United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana, 2012

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 and elected the six U.S. Representatives from the state of Louisiana, one from each of the state's six congressional districts, a loss of one seat following reapportionment according to the results of the 2010 Census. The elections coincided with elections for other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election. A jungle primary will take place on November 6, with a runoff, if necessary, held on December 8.[1]

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Louisiana, 2012[2][3]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,143,027 67.02% 5 -1
Democratic 359,190 21.06% 1
Libertarian 124,572 7.30% 0
Independents 78,828 4.62% 0
Totals 1,705,617 100.00% 6

Redistricting[edit]

During the redistricting process, U.S. Representative Charles Boustany advocated a plan which, rather than drawing his home and that of Landry into the same district (as the bill which became law did), would instead make fellow Republican Representative John Fleming's district potentially more competitive. Fleming later said of Boustany, "I don't feel like I can trust anything he says. Everything he told me, he reneged on."[4]

Due to difficulties reaching a consensus among the congressional delegation, U.S. Representatives Rodney Alexander, Bill Cassidy, Fleming, Jeff Landry and Steve Scalise wrote to Governor Bobby Jindal requesting that the state legislature postpone the redistricting process for a year.[5]

Nonetheless, a redistricting bill was passed by the Louisiana House of Representatives and Louisiana Senate, and was signed into law by Jindal on April 14, 2011.[6]

Louisiana is among the states which, according to a provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act enacted upon states with a history of denial of voting rights, must submit legislative maps to the U.S. Department of Justice for approval in order to ascertain that the purpose and effects of the map are not discriminatory.[6]

District 1[edit]

Republican Steve Scalise, who has represented the 1st district since 2008, is running for re-election.[7][8] In redistricting the 1st district has been extended from Metairie towards the Gulf Coast[9] and includes the cities of Slidell and Houma, and the two parishes hardest hit by Hurricane Katrina, St. Bernard and Plaquemines.[7] It comprises 373,405 White Americans registered voters, 46,542 African Americans and 30,126 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 167,824 are affiliated to the Democratic Party, 167,336 to the Republican Party, and 114,913 to neither party.[6]

Gary King is also running as a Republican. M.V. "Vinny" Mendoza, an organic farmer, Air Force veteran, and perennial candidate, is running as a Democrat. David "Turk" Turknett, and Arden Wells, who ran without party affiliation in 2010, are running without party affiliations.[10][11]

Non-Partisan Primary and General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 1st Congressional District 2012 [12][13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican "Steve" Scalise (Incumbent) 193,496 66.63%
Democratic M. V. "Vinny" Mendoza 61,703 21.25%
Republican Gary King 24,844 8.55%
No Party David "Turk" Turknett 6,079 2.09%
No Party Arden Wells 4,288 1.48%
Totals 290,410 100.0%


District 2[edit]

Democrat Cedric Richmond, who has represented the 2nd district since January 2011, is running for re-election.[14] In redistricting, the district was extended in redistricting along the Mississippi River to include Baton Rouge.[7] It comprises 144,721 White Americans registered voters, 276,668 African Americans and 27,558 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 302,120 are Democrats, 51,268 are Republicans, and 95,559 are affiliated to neither party.[6]

Gary Landrieu, a real estate developer and cousin of New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, is also running as a Democrat. Dwayne Bailey, a refinery worker, and Josue Larose, a Super PAC organizer living in Florida, are running as Republicans. Caleb Trotter, a banker and law school student, is running as a Libertarian.[11][15][16]

Non-Partisan Primary and General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 2nd Congressional District 2012 [12][13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cedric Richmond (Incumbent) 158,501 55.16%
Democratic Gary Landrieu 71,916 25.03%
Republican Dwayne Bailey 38,801 13.50%
Republican Josue Larose 11,345 3.95%
Libertarian Caleb Trotter 6,791 2.36%
Totals 287,354 100.0%
External links

