United States House of Representatives elections in Georgia, 2010

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Elections were held on November 2, 2010, to determine Georgia's 13 members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th United States Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on July 20, 2010 and primary runoff elections were held on August 10, 2010.[1]

Of the 13 elections, the races in the 2nd and 8th districts were rated as competitive by CQ Politics,[2] The Rothenberg Political Report[3] and Sabato's Crystal Ball,[4][5] and the 2nd, 8th and 12th districts were rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report.[6] Of Georgia's thirteen incumbents, eleven were re-elected,[7] while one (John Linder of the 7th district) did not seek re-election[8] and one (Jim Marshall of the 8th district) unsuccessfully sought re-election.[9]

In total, eight Republicans and five Democrats were elected.[7] A total of 2,468,680 votes were cast, of which 1,528,142 (61.90 percent) were for Republican candidates, 940,347 (38.09 percent) were for Democratic candidates and 191 (0.01 percent) were for write-in candidates.[10]

District 1[edit]

Jack Kingston, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 1st district

The 1st district included Hinesville and parts of Savannah and Valdosta.[11] The district's population was 68 percent white, 24 percent black and 5 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 82 percent were high school graduates and 19 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $43,481.[12] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 62 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 37 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[11]

Republican Jack Kingston, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Kingston was re-elected in 2008 with 67 percent of the vote.[11] In 2010 Kingston's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Oscar Harris II, a farmer.[13] Both Kingston and Harris were unopposed in their respective primaries.[12]

Kingston raised $1,029,117 and spent $759,470.[14] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Kingston a 100 chance of winning and projected that he would receive 71 percent of the vote to Harris's 27 percent.[15] On election day Kingston was re-elected with 72 percent of the vote to Harris's 28 percent.[16] Kingston was again re-elected in 2012.[17]

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 1st district general election, November 2, 2010[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Kingston (incumbent) 117,270 71.63%
Democratic Oscar Harris II 46,449 28.37%
Totals 163,719 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 2[edit]

Sanford Bishop, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district

The 2nd district included Albany, Columbus and Thomasville.[18] The district's population was 47 percent black and 47 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 77 percent were high school graduates and 15 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $34,860.[19] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 45 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[18] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+1.[6]

Democrat Sanford Bishop, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Bishop was re-elected in 2008 with 69 percent of the vote.[18] In 2010 Bishop's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Mike Keown, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives.[20] Bishop was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[21] Rick Allen, a medical supply businessman; and Lee Ferrell, a retired staff sergeant, also sought the Republican nomination.[22]

Bishop raised $1,485,600 and spent $1,776,500. Keown raised $1,213,707 and spent $1,154,740.[23] Allen raised $11,166 and spent $9,754.[24] Ferrell raised $15,260 and spent $11,120.[25]

An August 2010 poll by Public Opinion Strategies (POS) found Bishop leading with 50 percent to Keown's 44 percent.[26] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by POS on September 27 and 28, 2010, Bishop led with 47 percent to Keown's 46 percent while 7 percent were undecided.[27] In a poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Lester & Associates for Bishop's campaign between October 7 and 10, 2010, 50 percent supported Bishop while 40 percent favored Keown and 10 percent were undecided.[28] A poll with a sample size of 836, conducted on October 19, 2010 by Landmark Communications, Inc., (LCI) found Keown leading with 47 percent to Bishop's 45 percent while 8 percent were undecided.[29] An LCI poll with a sample size of 914, conducted on October 27, 2010, found Keown had the support of 50 percent while 46 percent backed Bishop and 4 percent were undecided.[30]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "leans Republican".[4] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"[6] and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".[2] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "lean Democrat".[3] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Keown a 60 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 51 percent of the vote to Bishop's 49 percent.[31]

On election day Bishop was re-elected with 51 percent of the vote to Keown's 49 percent.[32] Bishop was again re-elected in 2012.[33] Keown unsuccessfully ran for a seat in the Georgia State Senate in 2010.[34]

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 2nd district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Keown 23,945 80.84%
Republican Rick Allen 3,283 11.08%
Republican Lee Ferrell 2,393 8.08%
Totals 29,621 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 2nd district general election, November 2, 2010[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sanford Bishop (incumbent) 86,520 51.44%
Republican Mike Keown 81,673 48.56%
Totals 168,193 100.00%

External links[edit]

Campaign websites[edit]

Further reading[edit]

