United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2008

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The 2008 congressional elections in Missouri were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Missouri in the United States House of Representatives. The primary election for candidates seeking the nomination of the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, and the Libertarian Party will be held on August 5.

Missouri has nine seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011. The election coincides with the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

The races not forecasted as safe for the incumbent party were 6 and 9; however, the Republicans held both seats.

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2008[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,413,016 50.08% 4
Republican 1,313,018 46.54% 5
Libertarian 82,647 2.93% 0 -
Constitution 12,747 0.45% 0 -
Independents 56 <0.01% 0
Totals 2,821,484 100.00% 9

District 1[edit]

Mo01 109.gif

Incumbent Democratic Congressman William Lacy Clay, Jr. easily dispatched with Libertarian challenger Robb Cunningham in this St. Louis-based liberal district.

Missouri's 1st congressional district election, 2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Lacy Clay, Jr. (inc.) 242,570 86.86%
Libertarian Robb E. Cunningham 36,700 13.14%
Write-ins 7 0.00%
Totals 279,277 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

Missouri's 2nd congressional district.png

Incumbent Republican Congressman Todd Akin easily won re-election to a fifth term over Democratic nominee Bill Haas and Libertarian candidate Thomas Knapp in this conservative district rooted in the northern and western suburbs of St. Louis.

Missouri's 2nd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Todd Akin (inc.) 232,276 62.28%
Democratic Bill Haas 132,068 35.41%
Libertarian Thomas L. Knapp 8,628 2.31%
Totals 372,972 100.00%
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

Mo03 109.gif

In this fairly liberal district based in the southern portion of St. Louis and previously represented by House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, Democratic Congressman Russ Carnahan easily defeated Republican Chris Sander, Libertarian Kevin Babcock, and Constitution Party candidate Cindy Redburn to win a third term.

Missouri's 3rd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Russ Carnahan (inc.) 202,470 66.36%
Republican Chris Sander 92,759 30.41%
Libertarian Kevin C. Babcock 5,518 1.81%
Constitution Cindy Redburn 4,324 1.42%
Totals 305,071 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

Mo04 108.gif

Long-serving incumbent Democratic Congressman Ike Skelton, the Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, easily defeated Republican nominee Jeff Parnell in this conservative, west-central Missouri district to win a seventeenth term.

Missouri's 4th congressional district election, 2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ike Skelton (inc.) 200,009 65.91%
Republican Jeff Parnell 103,446 34.09%
Totals 303,455 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

MO 5th Congressional District.png

Democratic incumbent Congressman Emanuel Cleaver defeated Republican nominee Jacob Turk to win a third term in this fairly liberal district based in Kansas City.

Missouri's 5th congressional district election, 2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Emanuel Cleaver (inc.) 197,249 64.37%
Republican Jacob Turk 109,166 35.63%
Totals 306,415 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

MO-6th.gif

Incumbent Republican Congressman Sam Graves survived a high-profile challenge from Democratic nominee and former Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes by a much healthier margin than expected. Barnes' inability to capitalize on the strong Democratic wave sweeping the country ultimately left her defeated in this normally conservative district based in northwest Missouri.

Missouri's 6th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Graves (inc.) 196,526 59.43%
Democratic Kay Barnes 121,894 36.86%
Libertarian Dave Browning 12,279 3.71%
Totals 330,699 100.00%
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

MO-7th.gif

Incumbent Republican Congressman Roy Blunt, a former short-serving House Majority Leader defeated Democrat Richard Monroe, Libertarian Kevin Craig, and Constitution candidate Travis Maddox to easily win another term in office.

Missouri's 7th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roy Blunt (inc.) 219,016 67.76%
Democratic Richard Monroe 91,010 28.16%
Libertarian Kevin Craig 6,971 2.16%
Constitution Travis Maddox 6,166 1.91%
Write-ins 49 0.02%
Totals 323,212 100.00%
Republican hold

District 8[edit]

MO-8th.gif

In this staunchly conservative district based in southeast Missouri, incumbent Republican Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson had no difficulty in dispatching Democrat Joe Allen, Libertarian Branden McCullough, and Constitution candidate Richard Smith to win another term in office.

Missouri's 8th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Ann Emerson (inc.) 198,798 71.44%
Democratic Joe Allen 72,790 26.16%
Libertarian Branden C. McCullough 4,443 1.60%
Constitution Richard L. Smith 2,257 0.81%
Totals 278,288 100.00%
Republican hold

District 9[edit]

MO-9th.gif

When Republican Congressman Kenny Hulshof declined to seek another term in favor of running for Governor, an open seat emerged. Former Missouri State Representative Blaine Luetkemeyer, the Republican nominee, defeated Democratic nominee Judy Baker, a member of the Missouri House of Representatives by a thin margin in this normally conservative district based in northeast Missouri, a part of "Little Dixie."

Missouri's 9th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer 161,031 49.99%
Democratic Judy Baker 152,956 47.49%
Libertarian Tamara Millay 8,108 2.52%
Totals 322,095 100.00%
Republican hold

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Preceded by
2006 elections
United States House elections in Missouri
2008
Succeeded by
2010 elections