United States Department of Energy International Energy Storage Database

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The United States Department of Energy's International Energy Storage Database (IESDB), is a free-access database of energy storage projects and policies funded by the U.S. DOE, Office of Electricity and Sandia National Labs.[1]

Goal[edit]

The goal of the database is to create an international public resource that raises awareness of energy storage systems by providing an accurate reflection of the various applications, technologies, and economic feasibility of energy storage systems that are currently in use and under construction on a global scale within various applications. By highlighting the changes within the energy industry, particularly within energy storage system feasibility the website is designed to improve the public's understanding of energy storage systems role in the energy industry.

Database as a Market Cited Resource for Energy Storage[edit]

The U.S. DOE's International Storage Database is increasingly becoming a market research resource that has been quoted by legislative bodies, opening testimonies, and as a citation source for reports related to energy storage.

Sample Database Use Cases[edit]

“The framework includes a plan to procure 1.325 GW of energy storage in California by 2020. California is set to increase energy storage capacity six fold from its current 35 MW, according to the US Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Database.”[2]

Quoted in the opening testimony of Douglas E. Davie on Behalf of Wellhead Electric Company, Inc. “The third-party verified Department of Energy (“DOE”) Energy Storage Database lists six operational transmission level interconnected 3 energy storage projects (excluding pumped hydro) providing frequency regulation, five providing voltage support and four projects with durations greater than four hours.”[3]

Used as a source in a news article on the pros and cons of energy storage. “This DOE database contains 409 projects from 34 countries. The total represents 121,89GW of energy storage. The aim is to track all energy storage projects worldwide within the next year.“[4]

Used as a citation source for more information regarding Energy Storage North America’s 12 finalists for their ESNA Innovation Awards.[5]

Energy Storage Use Cases Explained[edit]

