United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2010

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United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2010
Massachusetts
2008 ←
November 2, 2010
→ 2012

All 10 Massachusetts seats in the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Last election 10 seats, 100.0% 0 seats, 0.0% 0 seats, 0.0%
Seats before 10 0 0
Seats won 10 0 0
Seat change Steady Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,335,738 808,305 80,212
Percentage 57.48% 38.85% 3.65%
Swing -28.73 +26.63 +2.08

2010 House elections Massachusetts.svg

Election results by district

The 2010 congressional elections in Massachusetts was held on November 2, 2010, to determine who would represent the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives. Massachusetts has ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 112th Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. All current representatives are member of the Democratic Party and none of the ten faced major party opposition in 2008.

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2010[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,335,738 60.05% 10
Republican 808,305 36.34% 0
Independents 80,212 3.61% 0
Totals 2,224,255 100.00% 10

Results summary[edit]

The Democratic and Republican primaries took place on September 14, 2010. The general election was held on November 2, 2010.[2] All ten Democratic candidates won. The candidates in the general election were:[3]

District Incumbent Result Nominees
Democratic Republican Independent
1 John Olver (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected John Olver Bill Gunn Michael Engel
Independent
2 Richard Neal (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Richard Neal Tom Wesley
3 Jim McGovern (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Jim McGovern Marty Lamb Patrick Barron
Independent
4 Barney Frank (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Barney Frank Sean Bielat Susan Allen
Independent
Don Jordan
Tax Revolt Independent
5 Niki Tsongas (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Niki Tsongas Jon Golnik Dale Brown
Liberty
Robert Clark
Independent
6 John F. Tierney (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected John F. Tierney Bill Hudak
7 Edward J. Markey (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Edward J. Markey Gerry Dembrowski
8 Mike Capuano (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Mike Capuano Frederick Golder
9 Stephen Lynch (Democratic) Incumbent re-elected Stephen Lynch Vernon Harrison Philip Dunkelbarger
Independent
10 Bill Delahunt (Democratic) Incumbent retired.
Democratic hold
William R. Keating Jeff Perry Maryanne Lewis
Independent
Joe Van Nes
Bring Home Troops
Jim Sheets
Independent

District 1[edit]

Ma01 109.gif

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district covers roughly the northwest half of the state. It has been represented by Democrat John Olver since June, 1991.

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver (incumbent) 127,474 60.1%
Republican Bill Gunn 73,952 34.8%
Independent Michael Engel 10,841 5.1%
Totals 212,267 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

Fundraising totals for Olver and Gunn are as of October 13, 2010. Totals for Engel are as of September 30. Source: Federal Election Commission[4]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
John Olver (D) $819,402 $842,892 $79,980 $0
Bill Gunn (R) $39,731 $24,203 $15,528 $0
Michael Engel (I) $18,295 $3,640 $14,654 $0

District 2[edit]

Ma02 109.gif

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district lies in the south-central part of the state. It has been represented by Democrat Richard Neal since 1989.

The Republican Party nominee is Tom Wesley, who defeated Jay Fleitman in the September primary. Democrat Neal has not faced a Republican challenger since 1996.[5]

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Neal (incumbent) 122,547 57.3%
Republican Tom Wesley 91,181 42.7%
Totals 213,728 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[6]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Richard Neal (D) $2,131,010 $1,937,756 $2,400,446 $0
Tom Wesley (R) $123,203 $86,455 $1,660 $0

External links[edit]

District 3[edit]

Ma03 109.gif

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district lies in the central and southeastern part of the state. It has been represented by Democrat Jim McGovern since 1997.

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (incumbent) 122,357 56.5%
Republican Marty Lamb 84,972 39.2%
Independent Patrick Barron 9,304 4.3%
Totals 216,633 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[7]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Jim McGovern (D) $1,591,426 $1,570,083 $353,622 $0
Marty Lamb (R) $98,331 $60,089 $38,242 $27,200

External links[edit]

District 4[edit]

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district.gif

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district lies in the southern part of the state, including the South Coast region. It has been represented by Democrat Barney Frank since 1981. CQ Politics had forecast the race as 'Safe Democrat'. Rachel Brown, famous for comparing health care reform to a Nazi in front of Frank during a 2009 Town Hall meeting, ran unsuccessfully against Frank in the Democratic primary, losing 39,974 to 10,289. Sean Bielat, a technology executive from Brookline, won the Republican primary to challenge Frank, defeating Earl Sholley, the Republican Nominee from Norfolk in 2008, by a vote of 11,797 to 7,782.[8]

Polling[edit]