District 3[edit]

Lynn Westmoreland, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Newnan, Peachtree City and part of Columbus.[36] The district's population was 70 percent white and 23 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $56,489.[37] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 64 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 35 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[36]

Republican Lynn Westmoreland, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Westmoreland was re-elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[36] In April 2009 Westmoreland's press secretary said the congressman was considering running for Governor of Georgia;[38] however later that month he said he would instead seek re-election.[39] In 2010 Westmoreland's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Frank Saunders, a schoolteacher.[40] Jagdish Agrawal also ran as a write-in candidate.[41] Westmoreland and Saunders were unopposed in their respective primaries.[37]

Westmoreland raised $785,044 and spent $712,529. Saunders raised $44,112 and spent $43,282.[42] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Westmoreland a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 70 percent of the vote to Saunders's 27 percent.[43] On election day Westmoreland was re-elected with 69 to Saunders's 31 percent.[44] Westmoreland was again re-elected in 2012.[45]

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 3rd district general election, November 2, 2010[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Westmoreland (incumbent) 168,304 69.48%
Democratic Frank Saunders 73,932 30.52%
Write-in Jagdish Agrawal 3 0.00%
Totals 242,239 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 4[edit]

Hank Johnson, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 4th district

The 4th district included North Atlanta, Redan and Tucker.[46] The district's population was 55 percent black, 24 percent white, 15 percent Hispanic and 5 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 84 percent were high school graduates and 30 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $50,222.[47] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 79 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 20 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[46]

Democrat Hank Johnson, who took office in 2007, was the incumbent. Johnson was re-elected unopposed in 2008.[46] In 2010 Johnson's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Lisbeth Carter, a consultant.[48]

Vernon Jones, the former chief executive officer of DeKalb County; and Connie Stokes, a DeKalb County Commissioner, also sought the Democratic nomination.[48] Lee May, also a DeKalb County Commissioner, announced in February 2010 that he would not run in the Democratic primary.[49] In a poll of 400 likely Democratic primary voters, conducted by Lake Research Partners for Johnson's campaign between January 14 and 20, 2010, Johnson led with 47 percent to Jones's 19 percent while Stokes had the support of 12 percent, 5 percent favored May, and 15 percent were undecided.[50][51] Victor Armendariz, a publishing salesman;[52] Larry Gause, a retired officer in the U.S. Navy;[53] and Cory Ruth, an information security manager,[54] also sought the Republican nomination.

Johnson raised $581,545 and spent $589,780. Carter raised $118,102 and spent the same amount.[55] Jones raised $73,225 and spent $74,405.[56] Stokes raised $78,668 and spent $78,629.[57] Gause raised $3,997 and spent $2,931.[58] Ruth raised $12,626 and spent $12,398.[59]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Johnson a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 74 percent of the vote to Carter's 23 percent.[60] On election day Johnson was re-elected with 75 percent of the vote to Carter's 25 percent.[61] Johnson was again re-elected in 2012.[62]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Georgia's 4th district Democratic primary, July 20, 2010[63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hank Johnson (incumbent) 28,095 55.18%
Democratic Vernon Jones 13,407 26.33%
Democratic Connie Stokes 9,411 18.48%
Totals 50,913 100.00%

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 4th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[64]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lisbeth Carter 9,549 54.75%
Republican Larry Gause 4,455 25.54%
Republican Victor Armendariz 1,741 9.98%
Republican Cory Ruth 1,697 9.73%
Totals 17,442 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 4th district general election, November 2, 2010[61]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hank Johnson (incumbent) 131,760 74.67%
Republican Lisbeth Carter 44,707 25.33%
Totals 176,467 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 5[edit]

John Lewis, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 5th district

The 5th district included Atlanta and parts of East Point and Sandy Springs.[65] The district's population was 50 percent black, 38 percent white and 8 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 43 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $50,072.[66] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 79 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 20 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[65]

Democrat John Lewis was the incumbent. Lewis was re-elected unopposed in 2008.[65] In 2010 Lewis's opponent in the general election was Fenn Little, a civil rights attorney and small business owner.[67] Kelly Nguyen, a graphic artist, also sought the Republican nomination.[68]

Lewis raised $1,013,992 and spent $1,115,868. Little raised $107,759 and spent $92,206.[69] Nguyen raised $13,433 and spent $14,436.[70]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Lewis a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 75 percent of the vote to Little's 22 percent.[71] On election day Lewis was re-elected with 74 percent of the vote to Little's 26 percent.[72] Lewis was again re-elected in 2012.[62]

