United States House of Representatives elections, 1804

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United States House of Representatives elections, 1804
United States
1802 ←
April 24, 1804 - August 5, 1805
→ 1806

All 142 seats to the United States House of Representatives
72 seats were needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  NC-Congress-NathanielMacon.jpg John Cotton Smith engraving.png
Leader Nathaniel Macon John Cotton Smith
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Leader's seat North Carolina-6th Connecticut-AL
Last election 103 39
Seats won 114 28
Seat change Increase 11 Decrease 11

Speaker before election

Nathaniel Macon
Democratic-Republican

Elected Speaker

Nathaniel Macon
Democratic-Republican

Elections to the House of Representatives for the 9th Congress were held at various dates in each state between April 24, 1804 (in New York) and August 5, 1805 (in Tennessee). The Congress first met on December 2, 1805. The elections occurred at the same time as President Thomas Jefferson's re-election.

Under Jefferson's popular administration, his party continued to gain seats in the House. Territorial acquisitions from the Louisiana Purchase and economic expansion gave voters a positive view of the Democratic-Republicans, whose majority, already commanding in the 8th Congress, now surpassed three-quarters of the total membership. Following this election, Federalists were able to secure few seats outside of New England and party legitimacy deteriorated as political thought turned away from Federalist ideals perceived to be elitist and anti-democratic.

Election summaries[edit]

114 28
Democratic-Republican Federalist
State Type Date Total
seats
Democratic-
Republican
Federalist
Seats Change Seats Change
Connecticut At-large September 17, 1804 7 0 Steady 7 Steady
Delaware At-large October 2, 1804 1 0 Decrease1 1 Increase1
Georgia At-large October 2, 1804 4 4 Steady 0 Steady
Kentucky District (6) August 6, 1804 6 6 Steady 0 Steady
Maryland District (8[1]) October 1, 1804 9 7 Increase1 2 Decrease1
Massachusetts District (17) November 5, 1804 17 10 Increase3 7 Decrease3
New Hampshire At-large August 27, 1804 5 0 Steady 5 Steady
New Jersey At-large November 6–7, 1804 6 6 Steady 0 Steady
New York District (16[1]) April 24–26, 1804 17 15 Increase3 2 Decrease3
North Carolina District (12) August 10, 1804 12 12 Increase1 0 Decrease1
Ohio At-large October 9, 1804 1 1 Steady 0 Steady
Pennsylvania District (11[2]) October 9, 1804 18 17 Decrease1 1 Increase1
Rhode Island At-large August 28, 1804 2 2 Steady 0 Steady
South Carolina District (8) October 8–9, 1804 8 8 Increase2 0 Decrease2
Vermont District (4) September 4, 1804[3] 4 2 Increase1 2 Decrease1
1805 elections
Tennessee District[4] (3) August 4–5, 1805 3 3 Steady 0 Steady
Virginia District (22) April, 1805 22 21 Increase3 1 Decrease3
Total 142 114
80.3%
Increase11 28
19.7%
Decrease11
House seats
D-R
  
80.28%
Federalist
  
19.72%

Complete returns[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Connecticut at-large
7 seats on a general ticket
Benjamin Tallmadge Federalist 1801 (special) Re-elected Calvin Goddard (F) 15.1%
Samuel W. Dana (F) 14.9%
John Davenport (F) 14.4%
Roger Griswold (F) 14.4%
Benjamin Tallmadge (F) 13.3%
John Cotton Smith (F) 11.4%
Jonathan O. Moseley (F) 10.8%

Timothy Pitkin[5] (F) 3.1%
Lewis B. Sturges[5] (F) 0.7%
Theodore Dwight[5] (F) 0.5%
Others 1.4%
Simeon Baldwin Federalist 1803 (special) Retired
Federalist hold
John Cotton Smith Federalist 1800 Re-elected
Roger Griswold Federalist 1794 Re-elected
Calvin Goddard Federalist 1801 (special) Re-elected
John Davenport Federalist 1798 Re-elected
Samuel W. Dana Federalist 1796 Re-elected

Griswold and Goddard resigned before the start of the 9th Congress and were replaced by Timothy Pitkin (F) and Lewis B. Sturges (F). In August, 1806, John C. Smith (F) resigned and was replaced by Theodore Dwight (F)

