California's 50th congressional district

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"CA-50" redirects here. For California State Route 50, see U.S. Route 50 in California.
California's 50th congressional district
California's 50th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
California's 50th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Duncan D. Hunter (RLakeside)
Ethnicity 58.6% White, 2.3% Black, 5.1% Asian, 29.9% Hispanic, 4.0[1]% other
Cook PVI R+14

California's 50th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California based in San Diego County. The district from 2003 to 2013 consisted of the northern coastal region of San Diego County and includes the suburbs of San Marcos, Carlsbad, Encinitas, Solana Beach, and Escondido.

The district is currently represented by Republican Duncan D. Hunter. The district was shifted slightly in the current redistricting to include Fallbrook, San Marcos, Valley Center, Escondido, Santee, Lakeside, and mountain and desert areas stretching to the Imperial County line.

History[edit]

44th District[edit]

In the 1980s, California's 44th Congressional District was one of four that divided San Diego. The district had been held for eight years by Democrat Jim Bates and was considered the most Democratic district in the San Diego area. However, Bates became bogged down in a scandal involving charges of sexual harassment. Randy "Duke" Cunningham won the Republican nomination and hammered Bates about the scandal. Cunningham won by just a point, meaning that the San Diego area was represented entirely by Republicans for only the second time since the city was split into three districts after the 1960 U.S. Census. Upon his victory, Cunningham changed his official residence from his Del Mar home to a condominium in the Mission Valley neighborhood in San Diego, as he was required to reside in the district that he represented in Congress.

41st District[edit]

In the 1980s, California's 41st congressional district was another of four that divided San Diego. The northern San Diego County district had been held for 12 years by Republican Bill Lowery and was considered the most Republican district in the San Diego area. Most of the district became the California's 51st congressional district after the 1990 U.S. Census. In 1992, Cunningham campaigned against Lowery in Lowery's district in the Republican primary. The new 51st District was much more conservative than Cunningham's more urban, old 41st District farther south. Lowery, who was tainted by the House check kiting scandal, lost the primary to Cunningham, who billed himself as honest, with his campaign theme of "A Congressman We Can Be Proud Of." Cunningham changed his official residence back to his Del Mar home in the old 41st/new 51st District after winning.

2000s[edit]

In the 2000 U.S. Census, most of the 51st District became the California's 50th congressional district. The district was gerrymandered to exclude the relatively liberal, coastal areas of La Jolla, Bird Rock, downtown La Jolla, and the University of California, San Diego areas. Those areas were moved to the more liberal California's 53rd congressional district, and Clairemont was added to the current 50th district. The more conservative, inland portions of La Jolla were kept within the 50th district.

Voting[edit]

Election results from statewide races
Year Office Results
2010 Governor[2] Whitman 55.2 - 39.8%
Senator[3] Fiorina 55.2 - 39.8%
2008 President[4] Obama 51.3 - 47.1%
2006 Governor[5] Schwarzenegger 69.9 - 26.3%
Senator[6] Feinstein 50.8 - 45.2%
2004 President[7] Bush 55.2 - 43.9%
Senator[8] Jones 48.2 - 48.1%
2003 Recall[9][10] Yes 68.0 - 32.0%
Schwarzenegger 63.1 - 20.3%
2002 Governor[11] Simon 55.6 - 37.3%
2000 President[12] Gore 59.0 - 37.2%
Senator[13] Feinstein 64.4 - 27.8%
1998 Governor
Senator
1996 President
1994 Governor
Senator
1992 President Clinton 48.8 - 30.0%
Senator Boxer 49.8 - 39.0%
Senator Feinstein 54.5 - 35.6%

List of representatives[edit]

Representative Party Dates Electoral history Counties
District created January 3, 1993
Bob Filner portraitsmall.jpg Bob Filner Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2003
First elected in 1992
Re-elected in 1994
Re-elected in 1996
Re-elected in 1998
Re-elected in 2000
Redistricted to the 51st district
San Diego
(southern suburbs)
Duke Cunningham.jpg Duke Cunningham Republican January 3, 2003 –
December 1, 2005
Redistricted from the 51st district and re-elected here in 2004
Re-elected in 2004
Resigned
San Diego
(northern suburbs)
Vacant December 1, 2005 –
June 13, 2006
Brian Bilbray.jpg Brian Bilbray Republican June 13, 2006 –
January 3, 2013
First elected to finish Cunningham's term
Re-elected in 2006
Re-elected in 2008
Re-elected in 2010
Redistricted to the 52nd district and lost
Duncan D. Hunter, official photo portrait, 111th Congress.jpg Duncan D. Hunter Republican January 3, 2013 –
Redistricted from the 52nd district
Re-elected in 2012
inland San Diego
(Escondido and Santee)