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 5th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[73]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fenn Little 8,758 59.60%
Republican Kelly Nguyen 5,937 40.40%
Totals 14,695 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 5th district general election, November 2, 2010[72]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Lewis (incumbent) 130,782 73.72%
Republican Fenn Little 46,622 26.28%
Totals 177,404 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 6[edit]

Tom Price, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 6th district

The 6th district included Alpharetta, Dunwoody, Johns Creek, Roswell and part of Sandy Springs.[74] The district's population was 74 percent white, 9 percent black, 9 percent Hispanic and 6 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 94 percent were high school graduates and 53 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $82,593.[75] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 63 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 35 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[74]

Republican Tom Price, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Price was re-elected in 2008 with 69 percent of the vote.[74] In 2010 Price was the only candidate on the ballot in the 6th district;[76] however write-in candidate Sean Greenberg, a bartender, also ran.[77]

Price raised $2,070,230 and spent $1,218,835.[78] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Price a 100 percent chance of winning.[79] On election day Price was re-elected with 100 percent of the vote.[80] Price was again re-elected in 2012.[81]

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 6th district general election, November 2, 2010[80]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Price (incumbent) 198,100 99.91%
Write-in Sean Greenberg 188 0.09%
Totals 198,288 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 7[edit]

Rob Woodall, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 7th district
Doug Heckman, who also ran in the 7th district

The 7th district included Duluth and Lawrenceville.[82] The district's population was 60 percent white, 19 percent black, 11 percent Hispanic and 8 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 34 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $67,059.[83] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 60 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 39 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[82]

Republican John Linder, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Linder was re-elected in 2008 with 62 percent of the vote.[82] In 2010 Linder retired rather than seeking re-election.[8] The candidates in the general election were Republican nominee Rob Woodall, Linder's former chief of staff; and Democratic nominee Doug Heckman, a financial services manager.[84] Clay Cox, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives; Chuck Efstration, an assistant district attorney in Gwinnett County; Jef Fincher, a small business owner and flight attendant;[85] Ronnie Grist, a retired employee of the state government;[86] Jody Hice, a radio talk show host and former pastor; Tom Kirby, a human resource safety manager; and Tom Parrott, a salesman and former accountant, also sought the Republican nomination.[85]

In February 2010, a consultant for Karen Handel, a former Secretary of State of Georgia, said Handel would not seek the Republican nomination in the 7th district and would instead remain a candidate in the gubernatorial election.[87] The same month John Smoltz, a former Atlanta Braves pitcher, said he would not seek the Republican nomination.[88] In March 2010 Ralph E. Reed, Jr., the former executive director of the Christian Coalition of America, said he would not run.[89] David Shafer, a member of the Georgia State Senate who had considered seeking the Republican nomination, announced in March 2010 that he would not run.[90] Don Balfour, also a member of the State Senate, announced that he would run in March 2010,[91] but later that month ended his campaign.[92]

Woodall and Hice advanced to the primary runoff election.[93] In a poll of the runoff, conducted on August 28, 2010 by Landmark Communications, Inc. (LCI) with a sample size of 789, Woodall led with 47 percent to Hice's 32 percent while 20 percent were undecided.[94] Heckman was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[95]

Woodall raised $399,086 and spent $323,801. Heckman raised $81,220 and spent $73,899.[96] Cox raised $287,336 and spent $286,474.[97] Efstration raised $56,214 and spent $54,102.[98] Fincher raised $33,100 and spent the same amount.[99] Hice raised $279,017 and spent $278,566.[100] Kirby raised $5,925 and spent $8,122.[101] Parrott raised $17,475 and spent $14,515.[102]

In a poll of 1,070 likely voters, conducted by LCI on October 25, 2010, Woodall led with 60 percent to Heckman's 30 percent.[103] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Woodall a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 68 percent of the vote to Heckman's 32 percent.[104] On election day Woodall was elected with 67 percent of the vote to Heckman's 33 percent.[105] Woodall was re-elected in 2012.[106]

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 7th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[107]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Woodall 26,374 34.64%
Republican Jody Hice 20,034 26.31%
Republican Clay Cox 15,249 20.03%
Republican Jef Fincher 4,608 6.05%
Republican Tom Kirby 3,052 4.01%
Republican Chuck Efstration 2,837 3.73%
Republican Tom Parrott 1,648 2.16%
Republican Ronnie Grist 1,083 1.42%
Totals 76,145 100.00%