Poll Source Dates administered Barney Frank (D) Sean Bielat (R) Undecided
Boston Globe/UNH October 17–22, 2010 46% 33% -
WPRI/Fleming October 14–17, 2010 49% 37% 12%
Kiley & Co. October 13–14, 2010 56% 37% -
OnMessage Inc. September 15–16, 2010 48% 38% -
Massachusetts's 4th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barney Frank (incumbent) 125,823 53.9%
Republican Sean Bielat 101,315 43.4%
Independent Susan Allen 3,430 1.5%
Independent Donald Jordan 2,871 1.2%
Totals 233,439 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[9]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Barney Frank (D) $3,001,877 $2,525,757 $649,561 $0
Sean Bielat (R) $1,297,433 $834,520 $462,914 $0

External links[edit]

District 5[edit]

Ma05 109.gif

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district lies in the north-east part of the state. It has been represented by Democrat Niki Tsongas since she won a special election in October 16, 2007 upon the resignation of Marty Meehan (D).

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Niki Tsongas (incumbent) 122,676 54.9%
Republican Jon Golnik 94,501 42.3%
Independent (politician) Dale Brown 4,376 2.0%
Independent (politician) Bob Clark 1,986 0.9%
Totals 223,539 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 15, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[10]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Niki Tsongas (D) $1,703,083 $1,197,751 $520,827 $27,100
Jon Golnik (R) $300,652 $232,044 $68,608 $105,000
Dale Brown (I) $3,459 $3,515 $-57 $1,500

External links[edit]

District 6[edit]

MA-06 congressional district.png

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district covers the north-east corner of the state. It has been represented by Democrat John F. Tierney since 1997.

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Tierney (incumbent) 142,456 56.9%
Republican Bill Hudak 107,739 43.1%
Totals 250,195 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[11]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
John F. Tierney (D) $766,196 $611,356 $1,437,451 $0
Bill Hudak (R) $723,614 $628,743 $94,871 $19,923

External links[edit]

District 7[edit]

Ma07 109.gif

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district lies in the eastern part of the state, including some Boston suburbs. It has been represented by Democrat Edward J. Markey since 1976.

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edward J. Markey (incumbent) 141,364 65.9%
Republican Gerry Dembrowski 73,006 34.1%
Totals 214,370 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

Totals for Markey are as of October 13; totals for Dembrowski are as of October September 30. Source: Federal Election Commission[12]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Edward J. Markey (D) $1,424,700 $951,075 $3,299,910 $0
Gerry Dembrowski (R) $22,455 $18,723 $3,732 $0

External links[edit]

District 8[edit]

MA-08 congressional district.gif

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district lies in the eastern part of the state, including part of Boston and the immediately adjacent cities of Cambridge, Somerville, and Chelsea. It has been represented by Democrat Mike Capuano since 1999. Capuano ran unopposed.[13][14]

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[15]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Mike Capuano (D) $822,047 $1,894,452 $91,474 $48,250
Frederick Golder (R) $0 $0 $0 $0

External links[edit]

District 9[edit]

Ma09 109.gif

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district lies in the eastern part of the state, including part of Boston and some of its southern suburbs. It has been represented by Democrat Stephen Lynch since October 2001. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'.

In response to Lynch's vote against health care reform, Needham selectwoman Harmony Wu announced she was considering a run against Lynch in the Democratic Primary, but announced on April 7, 2010 that she decided not to run. On April 22 Mac D'Alessandro,[16] the New England political director of SEIU, announced his intention to challenge Lynch.[17] Polling has indicated[18] that Lynch is vulnerable to such a challenge.

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stephen Lynch (incumbent) 156,079 68.1%
Republican Vemon Harrison 60,120 26.2%
Independent (politician) Philip Dunkelbarger 12,833 5.6%
Totals 229,032 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[19]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Stephen Lynch (D) $844,965 $1,391,385 $755,272 $0
Vernon McKinley Harrison (R) $5,305 $6,383 $-1,078 $2,207

External links[edit]

District 10[edit]

Ma10 109.gif

This was an open seat. Candidates were Democratic nominee William R. Keating, Republican nominee Jeff Perry, and Independents Maryanne Lewis and Jim Sheets.