Delaware[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Delaware at-large Caesar A. Rodney Democratic-Republican 1802 Lost re-election
Federalist gain
James A. Bayard (F) 52.1%
Caesar A. Rodney (DR) 47.9%

James A. Bayard (F) resigned before the start of the 9th Congress having been elected to the Senate. A special election was held to replace him, which elected James M. Broom (F)

Georgia[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Georgia at-large
4 seats on a general ticket
Peter Early Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Peter Early (DR) 24.2%
David Meriwether (DR) 22.9%
Joseph Bryan (DR) 21.3%
Cowles Mead (DR) 10.9%

Thomas Spalding (DR) 10.5%
Thomas Carr 6.7%
Obadiah Jones 2.4%
Thomas U.P. Charlton 1.2%
David Meriwether Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Joseph Bryan Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Samuel Hammond Democratic-Republican 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold

Initially, Cowles Mead (DR) was declared the winner of the 4th seat. The votes from Camden, Liberty and Tatnal counties were not received in time and were originally not counted. When it was later decided to count them as valid, it resulted in Thomas Spalding (DR) overtaking Cowles Mead for the fourth and final seat by 39 votes. Spalding was then given the seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in place of Mead.[6]

There were two subsequent vacancies. The first was caused by Joseph Bryan (DR) resigning in 1806. A special election was held to replace him which elected Dennis Smelt (DR). The second was caused by Thomas Spalding (DR) resigning later that same year. He was replaced by William W. Bibb (DR).

Kentucky[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Kentucky 1 Matthew Lyon Democratic-Republican 1796[7]
1803
Re-elected Matthew Lyon[8] (DR)
Samuel Hopkins
Kentucky 2 John Boyle Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected John Boyle[8] (DR)
Kentucky 3 Matthew Walton Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Matthew Walton[8] (DR)
Kentucky 4 Thomas Sandford Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Thomas Sandford[8] (DR)
Kentucky 5 John Fowler Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected John Fowler (DR) 61.9%
Benjamin Howard (DR) 38.1%
Kentucky 6 George M. Bedinger Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected George M. Bedinger (DR) 70.1%
Robert H. Grayson (DR) 17.6%
Philemon Thomas (DR) 12.3%

Maryland[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[9]
Maryland 1 John Campbell Federalist 1801 Re-elected John Campbell (F) 99.6%
Maryland 2 Walter Bowie Democratic-Republican 1802 (special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Leonard Covington (DR) 52.0%
Archibald Van Horne (DR) 46.8%
Clement Hill (F) 1.1%
Maryland 3 Thomas Plater Federalist 1801 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Patrick Magruder (DR) 56.0%
Thomas Plater (F) 44.0%
Maryland 4 Roger Nelson Democratic-Republican 1804 (special) Re-elected Roger Nelson (DR) 98.5%
Maryland 5
Plural district with 2 seats
Nicholas R. Moore Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Nicholas R. Moore (DR) 50.9%
William McCreery (DR) 46.3%

Robert Goodloe Harper (F) 1.8%
Others 1.0%
William McCreery Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected
Maryland 6 John Archer Democratic-Republican 1801 Re-elected John Archer (DR) 100%
Maryland 7 Joseph H. Nicholson Democratic-Republican 1798 (special) Re-elected Joseph H. Nicholson (DR) 99.6%
Maryland 8 John Dennis Federalist 1796 Retired
Federalist hold
Charles Goldsborough (F) 56.6%
Henry Waggaman (DR) 43.4%

A vacancy occurred in the 7th district when Joseph H. Nicholson (DR) resigned March 1, 1806. A special election was held which elected Edward Lloyd (DR) in his place.

Massachusetts[edit]