Republican primary runoff results[edit]

Georgia's 7th district Republican primary runoff, August 10, 2010[108]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Woodall 39,987 55.99%
Republican Jody Hice 31,426 44.01%
Totals 71,413 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 7th district general election, November 2, 2010[105]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Woodall 160,898 67.07%
Democratic Doug Heckman 78,996 32.93%
Totals 239,894 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 8[edit]

Austin Scott, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 8th district
Jim Marshall, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 8th district

The 8th district included Macon and part of Warner Robins.[109] The district's population was 61 percent white and 33 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 79 percent were high school graduates and 18 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,697.[110] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 43 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[109] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+10.[6]

Democrat Jim Marshall, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. Marshall was re-elected in 2008 with 57 percent of the vote.[109] In 2010 Marshall's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Austin Scott, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives.[111] Marshall was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[21] Ken DeLoach, a school administrator; and Diane Vann, a former nurse, also sought the Republican nomination.[112] Paul Rish, the former head of the Bibb County Republican Party, ended his campaign in April 2010.[113] Angela Hicks, a businesswoman, ended her campaign for the Republican nomination in May 2010.[114]

Marshall raised $1,496,152 and spent $1,814,549. Scott raised $1,035,300 and spent $1,024,631.[115] DeLoach raised $30,941 and spent the same amount.[116] Vann raised no money and spent $17,293.[117] Hicks raised $78,171 and spent the same amount.[118]

In a poll conducted by American Viewpoint (AV) for Scott's campaign in late July 2010, Marshall led with 44 percent to Scott's 39 percent.[119] A poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Grove Insight for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee between September 13 and 15, 2010, Marshall led with 48 percent to Scott's 36 percent.[120] An AV poll of 300 likely voters, conducted on September 26 and 27, 2010 and released by Scott's campaign, found Scott leading with 46 percent to Marshall's 38 percent.[121] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by the Mellman Group between October 17 and 19, 2010, 47 percent of respondents supported Marshall while 44 percent favored Scott and 9 percent were undecided.[122] A poll conducted by Landmark Communications, Inc. (LCI) on October 19, 2010, with a sample size of 763, found Scott leading with 54 percent to Marshall's 35 percent, while 14 percent were undecided.[123] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Penn Schoen Berland between October 19 and 21, 2010, Scott led with 50 percent to Marshall's 37 percent while 10 percent were undecided.[124] In a poll of 1,133 likely voters, conducted by LCI on October 26, 2010, Scott led with 53 percent to Marshall's 39 percent.[125]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "leans Republican".[5] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"[6] and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".[2] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "lean Republican".[3] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Scott a 94 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 56 percent of the vote to Marshall's 44 percent.[126]

On election day Scott was elected with 53 percent of the vote to Marshall's 47 percent.[127] Scott was re-elected in 2012.[45] In 2012 Marshall became president and chief executive officer of the United States Institute of Peace,[128] stepping down in January 2014.[129]

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 8th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[130]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Austin Scott 22,191 52.36%
Republican Ken DeLoach 13,228 31.21%
Republican Diane Vann 6,959 16.42%
Totals 42,378 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 8th district general election, November 2, 2010[127]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Austin Scott 102,770 52.70%
Democratic Jim Marshall (incumbent) 92,250 47.30%
Totals 195,020 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 9[edit]

Tom Graves, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 9th district

The 9th district included Dalton and Gainesville.[131] The district's population was 81 percent white and 13 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 77 percent were high school graduates and 20 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $49,065.[132] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 75 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 23 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[131]

Republican Tom Graves, who was elected in a June 2010 special election, was the incumbent. He succeeded fellow Republican Nathan Deal, who was re-elected with 76 percent of the vote in 2008.[131] In the November 2010 general election Graves was unopposed for re-election.[133]

Lee Hawkins, a former member of the Georgia State Senate;[134] Bobby Reese, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives; and Steve Tarvin also sought the Republican nomination.[76] Chris Cates[135] and Bert Loftman, a neurosurgeon;[136] withdrew from the race before the primary but remained on the Republican primary ballot. Bill Stephens, the former majority leader of the State Senate, ended his campaign in May 2010.[137] As in the special election, Graves and Hawkins advanced to the primary runoff election, which marked the fourth time the two men faced one another for the seat in 2010.[138] Mike Freeman, a retired pastor, announced in April 2010 that he would not seek the Democratic nomination.[139]