Massachusetts's 10th congressional district covers the south-east part of the state, including parts of the South Shore and all of Cape Cod and The Islands. Democrat Bill Delahunt, who has represented the seat since 1997, announced in March 2010 that he did not plan to run for re-election. The Boston Globe, on April 30, 2010, reported that Democratic State Senator Robert O'Leary would announce his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for the seat on the day following.[20] Joseph P. Kennedy III was considered a likely Democratic contender, but he chose not to run.[21] It was reported in the Boston Globe, that District Attorney of Norfolk County William R. Keating also sought635,901 the Democratic nomination for the seat.[22]

Republican Joe Malone, who ran against Ted Kennedy in 1988 and served as State Treasurer from 1991 to 1999, unsuccessfully ran for the seat.[23][24] Republican State Representative Jeff Perry also ran.[25] Despite a movement to draft him into running, Republican State Senator Bob Hedlund decided not to enter this race.[26][27] Ray Kasperowicz of Cohasset had also filed to run as a Republican, but also lost in the primary.[28]

Malone received a donation from US-Cuba Democracy PAC.[29] Perry received donations from the Sandwich and Nantucket Republican Town Committees, the Cape Cod Republican Club, as well as other PACs such as the Committee to Elect Greer Swiston and the Cummings Committee.[29]

Polling[edit]

Poll results of 400 likely voters released October 17, 2010 by WGBH and MassInc. showed Keating with 46%, Perry 43%, undecided 4% and other 5%. The poll claimed a 4.9 percent margin of error.[30]

Poll Source Dates administered Bill Keating (D) Jeff Perry (R) Undecided
Boston Globe/UNH October 17–22, 2010 37% 33% 23%
NMB Research October 20–21, 2010 43% 45% -
MassINC Polling Group October 13–15, 2010 46% 43% 4%
NMB Research October 6–7, 2010 42% 44% -
Massachusetts's 10th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William R. Keating 132,582 46.9%
Republican Jeff Perry 119,820 42.4%
Independent Maryanne Lewis 16,673 5.9%
Independent Jim Sheets 10,438 3.7%
Bring Home Troops Joe Van Nes 3,075 1.1%
Totals 282,588 100%
Voter turnout  %

Campaign financing[edit]

As of October 13, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[31]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
William R. Keating (D) $1,169,722 $945,441 $224,281 $420
Jeff Perry (R) $948,634 $714,930 $233,703 $0
Maryanne Lewis (I) $59,914 $50,516 $9,398 $0
Jim Sheets (I) $47,940 $34,437 $13,502 $0

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2010/2010Stat.htm#stateMA
  2. ^ "2010 Massachusetts State Primary and Election Schedule." Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  3. ^ "2010 State Election Candidates." Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth. Retrieved October 2, 2010.
  4. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 1)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Northampton doctor Jay Fleitman plans to challenge U.S. Rep. Richard Neal for Congress". masslive.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 2)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  7. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 3)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  8. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elepdf/2010_primary_rep_results.pdf
  9. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 4)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  10. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 5)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  11. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 6)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  12. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 7)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  13. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/ele10/state_election_cand_10.htm
  14. ^ Mooney, Brian C. (February 14, 2010). "Poll indicates signs of a GOP resurgence in some N.E. districts." The Boston Globe. Retrieved March 9, 2010.
  15. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 8)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Campaign Website of Mac D'Alessandro". 
  17. ^ by: Mac D'Alessandro. "Mac D'Alessandro for Congress from Massachusetts' 9th district". Blue Mass. Group. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Bernstein, David. 6/3/10. "Poll: Lynch Vulnerable?" Boston Phoenix. Talking Politics blog.". 
  19. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 9)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 
  20. ^ "O'Leary to announce 10th District campaign". The Boston Globe. April 30, 2010. 
  21. ^ Tuohey, Jason (March 4, 2010). "Delahunt will not seek reelection." The Boston Globe. Retrieved March 4, 2010.
  22. ^ Phillips, Frank (March 26, 2010). "Keating would take pension to Congress". The Boston Globe. 
  23. ^ Jessica Taylor (January 23, 2010). "Malone may challenge Delahunt". Politico.com. Retrieved January 24, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Joe Malone For Congress – Massachusetts 10th Congressional District". www.joemalonecongress.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  25. ^ "A Fresh, Dynamic, and Effective New Voice in Washington". Jeff Perry for Congress. August 17, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  26. ^ by cathleen.jeffrey (March 5, 2010). "Hedlund will not run for Delahunt’s seat | The Hull Sun". Blogs.wickedlocal.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Niet compatibele browser". Facebook. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Meet Ray". Ray2010.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  29. ^ a b "2010 Transaction Detail". Fec.gov:80. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  30. ^ Poll: Jeffrey Perry and William Keating in dead heat, George Brennan, Cape Cod Times at The Boston Herald, October 18, 2010
  31. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Massachusetts (District 10)". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 27, 2010. 

External links[edit]

External links[edit]


Preceded by
2008 elections
United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts
2010
Succeeded by
2012 elections