The majority requirement was met in all 17 districts in the 1804 elections

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[9]
Massachusetts 1
Known as the Suffolk district
William Eustis Democratic-Republican 1801 Lost re-election
Federalist gain
Josiah Quincy (F) 51.0%
William Eustis (DR) 49.0%
Massachusetts 2
Known as the Essex South district
Jacob Crowninshield Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Jacob Crowninshield (DR) 58.7%
Nathan Read (F) 41.2%
Massachusetts 3
Known as the Essex North district
Manasseh Cutler Federalist 1801 Retired
Federalist hold
Jeremiah Nelson (F) 56.8%
Thomas Kitteridge (DR) 43.2%
Massachusetts 4
Known as the Middlesex district
Joseph Bradley Varnum Democratic-Republican 1794 Re-elected Joseph Bradley Varnum (DR) 71.5%
Timothy Bigelow (F) 28.0%
Massachusetts 5
Known as the Hampshire South district
Thomas Dwight Federalist 1803 Retired
Federalist hold
William Ely (F) 62.9%
Samuel Fowler (DR) 36.7%
Massachusetts 6
Known as the Hampshire North district
Samuel Taggart Federalist 1803 Re-elected Samuel Taggart (F) 69.3%
Solomon Snead (DR) 30.5%
Massachusetts 7
Known as the Plymouth district
Nahum Mitchell Federalist 1803 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Joseph Barker (DR) 60.4%
Nahum Mitchell (F) 38.3%
Others 1.3%
Massachusetts 8
Known as the Barnstable district
Lemuel Williams Federalist 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Isaiah L. Green (DR) 60.1%
Lemuel Williams (F) 39.4%
Massachusetts 9
Known as the Bristol district
Phanuel Bishop Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Phanuel Bishop (DR) 62.2%
Nicholas Tillinghast (F) 30.8%
Josiah Deane (DR) 3.4%
John Bowers (F) 3.4%
Massachusetts 10
Known as the Worcester South district
Seth Hastings Federalist 1801 (special) Re-elected Seth Hastings (F) 51.2%
Edward Bangs (DR) 48.8%
Massachusetts 11
Known as the Worcester North district
William Stedman Federalist 1803 Re-elected William Stedman (F) 60.8%
John Whiting (DR) 39.0%
Massachusetts 12
Known as the Berkshire district
Simon Larned Democratic-Republican 1804 (special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Barnabas Bidwell (DR) 59.7%
Daniel Dewey (F) 40.3%
Massachusetts 13
Known as the Norfolk district
Ebenezer Seaver Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Ebenezer Seaver (DR) 64.6%
Thomas B. Adams (F) 35.0%
District of Maine Massachusetts 14
Known as the York district
Richard Cutts Democratic-Republican 1801 Re-elected Richard Cutts (DR) 51.9%
Joseph Leland (F) 31.4%
Daniel Cleaves 16.7%
Massachusetts 15
Known as the Cumberland district
Peleg Wadsworth Federalist 1792 Re-elected Peleg Wadsworth (F) 63.8%
William Widgery (DR) 19.1%
Isaac Parsons (DR) 17.1%
Massachusetts 16
Known as the Lincoln district
Samuel Thatcher Federalist 1802 (special) Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Orchard Cook (DR) 54.6%
Samuel Thatcher 45.4%
Massachusetts 17
Known as the Kennebec district
Phineas Bruce Federalist 1803 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
John Chandler (DR) 64.5%
Benjamin Whitwell (F) 35.5%

New Hampshire[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New Hampshire at-large
5 seats on a general ticket
Silas Betton Federalist 1802 Re-elected Samuel Tenney (F) 10.4%
David Hough (F) 10.4%
Thomas W. Thompson (F) 10.4%
Silas Betton (F) 10.4%
Caleb Ellis (F) 10.4%

Nahum Parker (DR) 9.7%
Ezra Bartlett (DR) 9.6%
Thomas Cogswell (DR) 9.6%
Clement Storer (DR) 9.6%
Jedediah K. Smith (DR) 9.6%
Samuel Hunt Federalist 1802 Retired
Federalist hold
Samuel Tenney Federalist 1800 Re-elected
David Hough Federalist 1802 Re-elected
Clifton Clagett Federalist 1802 Retired
Federalist hold

New Jersey[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New Jersey at-large
6 seats on a general ticket
Adam Boyd Democratic-Republican 1803 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Henry Southard (DR) 16.6%
Ebenezer Elmer (DR) 16.6%
John Lambert (DR) 16.6%
William Helms (DR) 16.6%
James Sloan (DR) 16.4%
Ezra Darby (DR) 16.4%

Aaron Ogden (F) 0.2%
Peter DeVroom (F) 0.2%
Franklin Davenport (F) 0.1%
James H. Imlay (F) 0.1%
Lambert Cadwalader (F) 0.1%
William Colfax (F) 0.1%
Ebenezer Elmer Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected
William Helms Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected
James Mott Democratic-Republican 1800 Retired
Federalist hold
Henry Southard Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected
James Sloan Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected

The Federalist ticket was announced only a week before the election, with no active campaigning