Across both elections, Graves raised $1,312,938 and spent $1,309,824.[140] Hawkins raised $1,025,707 and spent $1,023,928.[141] Reese raised $23,991 and spent $21,076.[142] Tarvin raised $450,327 and spent $447,891.[143] Cates raised $483,218 and spent $482,774.[144] Loftman raised $18,405 and reported spending $-10,190.[145] Stephens raised $114,908 and spent the same amount.[146] Freeman raised $37,973 and spent the same amount.[147] Graves was again re-elected in 2012.[106]

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 9th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[148]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Graves (incumbent) 38,851 49.47%
Republican Lee Hawkins 20,957 26.69%
Republican Steve Tarvin 11,529 14.68%
Republican Chris Cates 5,051 6.43%
Republican Bobby Reese 1,362 1.73%
Republican Bert Loftman 782 1.00%
Totals 78,532 100.00%

Republican primary runoff results[edit]

Georgia's 9th district Republican primary runoff, August 10, 2010[149]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Graves (incumbent) 41,878 55.21%
Republican Lee Hawkins 33,975 44.79%
Totals 75,853 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 10[edit]

Paul Broun, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 10th district

The 10th district included Athens-Clarke, Martinez and Augusta-Richmond.[150] The district's population was 73 percent white, 19 percent black and 5 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 81 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $43,135.[151] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 62 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 37 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[150]

Republican Paul Broun, who took office in 2007, was the incumbent. Broun was re-elected in 2008 with 61 percent of the vote.[150] In 2010 Broun's opponent in the general election was Russell Edwards,[151] a law student and former teacher.[152] Broun and Edwards were unopposed in their respective primaries.[151]

Broun raised $2,032,417 and spent $1,831,081. Edwards raised $220,662 and spent $218,078.[153] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Broun a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 67 percent of the vote to Edwards's 31 percent.[154] On election day Broun was re-elected with 67 percent of the vote to Edwards's 33 percent.[155] Broun was again re-elected in 2012.[45]

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 10th district general election, November 2, 2010[155]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Broun (incumbent) 138,062 67.36%
Democratic Russell Edwards 66,905 32.64%
Totals 204,967 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 11[edit]

Phil Gingrey, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 11th district

The 11th district included Kennesaw, Rome and part of Marietta.[156] The district's population was 75 percent white, 14 percent black and 8 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 82 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $53,784.[157] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 66 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 33 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[156]

Republican Phil Gingrey, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. Gingrey was re-elected in 2008 with 68 percent of the vote.[76] In 2010 Gingrey was unopposed for re-election.[158] Gingrey raised $1,389,039 and spent $920,811.[159] Gingrey was again re-elected in 2012.[160]

External links[edit]

District 12[edit]

John Barrow, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 12th district

The 12th district included Statesboro and parts of Augusta-Richmond and Savannah.[161] The district's population was 50 percent white and 44 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 78 percent were high school graduates and 16 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $36,643.[162] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 45 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[161] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+1.[6]

Democrat John Barrow, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Barrow was re-elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[161] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Ray McKinney, a project manager for nuclear power plants.[163]

Regina Thomas, a former member of the Georgia State Senate, also sought the Democratic nomination.[164] Thomas also planned to run as a write-in candidate in the general election,[165] but in August 2010 the office of the Secretary of State of Georgia ruled that she was ineligible to do so.[166] In March 2010 John McArdle of CQ Politics wrote that the name of Michael Thurmond, the state Labor Commissioner, was "being floated by Georgia insiders" as a potential candidate in the Democratic primary;[167] however in April 2010 Thurmond announced he would run for the U.S. Senate.[168] Lester Jackson, another member of the State Senate, said in April 2010 that he would seek re-election rather than challenging Barrow for the Democratic nomination.[169]

Mike Horner, a retired U.S. Air Force officer and banker;[170] Jeanne Seaver, an activist;[171] and Carl Smith, the fire chief of Thunderbolt,[170] also sought the Republican nomination. Wayne Mosley, a doctor and former U.S. Army lieutenant colonel, ended his campaign for the Republican nomination in October 2009.[172] McKinney and Smith advanced to the primary runoff election.[173]