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district includes the homes of Republican incumbents Jeff Landry and Charles Boustany, who have represented the 3rd district since January 2011 and the now-defunct 7th district since 2005 respectively.[9] It comprises 336,889 White Americans registered voters, 107,033 African Americans and 14,497 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 229,704 are Democrats, 120,787 are Republicans, and 107,928 are affiliated to neither party.[6]

The district is located in southern Louisiana and stretches from the Texas border to Iberia and St. Martin parishes.[7] It incorporates Lake Charles and Lafayette, which were centers of population in Boustany's former district. Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, which form a part of the district Landry currently represents, will no longer be in the 3rd district.[9]

Boustany and Landry are both running for re-election in this district.[17][18] Bryan Barrilleaux, a physician, is also running as a Republican. Ron Richard, an attorney, is running as a Democrat. Jim Stark, a truck driver, is running as a Libertarian.[11][19]

Non-Partisan Primary[edit]

Louisiana 3rd Congressional District Non-Partisan Primary Election 2012 [12][20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles W. Boustany (Incumbent) 139,123 44.68%
Republican "Jeff" Landry (Incumbent) 93,527 30.04%
Democratic "Ron" Richard 67,070 21.54%
Republican Bryan Barrilleaux 7,908 2.54%
Libertarian "Jim" Stark 3,765 1.21%
Totals 311,393 100.0%

General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 3rd Congressional District 2012 [21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles W. Boustanay, Jr. (Incumbent) 58,820 60.90%
Republican "Jeff" Landry (Incumbent) 37,767 39.10%
Totals 96,587 100.0%
External links

District 4[edit]

Republican John Fleming, who has represented the 4th district since 2009, is running for re-election.[22] The district comprises 276,373 White Americans registered voters, 140,630 African Americans and 15,020 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 221,187 are Democrats, 118,015 are Republicans, and 92,721 are affiliated to neither party.[6] Its boundaries remain similar to those of its previous incarnation:[9] it is anchored by Shreveport and borders Texas and Arkansas.[7]

Randall Lord, a former chiropractor, is running as a Libertarian.[23]

No Democrat is running in this district.[11] Brian Crawford, Shreveport's assistant chief administrative officer and former fire chief; Keith Hightower, the former mayor of Shreveport; Kyle Robinson, an attorney; and state Representative Patrick Williams, all Democrats, had been sought as potential candidates but chose not to run.[14][24]

Non-Partisan Primary and General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 4th Congressional District 2012 [13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Fleming (Incumbent) 187,894 75.30%
Libertarian Randall Lord 61,637 24.70%
Totals 249,531 100.0%
External links

District 5[edit]

Republican Rodney Alexander, who has represented the 5th district since 2003, is running for re-election.[14] The district comprises 294,830 White Americans registered voters, 144,744 African Americans and 11,107 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 239,963 are Democrats, 117,624 are Republicans, and 93,094 are affiliated to neither party.[6] The make-up of the 5th district, which mostly covers the northeast of the state,[7] now takes in the northern reaches of the Florida Parishes north of Baton Rouge.[9]

Clay Grant, a businessman, is running as a Libertarian. Ron Ceasar, who ran for Governor in 2011, is running without party affiliation.[11]

Non-Partisan Primary and General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 5th Congressional District 2012 [12][13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney Alexander (Incumbent) 202,536 77.83%
No Party "Ron" Ceasar 37,486 14.41%
Libertarian Clay Steven Grant 20,194 7.76%
Totals 260,216 100.0%
External links

District 6[edit]

Republican Bill Cassidy, who has represented the 6th district since 2009, is running for re-election.[25] The district comprises 334,899 White Americans registered voters, 88,460 African Americans and 16,873 people of other ethnicities. Of its voters, 194,088 are Democrats, 143,160 are Republicans, and 102,984 are affiliated to neither party.[6] It includes the suburbs of Baton Rouge and extends south as far as the outskirts of Houma.[7]

Rufus Holt Craig, Jr., a lawyer and Democratic nominee for the district in 2004, is running as a Libertarian.[23] Richard "RPT" Torregano, a technician, is running without party affiliation.[26]