New York[edit]

New York held elections for the 9th Congress on April 24–26, 1804. For this year and the next election year, the 2nd and 3rd districts had combined returns, effectively a plural district with 2 seats, though still numbered as separate districts. At the time, District 2 consisted of only part of New York County, while District 3 consisted of the remainder of New York County plus Kings and Richmond Counties. By consolidating the two, it ensured that New York County would be combined into a single district.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New York 1 Incumbent John Smith (DR) was elected to the Senate Democratic-Republican hold. Eliphalet Wickes (DR) 35.8%
Samuel Riker[10] (DR) 35.6%
Joshua Smith (F) 28.6%
New York 2/3
Joint ticket
Joshua Sands Federalist 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Samuel L. Mitchill (DR) 27.8%
Daniel D. Tompkins (DR) 27.7%

Nicholas Fish (F) 22.3%
Wynandt Van Zandt (F) 22.2%
Samuel L. Mitchill Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected
New York 4 Philip Van Courtlandt Democratic-Republican 1793 Re-elected Philip Van Courtlandt (DR) 64.8%
John Herring (DR) 35.2%
New York 5 Andrew McCord Democratic-Republican 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Blake, Jr. (DR) 63.1%
David M. Westcott (F) 36.9%
New York 6 Daniel C. Verplanck Democratic-Republican 1803 (special) Re-elected Daniel C. Verplanck (DR) 58.0%
Benjamin Akin (F) 42.0%
New York 7 Josiah Hasbrouck Democratic-Republican 1803 (special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Martin G. Schuneman (DR) 60.0%
Gerrit Abeel (F) 40.0%
New York 8 Henry W. Livingston Federalist 1802 Re-elected Henry W. Livingston (F) 54.8%
Edward P. Livingston (DR) 45.2%
New York 9 Killian Van Rensselaer Federalist 1800 Re-elected Killian Van Rensselaer (F) 56.4%
David McCarty (DR) 43.6%
New York 10 George Tibbits Federalist 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Josiah Masters (DR) 55.4%
Jonathan Brown (F) 44.6%
New York 11 Beriah Palmer Democratic-Republican 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Peter Sailly (DR) 100%
New York 12 David Thomas Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected David Thomas (DR) 70.3%
Reuben Skinner (F) 29.7%
New York 13 Thomas Sammons Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Thomas Sammons (DR) 100%
New York 14 Erastus Root Democratic-Republican 1802 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican hold
John Russell (DR) 85.8%
Benjamin Gilbert (F) 6.0%
Solomon Martin (F) 3.6%
Erastus Root (DR) 3.6%
Thomas R. Gold (F) 1.0%
New York 15 Gaylord Griswold Federalist 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Nathan Williams (DR) 57.4%
Thomas R. Gold (F) 42.6%
New York 16 John Paterson Democratic-Republican 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Uri Tracy (DR) 62.8%
Edward Edwards (F) 37.2%
New York 17 Oliver Phelps Democratic-Republican 1802 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Silas Halsey (DR) 40.4%
Nathaniel W. Howell (F) 37.5%
Joseph Grover (DR) 11.2%
Peter Hughes (DR) 10.8%

A special election to fill the vacancy in the 1st district in the 8th Congress was held at the same time as the election for the 9th Congress. Unusually, a single election was held for both the seat in the 9th Congress and the remainder of the 8th Congress, with the individual receiving the highest number of votes being elected to the 9th Congress and the individual with the second-highest number of votes being elected to the remainder of the 8th Congress.

Daniel D. Tompkins (DR) of the 2nd/3rd district was appointed on July 2, 1804 to the New York Supreme Court. A special election was held in September, 1804 to replace him, electing Gurdon S. Mumford (DR).

Samuel L. Mitchill (DR), also of the 2nd/3rd district, resigned November 22, 1804 after being elected to the Senate, and a special election was held to replace him, elecing George Clinton, Jr. (DR).

