terminated mission: Left post September 23, 1945
  • George S. Messersmith – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 12, 1946
    • Presented credentials: May 23, 1946
    • Terminated mission: Left post June 12, 1947
  • James Bruce – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 12, 1947
    • Presented credentials: August 21, 1947
    • Terminated mission: Left post August 20, 1949
  • Stanton Griffis – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: September 22, 1949
    • Presented credentials: November 17, 1949
    • Terminated mission: Left post September 23, 1950
  • Ellsworth Bunker – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: March 13, 1951
    • Presented credentials: May 8, 1951
    • Terminated mission: Left post March 12, 1952
  • Albert F. Nufer – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 29, 1952
    • Presented credentials: August 14, 1952
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 12, 1956
  • Willard L. Beaulac – Career FSO[17]
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 10, 1956
    • Presented credentials: June 1, 1956
    • Terminated mission: Left post August 2, 1960
  • Roy R. Rubottom, Jr. – Career FSO[18]
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: August 27, 1960
    • Presented credentials: October 20, 1960
    • Terminated mission: Left post October 19, 1961
  • Robert M. McClintock – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: February 6, 1962
    • Presented credentials: February 14, 1962
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 10, 1964
  • Edwin M. Martin – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: January 29, 1964
    • Presented credentials: June 11, 1964
    • Terminated mission: Left post January 5, 1968
  • Carter L. Burgess – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 24, 1968
    • Presented credentials: August 21, 1968
    • Terminated mission: Left post March 14, 1969
  • John Davis Lodge – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 27, 1969
    • Presented credentials: July 23, 1969
    • Terminated mission: Left post November 10, 1973
  • Robert C. Hill – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: December 19, 1973
    • Presented credentials: February 15, 1974
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 10, 1977
  • Raul Hector Castro – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: September 15, 1977
    • Presented credentials: November 16, 1977
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 30, 1980
  • Harry W. Shlaudeman – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 2, 1980
    • Presented credentials: November 4, 1980
    • Terminated mission: Left post August 26, 1983
  • Frank V. Ortiz, Jr. – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: November 18, 1983
    • Presented credentials: November 29, 1983
    • Terminated mission: Left post August 29, 1986
  • Theodore E. Gildred – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 16, 1986
    • Presented credentials: November 6, 1986
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 31, 1989
  • Terence A. Todman – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 20, 1989
    • Presented credentials: June 13, 1989
    • Terminated mission: Left post June 28, 1993
  • James Richard Cheek – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 28, 1993
    • Presented credentials: July 19, 1993
    • Terminated mission: Left post December 18, 1996
  • Ronald D. Godard – Career FSO
    • Chargé d'Affaires a.i. December 1996–October 1997
  • Manuel Rocha – Career FSO
    • Chargé d'Affaires a.i. October 1997–July 2000
  • Hassan Nemazee – Political appointee[19]
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: —
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —
  • James Donald Walsh – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: June 14, 2000
    • Presented credentials: July 3, 2000
    • Terminated mission: Left post May 21, 2003
  • Lino Gutierrez – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: April 16, 2003
    • Presented credentials: October 15, 2003
    • Terminated mission: Left post April 8, 2006
  • Earl Anthony Wayne – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: August 1, 2006
    • Presented credentials: January 19, 2007
    • Terminated mission: April 6, 2009
  • Vilma Socorro Martínez – Political appointee
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: July 24, 2009
    • Presented credentials: September 18, 2009
    • Terminated mission: Incumbent

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Argentina". United States Department of State. Retrieved 2011-07-16. 
  2. ^ State Department: Register of Culturally Significant Property "Register of Culturally Significant Property" (pdf). United States Department of State. Retrieved 2011-07-16. 
  3. ^ a b c d Commissioned to the Republic of Buenos Aires.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Commissioned to the Argentine Confederation.
  5. ^ Bissel was appointed to the post of Chargé d'Affaires on May 24, 1853, during a recess of the Senate, but declined the appointment.
  6. ^ Lamar was commissioned during a recess of the Senate but did not serve under this appointment.
  7. ^ Beginning with Ambassador Asboth in 1866, all U.S. ambassadors were commissioned to the Argentine Republic.
  8. ^ a b c Between 1867 and 1870, the U.S. Ambassador to Argentina was concurrently commissioned to Uruguay, while resident in Buenos Aires.
  9. ^ White was commissioned during a recess of the Senate but declined reappointment during the next Congress.
  10. ^ Osborn was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on July 7, 1884.
  11. ^ Hanna was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on December 15, 1881.
  12. ^ Pitkin was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on January 9, 1890.
  13. ^ Lord was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on December 14, 1899.
  14. ^ Barrett was commissioned during a recess of the Senateand recommissioned after confirmation November 16, 1903.
  15. ^ Wilson took the oath of office on January 11, 1909 but did not proceed to post. Instead, he was appointed as Assistant Secretary of State.
  16. ^ Carter was appointed to the office on August 12, 1911 but did not serve under this appointment.
  17. ^ President Eisenhower nominated Beaulac July 17, 1953 to be Ambassador to Argentina, but the nomination was withdrawn before the Senate acted upon it. Beaulac was instead given a recess appointment as Ambassador to Chile. He was again nominated for the ambassadorship to Argentina in 1956.
  18. ^ Rubottom was commissioned during a recess of the Senate on July 29, 1960 but he declined the appointment.
  19. ^ President Clinton nominated Nemazee to the post on January 6, 1999, but the nomination was returned without action on August 5, 1999.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]