  • Black start - A black start is the process of restoring a power station to operation without relying on the external electric power transmission network.
  • Distributed Upgrade Due to Solar
  • Distributed Upgrade Due to Wind
  • Electric Bill Management - Energy storage used by end-use customers in a variety of facets to reduce electric bills.
  • Electric Bill Management with Renewables - Energy storage used by end-use customers in a number of facets, and in conjunction with renewable generation resources, to reduce electric bills.
  • Electric Energy Time Shift - Energy time shift involves storing energy during low price times, and discharging during high price times.
  • Electric Supply Capacity - Depending on the circumstances in a given electric supply system, energy storage could be used to defer and/or to reduce the need to buy new central station generation capacity and/or to ‘rent’ generation capacity in the wholesale electricity marketplace.
  • Electric Supply Reserve Capacity - Non Spinning - Generation capacity that may be offline, or that comprises a block of curtailable and/or interruptible loads, and that can be available within 10 minutes. Unlike spinning reserve capacity, non-spinning reserve capacity is not synchronized with the grid (frequency). Non-spinning reserves are used after all spinning reserves are online.
  • Electric Supply Reserve Capacity - Spinning - Generation capacity that is online but unloaded and that can respond within 10 minutes to compensate for generation or transmission outages. ‘Frequency-responsive’ spinning reserve responds within 10 seconds to maintain system frequency. Spinning reserves are the first type used when a shortfall occurs.
  • Frequency Regulation - Frequency regulation involves moment-to-moment reconciliation of the supply of electricity and the demand for electricity. The reconciliation is done every few seconds. So at any given moment, if electricity demand exceeds supply then the supply is increased to meet demand. And, if demand is less than supply then the supply is decreased.
  • Grid Connected Commercial (Reliability & Quality) - The electric reliability application entails use of energy storage to provide highly reliable electric service. In the event of a complete power outage lasting more than a few seconds the storage system provides enough energy to a) ride through outages of extended duration or b) to complete an orderly shutdown of processes, c) transfer to on-site generation resources. The electric power quality application involves use of energy storage to protect loads downstream against short duration events which affect the quality of power delivered to the load. Some manifestations of poor power quality include: • variations in voltage magnitude, (e.g., short-term spikes or dips, longer-term surges, or sags) • variations in the primary 60 cycles/sec frequency at which power is delivered • low power factor (voltage and current excessively out of phase with each other) • harmonics, (i.e., the presence of currents or voltages at frequencies other than the primary frequency) • interruptions in service, of any duration, from a fraction of a second to minutes
  • Grid Connected Residential (Reliability) - The electric reliability application entails use of energy storage to provide highly reliable electric service. In the event of a complete power outage lasting more than a few seconds the storage system provides enough energy to a) ride through outages of extended duration or b) to complete an orderly shutdown of processes, c) transfer to on-site generation resources.
  • Load Following (Tertiary Balancing) - Load following resources’ output changes in response to the changing balance between electric supply (primarily generation) and end user demand (load) within a specific region or area, over timeframes ranging from minutes to a few hours.
  • On-Site Power
  • Onsite Renewable Generation Shifting - Energy storage to perform renewables energy time-shifting for end-use customers that generate renewable power onsite.
  • Ramping - Changing the loading level of a Generating Unit in a constant manner over a fixed time (e.g., Ramping up or Ramping down). Such changes may be directed by a computer or manual control.
  • Renewables Capacity Firming - Centralized or distributed Electric Energy Time Shifting specifically related to the uncontrollable nature of renewable generation.
  • Renewables Energy Time Shift - Use of storage to mitigate rapid output changes from renewable generation due to: a) wind speed variability affecting wind generation and b) shading of solar generation due to clouds. It is important because these rapid output changes must be offset by other “dispatchable” generation.
  • Stationary Transmission/Distribution Upgrade Deferral - The T&D Upgrade Deferral benefit is related to the use of a relatively small amount of modular storage to: a) defer the need to replace or to upgrade existing T&D equipment or b) to increase the equipment’s existing service life (life extension). Storage for T&D equipment life extension is especially compelling for the aging fleet of underground circuits which are quite expensive to replace or to upgrade. Those circuits’ life can be extended by: a) reducing the number of ground faults and/or b) reducing loading such that operating temperature is reduced, which reduces degradation of the insulation.
  • Transmission Congestion Relief - In many areas, transmission systems are becoming congested during periods of peak demand, driving the need and cost for more transmission capacity and increased transmission access charges. Additionally, transmission congestion may lead to increased use of congestion charges or locational marginal pricing (LMP) for electric energy. Storage can be used to avoid congestion-related costs and charges. In this application, storage systems are installed at locations that are electrically downstream from the congested portion of the transmission system. Energy is stored when there is no transmission congestion, and discharged (during peak demand periods) to reduce transmission capacity requirements.
  • Transmission Support - Energy storage used for transmission support improves T&D system performance by compensating for electrical anomalies and disturbances such as voltage sag, unstable voltage, and sub-synchronous resonance. The result is a more stable system with improved performance (throughput). Benefits from transmission support are highly situation-specific and site-specific.
  • Transmission update due to solar
  • Transmission update due to wind
  • Transportable Transmission/Distribution Upgrade Deferral - The T&D Upgrade Deferral benefit is related to the use of a relatively small amount of modular storage to: a) defer the need to replace or to upgrade existing T&D equipment or b) to increase the equipment’s existing service life (life extension). Storage for T&D equipment life extension is especially compelling for the aging fleet of underground circuits which are quite expensive to replace or to upgrade. Those circuits’ life can be extended by: a) reducing the number of ground faults and/or b) reducing loading such that operating temperature is reduced, which reduces degradation of the insulation. Transportable systems can be moved to where they are needed most on the grid.
  • Voltage Support - To manage "reactance" at the grid system level, grid system operators rely on an ancillary service called ‘voltage support’. The purpose of voltage support is to offset reactive effects so that grid system voltage can be restored or maintained. "Reactance" occurs because equipment that generates, transmits, or uses electricity often has or exhibits characteristics like those of inductors and capacitors in an electric circuit.
  • Transportation Services

See Technologies Listed in Database[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Energystorageexchange.org
  2. ^ Nancy Skinner. Nancy Skinner Representing the 15th District. California Assemblymember Nancy Skinner Applauds First-in-Nation Energy Storage Plan. http://www.asmdc.org/members/a15/california-assemblymember-nancy-skinner-applauds-first-in-nation-energy-storage-plan. California State Assembly Democratic Caucus, 17 Oct. 2013. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
  3. ^ Opening Testimony of Douglas E. Davie on Behalf of Wellhead Electric Company, Inc., 6 (2013) (testimony of Douglas E. Davie). Print.
  4. ^ Siegel, RP. "The Pros and Cons of Energy Storage Systems." Triple Pundit RSS. Triple Pundit, 25 Feb. 2013. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.
  5. ^ "Best of Energy Storage: Top 12 Finalists Announced for ESNA Innovation Awards." Energy Storage North America || September 30 – October 2, 2014 || San Jose Convention Center || San Jose, California || Awards. Energy Storage North America, 30 Sept. 2013. Web. 18 Oct. 2013.

http://www.energystorageexchange.org/projects

External links[edit]