North Carolina[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[9]
North Carolina 1 Thomas Wynns Democratic-Republican 1802 (special) Re-elected Thomas Wynns[8] (DR)
Thomas Harvey
North Carolina 2 Willis Alston Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Willis Alston (DR) 66.6%
John Binford (F) 20.7%
William R. Davie (F) 12.7%
North Carolina 3 William Kennedy Democratic-Republican 1803 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican hold
Thomas Blount (DR) 51.4%
William Kennedy (DR) 48.6%
North Carolina 4 William Blackledge Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected William Blackledge (DR) 96.6%
John Stanly (F) 3.4%
North Carolina 5 James Gillespie Democratic-Republican 1793
1803
Re-elected James Gillespie (DR) 52.5%
Benjamin Smith (F) 40.2%
Samuel Ashe (DR) 7.3%
North Carolina 6 Nathaniel Macon Democratic-Republican 1791 Re-elected Nathaniel Macon (DR) 99.9%
North Carolina 7 Samuel D. Purviance Federalist 1803 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Duncan McFarlan (DR) 36.8%
Joseph Pickett (F) 31.7%
William Martin (F) 31.1%
North Carolina 8 Richard Stanford Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Richard Stanford[11] (DR)
Duncan Cameron
Archibald Murphey
John Hinton, Jr.
North Carolina 9 Marmaduke Williams Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Marmaduke Williams (DR) 98.9%
Theophilus Lacey (DR) 1.0%
North Carolina 10 Nathaniel Alexander Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Nathaniel Alexander[8] (DR)
North Carolina 11 James Holland Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected James Holland (DR) 100%
North Carolina 12 Joseph Winston Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Joseph Winston (DR) 57.0%
Meshack Franklin (DR) 43.0%

In the 5th district, James Gillespie (DR) died on January 5, 1805, before the start of the 10th Congress, a special election was held for his replacement which elected Thomas Kenan (DR)

In the 10th district, Nathaniel Alexander (DR) resigned upon being elected Governor of North Carolina and was replaced in a special election by Evan S. Alexander (DR)

Ohio[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Ohio at-large Jeremiah Morrow Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Jeremiah Morrow (DR) 70.2%
Elias Langham (F) 29.4%
Rufus Putnam 0.4%

Pennsylvania[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[12]
Pennsylvania 1
Plural district with 3 seats
Joseph Clay Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Joseph Clay (DR) 33.6%
Jacob Richards (DR) 31.7%
Michael Leib (DR) 18.0%

William Penrose (DR) 16.7%
Jacob Richards Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Michael Leib Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected
Pennsylvania 2
Plural district with 3 seats
Robert Brown Democratic-Republican 1798 (Special) Re-elected John Pugh (DR) 32.2%
Frederick Conrad (DR) 31.7%
Robert Brown (DR) 21.8%

John Ross (Quid) 13.0%
Samuel Preston (Quid) 1.3%
Frederick Conrad Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Isaac Van Horne Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Pennsylvania 3
Plural district with 3 seats
Isaac Anderson Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Christian Lower (DR) 33.1%
John Whitehill (DR) 23.0%
Isaac Anderson (DR) 22.9%

Thomas Boude (F) 10.7%
Isaac Wayne (F) 10.3%
Joseph Hiester Democratic-Republican 1797 (Special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Whitehill Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Pennsylvania 4
Plural district with 2 seats
John A. Hanna Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected David Bard (DR) 34.6%
John A. Hanna (DR) 31.2%

Oliver Pollock (DR) 18.1%
Robert Mitchell (DR) 16.1%
David Bard Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected
Pennsylvania 5 Andrew Gregg Democratic-Republican 1791 Re-elected Andrew Gregg (DR) 100%
Pennsylvania 6 John Stewart Democratic-Republican 1800 Lost re-election
Federalist gain
James Kelly (F) 58.5%
John Stewart (DR) 41.5%
Pennsylvania 7 John Rea Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected John Rea (DR) 100%
Pennsylvania 8 William Findley Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected William Findley (DR) 64.7%
John Brandon (F) 35.3%
Pennsylvania 9 John Smilie Democratic-Republican 1792
1798
Re-elected John Smilie (DR) 100%
Pennsylvania 10 William Hoge Democratic-Republican 1801 (Special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Hamilton (DR)
John Israel (F)[13]
Pennsylvania 11 John Lucas Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected John Lucas (DR) 64.8%
James O'Hara (F) 35.2%

John Lucas (DR), re-elected to the 11th district, resigned before the start of the 9th Congress. A special election was held for his replacement, electing Samuel Smith (DR).

On July 23, 1805, before the first meeting of the 9th Congress, John A. Hanna (DR) of the 4th district died. A special election was held to fill the vacancy, electing Robert Whitehill (DR).