Non-Partisan Primary and General Election Results[edit]

Louisiana 6th Congressional District 2012 [12][13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William "Bill" Cassidy (Incumbent) 243,553 79.41%
Libertarian Rufus Holt Craig 32,185 10.49%
No Party Richard "RPT" Torregano 30,975 10.10%
Totals 306,713 100.0%
External links

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2012 Elections". Secretary of State of Louisiana. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Statistics for the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 6, 2012". Karen Haas, Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. February 28, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2013. 
  3. ^ The numbers presented are those cast on November 6, 2013 and do not include the votes cast in the election of December 8, 2012 in the 3rd Congressional District. Charles Boustany (Rep.) received 58,820 votes and Jeff Landry (Rep.) received 37,767 votes in that election.
  4. ^ D'Aprile, Shane (April 14, 2011). "New Louisiana map sets up GOP primary battle". The Hill. Retrieved May 23, 2011. 
  5. ^ Ballard, Mark; Shuler, Marsha (April 9, 2011). "Majority of congressmen ask for redistricting delay". The Advocate. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Jindal signs bill creating new Louisiana congressional, legislative districts". The Times-Picayune. April 14, 2011. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Miller, Joshua (May 31, 2011). "Race Ratings: Primaries Are What to Watch in Louisiana". Roll Call. Retrieved June 29, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Rep. Steve Scalise helps recruit new GOP candidates". The Times-Picayune. July 31, 2011. Retrieved May 5, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Isenstadt, Alex (April 13, 2011). "Louisiana map sets up incumbent clash". Politico. Retrieved May 23, 2011. 
  10. ^ "In Louisiana, fall congressional races start to take shape". The Times-Picayune. August 15, 2012. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Anderson, Ed (August 17, 2012). "Louisiana's 6 congressional seats will all be contested". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved August 24, 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Louisiana Secretary of State Official Election Results for 11/06/2012". November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d e As a candidate received more than 50% of the vote in the Non-Partisan Primary, that candidate was declared elected to the House seat and no General Election was held.
  14. ^ a b c Burnett, Lou Gehrig (May 1, 2012). "Louisiana Congressional Races Dull, GOP, Democrat Parties Lively". BayouBuzz.com. Retrieved May 5, 2012. 
  15. ^ Anderson, Ed (August 17, 2012). "U.S. Rep. Rodney Alexander draws challenger; all incumbents now opposed". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved August 24, 2012. 
  16. ^ Tilove, Jonathan (August 17, 2012). "Cedric Richmond draws mysterious challenger in person of Josue Larose". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved August 24, 2012. 
  17. ^ Persac, Nicholas (January 20, 2012). "Boustany will 'absolutely' seek re-election". The Lafayette Daily Advertiser. Retrieved January 24, 2012. 
  18. ^ Tilove, Jonathan (May 14, 2012). "Jeff Landry announces he will go head-to-head with Boustany for re-election". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  19. ^ Hasten, Mike (August 15, 2012). "Boustany, Landry to face two challengers". The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  20. ^ As no candidate received 50% of the votes in the Non-Partisan Primary, a General Election for the 3rd Congressional District was held on December 8, 2012
  21. ^ "Louisiana Secretary of State Official Election Results for 12/08/2012". December 8, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Rep. John Fleming fails to intimidate Democrats with his tweets". The Times-Picayune. April 7, 2012. Retrieved May 5, 2012. 
  23. ^ a b Roberts III, Faimon A. (August 16, 2012). "Nov. 6 qualifying starts". The Advocate. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 
  24. ^ Burnett, Lou Gehrig (February 1, 2012). "Bananas over Foster". Bossier Press-Tribune. Retrieved June 2, 2012. 
  25. ^ Blum, Jordan (May 3, 2012). "Blum: 2014 election already under way". The Advocate. Retrieved May 5, 2012. 
  26. ^ Alford, Jeremy (August 16, 2012). "Candidates added to regional races". The Houma Courier. Retrieved August 17, 2012. 

External links[edit]