United States Ambassador to North Yemen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ambassador of the United States to North Yemen
Department of state.svg
Seal of the United States Department of State
Incumbent
None
Inaugural holder J. Rives Childs
as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
Formation August 22, 1946
Abolished June 13, 1991
North Yemen

The United States recognized the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen in 1946 and commissioned its first ambassador, J. Rives Childs to the Kingdom of Yemen on August 22, 1946. A diplomatic legation was established in Ta'izz. At that time the ambassador to Saudi Arabia was concurrently commissioned to Yemen while resident in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Following a coup d'état in North Yemen in 1962, the nation was renamed Yemen Arab Republic. A period of civil war ensued for the next five years. The United States maintained diplomatic relations with the Kingdom but no ambassador was accredited to the nation. A series of chargés d’affaires maintained the legation during that period. Also during that time, the legation in Ta'izz was raised to embassy status on January 28, 1963 and the embassy was transferred to San'a in 1966.

The Yemen Arab Republic severed relations with the United States June 7, 1967. A U.S. Interests Section was established in the Italian Embassy on April 10, 1970. The Embassy in San'a was re-established on July 1, 1972. The first Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, William R. Crawford, Jr., was appointed on October 12, 1972.

On May 22, 1990, the Yemen Arab Republic and the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (South Yemen) announced that they were forming a united Republic of Yemen.

For subsequent ambassadors to the Republic of Yemen, see United States Ambassador to Yemen.

For ambassadors to South Yemen, see United States Ambassador to South Yemen.

Ambassadors[edit]

U.S. diplomatic terms


Career FSO
After 1915, The United States Department of State began classifying ambassadors as career Foreign Service Officers (FSOs) for those who have served in the Foreign Service for a specified amount of time.

Political appointee
A person who is not a career foreign service officer, but is appointed by the president (often as a reward to political friends).

Appointed
The date that the ambassador took the oath of office; also known as “commissioning”. It follows confirmation of a presidential appointment by the Senate, or a Congressional-recess appointment by the president. In the case of a recess appointment, the ambassador requires subsequent confirmation by the Senate.

Presented credentials
The date that the ambassador presented his letter of credence to the head of state or appropriate authority of the receiving nation. At this time the ambassador officially becomes the representative of his country. This would normally occur a short time after the ambassador’s arrival on station. The host nation may reject the ambassador by not receiving the ambassador’s letter, but this occurs only rarely.

Terminated mission
Usually the date that the ambassador left the country. In some cases a letter of recall is presented, ending the ambassador’s commission, either as a means of diplomatic protest or because the diplomat is being reassigned elsewhere and replaced by another envoy.

Chargé d'affaires
The person in charge of the business of the embassy when there is no ambassador commissioned to the host country. See chargé d'affaires.

Ad interim
Latin phrase meaning "for the time being", "in the meantime". See ad interim.
  • Note: Until 1963 the embassy had the status of legation rather than embassy and the title of the ambassador was Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.
  • Note: Until 1957 the envoy was concurrently commissioned to the Kingdom of Yemen and Saudi Arabia, while resident at Jeddah.
  • J. Rives Childs – Career FSO[1]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: August 22, 1946
    • Presented credentials: September 30, 1946
    • Terminated mission: Left Jeddah, July 21, 1950
  • Raymond A. Hare – Career FSO
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: September 20, 1950
    • Presented credentials: July 22, 1951
    • Terminated mission: Left Jeddah, July 8, 1953
  • George Wadsworth – Career FSO[2]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 21, 1953
    • Presented credentials: September 13, 1954
    • Terminated mission: Left Jeddah, January 1, 1958
  • Note: In 1957 or 1958 (records unclear), the U.S. ambassador to Egypt was concurrently commissioned to Yemen while resident at Cairo.
  • Donald R. Heath – Career FSO[3][4]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: November 27, 1957
    • Presented credentials: —
    • Terminated mission: —
  • Raymond A. Hare – Career FSO[5]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: February 16, 1959
    • Presented credentials: March 11, 1959
    • Terminated mission: Left Cairo, December 18, 1959
  • G. Frederick Reinhardt – Career FSO
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: January 27, 1960
    • Presented credentials: April 28, 1960
    • Terminated mission: Left Cairo, May 6, 1961
  • Parker T. Hart – Career FSO[6]
    • Title: Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: May 20, 1961
    • Presented credentials: October 1, 1961
    • Terminated mission: Appointment terminated, September 27, 1962
  • Notes:
    • In 1962–1967 during a period of civil war in North Yemen, there was no ambassador or envoy commissioned to the Yemen Arab Republic. The Chargés d’Affaires ad interim 1962–1967 were:
      • Robert Stookey (1963)
      • James N. Cortada (February 1963–August 1964)
      • Lee Dinsmore (August 1964–June 1967)
    • The U.S. Legation was raised to Embassy status on January 28, 1963.
    • The embassy was moved to San'a in 1966.
    • The Yemen Arab Republic severed diplomatic relations with the United States June 7, 1967 and all U.S. diplomatic personnel were withdrawn.
    • A U.S. Interest Section was established in the Italian Embassy on April 10, 1970. Principal Officers were David W. McClintock (April 1970–February 1972) and Robert A. Stein (February–July 1972).
    • The Embassy in San'a was re-established on July 1, 1972, with Robert A. Stein as Chargé d'Affaires ad interim.
    • From 1972 the ambassador had the rank of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary and was commissioned to the Yemen Arab Republic.
  • William R. Crawford, Jr. – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: October 12, 1972
    • Presented credentials: December 19, 1972
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 6, 1974
  • Thomas J. Scotes – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: December 20, 1974
    • Presented credentials: January 21, 1975
    • Terminated mission: Left post April 24, 1978
  • George M. Lane – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: August 11, 1978
    • Presented credentials: October 5, 1978
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 4, 1981
  • David E. Zweifel – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: September 28, 1981
    • Presented credentials: October 24, 1981
    • Terminated mission: Left post June 20, 1984
  • William Arthur Rugh – Career FSO
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: September 21, 1984
    • Presented credentials: October 28, 1984
    • Terminated mission: Left post July 4, 1987
  • Note: The post was vacant July 1987–August 1988. Theodore H. Kattouf served as Chargé d'Affaires ad interim in that interval.
  • Charles Franklin Dunbar – Career FSO[7]
    • Title: Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
    • Appointed: June 16, 1988
    • Presented credentials: August 14, 1988
    • Terminated mission: Left post June 13, 1991

On May 22, 1990, the Yemen Arab Republic and the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen united to form the "Republic of Yemen." For ambassadors to the Republic of Yemen, see United States Ambassador to Yemen.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Childs was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on January 13, 1947.
  2. ^ Wadsworth was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned after confirmation on January 26, 1954.
  3. ^ Heath took the oath of office, but did not present credentials in Yemen. He did serve in Saudi Arabia.
  4. ^ Heath was commissioned during a recess of the Senate and recommissioned on January 27, 1958.
  5. ^ After Hare’s departure from Yemen following presentation of his credentials, Legation Ta'izz was opened to the public effective March 16, 1959, with Charles B. Ferguson as Chargé d’Affaires ad interim.
  6. ^ Hart was concurrently accredited to Kuwait and Saudi Arabia while resident at Jeddah.
  7. ^ Dunbar was renominated on January 27, 1988, an earlier nomination not having been acted upon by the Senate.

References[edit]