Finally, on February 14, 1806, Michael Leib (DR) of the 1st district resigned and was replaced in a special election by John Porter (DR)

Rhode Island[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[9]
Rhode Island at-large
2 seats on a general ticket
Nehemiah Knight Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Nehemiah Knight (DR) 49.9%
Joseph Stanton, Jr. (DR) 49.5%
Joseph Stanton, Jr. Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected

South Carolina[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
South Carolina 1
Also known as the Charleston district
Thomas Lowndes Federalist 1800 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Robert Marion (DR) 60.6%
Thomas L. Smith (F) 37.0%
Scattering 2.4%
South Carolina 2
Also known as the Beaufort and Edgefield district
William Butler, Sr. Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected William Butler, Sr.[8] (DR)
South Carolina 3
Also known as the Georgetown district
Benjamin Huger Federalist 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
David R. Williams (DR) 58.0%
Robert Witherspoon (DR) 29.0%
Joseph Blyth (DR) 13.0%
South Carolina 4
Also known as the Orangeburgh district
Wade Hampton Democratic-Republican 1803 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
O'Brien Smith[8] (DR)
John Taylor (DR)
South Carolina 5
Also known as the Sumter district
Richard Winn Democratic-Republican 1802 (special) Re-elected Richard Winn[8] (DR)
John Kershaw
South Carolina 6
Also known as the Abbeville district
Levi Casey Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Levi Casey[8] (DR)
South Carolina 7
Also known as the Chester district
Thomas Moore Democratic-Republican 1800 Re-elected Thomas Moore[8] (DR)
South Carolina 8
Also known as the Pendleton district
John B. Earle Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected John B. Earle[8] (DR)

In the 8th district, John B. Earle (DR) Resigned before the 9th Congress met, replaced in a special election by Elias Earle (DR)

Levi Casey of the 6th district died February 7, 1807. His seat remained vacant for the remainder of the 9th Congress.

Tennessee[edit]

Beginning with the 9th Congress, Tennessee was divided into 3 districts.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Tennessee 1
Known as the Washington district
John Rhea
Redistricted from the at-large district
Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected John Rhea (DR) 100%
Tennessee 2
Known as the Hamilton district
George W. Campbell
Redistricted from the at-large district
Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected George W. Campbell (DR) 100%
Tennessee 3
Known as the Mero district
William Dickson
Redistricted from the at-large district
Democratic-Republican 1801 Re-elected William Dickson (DR) 100%

Vermont[edit]

Vermont law at this time required a majority for election, which frequently mandated runoff elections. The 2nd, and 3rd districts both required second elections in this election cycle, and the 3rd district required a third election.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[9]
First ballot Second ballot Third ballot
Vermont 1
Known as the Southwestern district
Gideon Olin Democratic-Republican 1802 Re-elected Gideon Olin (DR) 56.1%
Jonas Galusha (DR) 24.0%
Chauncey Langdon 18.6%
Others 1.4%
Vermont 2
Known as the Southeastern district
James Elliot Federalist 1802 Re-elected James Elliot (F) 41.9%
Samuel Fletcher (F) 15.6%
Mark Richards (DR) 15.5%
Pascal P. Enos (DR) 12.1%
Aaron Leland (DR) 4.3%
Lewis R. Morris (F) 3.1%
Elias Keyes (DR) 2.9%
Paul Brigham (DR) 1.4%
Others 3.1%
James Elliot (F) 62.0%
Mark Richards (DR) 36.4%
Others 1.6%
Vermont 3
Known as the Northeastern district
William Chamberlain Federalist 1802 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
William Chamberlain (F) 48.0%
James Fisk (DR) 38.4%
Nathaniel Niles (DR) 9.9%
Samuel C. Crafts (DR) 2.6%
Others 1.2%
William Chamberlain (F) 49.3%
James Fisk (DR) 49.1%
Others 1.6%
James Fisk (DR) 56.1%
William Chamberlain (F) 42.7%
Others 1.2%
Vermont 4
Known as the Northwestern district
Martin Chittenden Federalist 1802 Re-elected Martin Chittenden (F) 50.4%
Ezra Butler (DR) 46.7%
Others 3.0%