Barrow raised $1,951,721 and spent $1,905,568. McKinney raised $250,534 and spent $246,792.[174] Thomas raised $48,353 and spent $46,311.[175] Horner raised $13,865 and spent $13,782.[176] Seaver raised $43,022 and spent $42,960.[177] Smith raised $72,085 and spent $71,987.[178] Mosley raised $29,470 and spent the same amount.[179]

In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "likely Democratic".[6] The same month John Fund of The Wall Street Journal included the race as one of "five races that could deliver upset victories", on grounds that the district had voted for George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election.[180] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Barrow a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 60 percent of the vote to McKinney's 38 percent.[181] On election day Barrow was re-elected with 57 percent of the vote to McKinney's 43 percent.[182] Barrow was again re-elected in 2012.[183]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Georgia's 12th district Democratic primary, July 20, 2010[184]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Barrow (incumbent) 19,505 57.87%
Democratic Regina Thomas 14,201 42.13%
Totals 33,706 100.00%

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 12th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[185]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ray McKinney 11,709 42.61%
Republican Carl Smith 7,677 24.94%
Republican Jeanne Seaver 5,040 18.34%
Republican Mike Horner 3,051 11.10%
Totals 27,477 100.00%

Republican primary runoff results[edit]

Georgia's 12th district Republican primary runoff, August 10, 2010[186]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ray McKinney 14,256 62.04%
Republican Carl Smith 8,724 37.96%
Totals 22,980 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 12th district general election, November 2, 2010[182]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Barrow (incumbent) 92,459 56.59%
Republican Ray McKinney 70,938 43.41%
Totals 163,397 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 13[edit]

David Scott, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 13th district

The 13th district included Mableton and part of Smyrna.[187] The district's population was 53 percent black, 31 percent white and 11 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 85 percent were high school graduates and 25 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $51,398.[188] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 72 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 27 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[187]

Democrat David Scott, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. Scott was re-elected in 2008 with 69 percent of the vote.[187] In 2010 Scott's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Mike Crane,[188] a general contractor.[189]

Michael Frisbee and Mike Murphy also sought the Democratic nomination.[190] Hank Dudek, a regional account manager for a background screening company; Chip Flanegan, a small business owner; Deborah Honeycutt, a medical director at Clayton State University Health Services; Dave Orr, a food and restaurant business manager; and Rupert Parchment, the owner of Decor Moving Services, also sought the Republican nomination.[191] Crane and Honeycutt advanced to the primary runoff election.[192]

Scott raised $862,262 and spent $811,744. Crane raised $147,199 and spent $143,214.[193] Frisbee raised $6,751 and spent $6,509.[194] Murphy raised $12,435 and spent $13,670.[195] Dudek raised $8,196 and spent $8,790.[196] Flanegan raised $49,400 and spent $47,112.[197] Honeycutt raised $196,736 and spent $278,163.[198] Orr raised $10,519 and spent $10,518.[199] Parchment raised $17,363 and spent $16,900.[200]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Scott a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Crane's 35 percent.[201] On election day Scott was re-elected with 69 percent of the vote to Crane's 31 percent.[202] Scott was one of eight Democratic U.S. Representatives who were elected by a greater margin in 2010 than in 2008.[203] Scott was again re-elected in 2012.[204] In December 2011 Crane won a seat in the Georgia State Senate.[205]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Georgia's 13th district Democratic primary, July 20, 2010[206]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Scott (incumbent) 34,374 76.12%
Democratic Mike Murphy 7,556 16.73%
Democratic Michael Frisbee 3,229 7.15%
Totals 45,159 100.00%

Republican primary results[edit]

Georgia's 13th district Republican primary, July 20, 2010[207]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Crane 7,234 29.41%
Republican Deborah Honeycutt 6,538 26.58%
Republican Chip Flanegan 4,137 16.82%
Republican Dave Orr 3,113 12.66%
Republican Hank Dudek 2,322 9.44%
Republican Rupert Parchment 1,257 5.11%
Totals 24,601 100.00%

Republican primary runoff results[edit]

Georgia's 13th district Republican primary runoff, August 10, 2010[208]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Crane 15,286 67.53%
Republican Deborah Honeycutt 7,349 32.47%
Totals 22,635 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Georgia's 13th district general election, November 2, 2010[202]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Scott (incumbent) 140,294 69.43%
Republican Mike Crane 61,771 30.57%
Totals 202,065 100.00%

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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