Election results[edit]

1992[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1992[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Filner 77,293 56.6%
Republican Tony Valencia 39,531 28.9%
Libertarian Barbara Hutchinson 15,489 11.3%
Peace and Freedom Roger Bruce Batchelder 4,250 3.1%
No party Pickard (write-in) 63 0.1%
Totals 136,626 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

1994[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1994[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Filner (incumbent) 59,214 58.90%
Republican Mary Alice Acevedo 36,955 32.50%
Libertarian Richardo Duenez 3,326 3.18%
Peace and Freedom Guillermo Ramirez 3,002 2.87%
Green Kip Krueger 1,954 1.87%
Totals 118,340 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

1996[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1996[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Filner (incumbent) 73,200 58.9%
Republican Jim Baize 38,351 32.5%
Reform Dan Clark 3,253 2.7%
Natural Law Earl Shepard 6,573 1.8%
Libertarian Philip Zoebisch 1,398 1.1%
Totals 118,340 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

1998[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 1998[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Filner (incumbent) 77,354 99.18%
No party Jon Parungoa (write-in) 596 0.77%
Republican Petra E. Barajas (write-in) 41 0.05%
Totals 77,991 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

2000[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2000[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Filner (incumbent) 95,191 68.3%
Republican Bob Divine 38,526 27.7%
Libertarian David A. Willoughby 3,472 2.4%
Natural Law LeAnn S. Kendall 2,283 1.6%
Totals 139,472 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

2002[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2002[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Duke Cunningham (inc.) 111,095 64.4%
Democratic Del G. Stewart 55,855 32.3%
Libertarian Richard M. Fontanesi 5,751 3.3%
Totals 172,701 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2004[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2004[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Duke Cunningham (inc.) 169,025 58.5%
Democratic Francine Busby 105,590 36.5%
Green Gary M. Waayers 6,504 2.2%
American Independent Diane Templin 4,723 1.6%
Libertarian Brandon C. Osborne 3,486 1.2%
Totals 289,328 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2006 (Special)[edit]

Representative Cunningham resigned on November 28, 2005, as a result of a bribery scandal. An open special election was held on April 11, 2006. The top vote getter was Democrat Francine Busby, who won 44% of the vote. The second place finisher was Republican Brian Bilbray, who won 15% of the vote. Paul King was the top Libertarian party vote getter, with 0.6% of the vote. Since no candidate received a simple majority, the top vote-getters in each party competed in a runoff or special general election on June 6, 2006 (the same day as the statewide California primary). Bilbray was sworn in on June 13, based on unofficial counts, two weeks before the election was certified. As a consequence of this action, a court challenge to the election results filed by voters was denied on jurisdictional grounds.[21] This decision is being appealed.

California 50th congressional district special election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Bilbray 64,554 49.5%
Democratic Francine Busby 59,021 45.3%
Independent William Griffith 4,846 3.7%
Libertarian Paul King 1,995 1.5%
Totals 134,302 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2006[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Bilbray (incumbent) 118,018 53.2%
Democratic Francine Busby 96,612 43.5%
Libertarian Paul King 4,119 1.8%
Peace and Freedom Miriam E. Clark 3,353 1.5%
Totals 222,102 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2008[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Bilbray (incumbent) 157,502 50.24%
Democratic Nick Leibham 141,635 45.18%
Libertarian Wayne Dunlap 14,365 4.58%
Totals 313,502 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2010[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2010[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Bilbray (incumbent) 142,236 56.65%
Democratic Francine Busby 97,813 38.96%
Libertarian Lars B. Grossmith 5,546 2.21%
Peace and Freedom Miriam E. Clark 5,470 2.18%
Totals 251,065 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2012[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections, 2012[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Duncan D. Hunter (incumbent) 174,838 67.7%
Democratic David B. Secor 83,455 32.3%
Totals 258,293 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

References in popular culture[edit]

On November 29, 2005, Stephen Colbert of Comedy Central's The Colbert Report declared on his show that the 50th Congressional District was "dead" to him after its insufficient support for his "friend" Duke Cunningham. Colbert placed the district on the show's ever-changing "Dead to Me" board, saying that he now considered the number of congressional districts in the United States to be 434. The number became 433 when he retired the 22nd District of Texas and sent it up to the rafters. However, on June 8, 2006, the eve of Tom DeLay's leaving Congress, Colbert returned the district to the board with a satirical "tribute" to DeLay, followed by a fake interview segment made from spliced-together clips of three interviews DeLay had done in the past. Colbert put the district back into retirement at the end of the segment. On March 1, 2006, he "downgraded" the 50th District's status from "dead to me" to "never existed to me."[26]

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°4′11″N 117°10′54″W / 33.06972°N 117.18167°W / 33.06972; -117.18167