Virginia[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Virginia 1 John G. Jackson Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected John G. Jackson (DR) 57.2%
Thomas Wilson (F) 42.8%
Virginia 2 James Stephenson Federalist 1803 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
John Morrow[8] (DR)
James Stephenson (F)
Virginia 3 John Smith Democratic-Republican 1801 Re-elected John Smith[8] (DR)
Virginia 4 David Holmes Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected David Holmes[8] (DR)
Virginia 5 Alexander Wilson Democratic-Republican 1804 (special) Re-elected Alexander Wilson (DR) 60.6%
Robert Bailey (Quid) 39.4%
Virginia 6 Abram Trigg Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected Abram Trigg[8] (DR)
Virginia 7 Joseph Lewis, Jr. Federalist 1803 Re-elected Joseph Lewis, Jr. (F) 54.3%
William Elzey (DR) 45.7%
Virginia 8 Walter Jones Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Walter Jones (DR) 99.0%
Henry Lee (F) 1.0%
Virginia 9 Philip R. Thompson Democratic-Republican 1793 Re-elected Philip R. Thompson[8] (DR)
Virginia 10 John Dawson Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected John Dawson (DR) 66.2%
James Barbour (Quid) 33.8%
Virginia 11 Anthony New Democratic-Republican 1793 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
James M. Garnett[8] (DR)
Carter Braxton
John Roane (DR?)
John Smith
Archibald Ritchie
Virginia 12 Thomas Griffin Federalist 1803 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Burwell Bassett (DR) 65.1%
Thomas Griffin (F) 34.9%
Virginia 13 Christopher H. Clark Democratic-Republican 1804 (special) Re-elected Christopher H. Clark[8] (DR)
Virginia 14 Matthew Clay Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected Matthew Clay (DR) 88.9%
William Lewis (F) 11.1%
Virginia 15 John Randolph Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected John Randolph[8] (DR)
Virginia 16 John W. Eppes Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected John W. Eppes[8] (DR)
Virginia 17 Thomas Claiborne Democratic-Republican 1793
1801
Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Claiborne (DR) 72.7%
Mark Alexander (DR) 27.3%
Virginia 18 Peterson Goodwyn Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Peterson Goodwyn[8] (DR)
Virginia 19 Edwin Gray Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected Edwin Gray[8] (DR)
Virginia 20 Thomas Newton, Jr. Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected Thomas Newton, Jr. (DR) 100%
Virginia 21 Thomas M. Randolph Democratic-Republican 1803 Re-elected Thomas M. Randolph (DR) 63.7%
Walter Leake (Quid) 36.3%
Virginia 22 John Clopton Democratic-Republican 1801 Re-elected John Clopton[8] (DR)

In the 13th district, Christopher H. Clark (DR) resigned on July 1, 1806 and was replaced by William A. Burwell

Non-voting delegates[edit]

There were three territories with non-voting delegates in the 9th Congress, one of which (the Orleans Territory) did not send its first representative until 1806. The delegates were elected by the territorial legislatures, votes here are the number of members of the territorial legislatures voting for each candidate.

District Incumbent First
elected
Result Candidates
First ballot Second ballot Third ballot
Indiana Territory at-large None (District created) Benjamin Parke 5
Thomas J. Davis 5
Jesse B. Thomas 1
Benjamin Parke 5
Thomas J. Davis 5
Bond[14] 1
Benjamin Parke 7
Thomas J. Davis 4
Mississippi Territory at-large William Lattimore 1802 Re-elected William Lattimore 5
Cato West 5
William Gordon Freeman 4
William Lattimore 10
Cato West 2
John Ellis 1

In the Mississippi Territory, the territorial legislature was locked. The first vote given above was on the 7th ballot, after which point the territorial legislature adjourned, the second vote was at a later session of the territorial legislature.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Includes 1 plural district
  2. ^ Includes 4 plural districts
  3. ^ Majority required for election, which was not met in 2 districts necessitating additional elections on December 18, 1804 and March 25, 1805
  4. ^ Changed from at-large
  5. ^ a b c Elected in subsequent special election
  6. ^ A New Nation Votes: American Elections Returns: 1787-1825
  7. ^ In Vermont
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Source does not give numbers of votes or has incomplete data
  9. ^ a b c d e Only candidates with at least 1% of the vote listed
  10. ^ Elected to fill vacancy in 8th Congress
  11. ^ Source does not give complete results, but partial results suggest a very large majority
  12. ^ Wilkes University Elections Statistics Project
  13. ^ Source did not have returns for Israel
  14. ^ Source does not give full name