United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 1812

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United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 1812
Pennsylvania
1810 ←
October 13, 1812
→ 1814

All 23[1] Pennsylvania seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Last election 17 1
Seats won 22 1
Seat change Increase 5 Steady

Elections to the United States House of Representatives in Pennsylvania were held October 13, 1812 for the 13th Congress.

Background[edit]

In the previous election, 17 Democratic-Republicans and 1 Federalist had been elected to represent Pennsylvania.

Congressional districts[edit]

Pennsylvania was divided at this time into 15 districts, 9 of which were single-member districts, five of which had two members, and one of which had four members. Following the 1810 Census, Pennsylvania underwent redistricting. Most of the new districts had little correspondence to the former districts, for example, the old 3rd district was divided between the new 2nd, 3rd, and 7th districts. The 1st, 9th and 10th districts were unaltered, except for renumbering of the old 9th and 10th to 13th and 12th respectively, and the addition of a 4th seat to the 1st district.

Election results[edit]

Sixteen incumbents (all Democratic-Republicans) ran for re-election, of whom 14 were re-elected. The incumbents James Milnor (F) of the 1st district and Joseph Lefever (DR) of the old 3rd district did not run for re-election. The two incumbents who lost re-election lost to members of the same party, while six of the seven open seats were won by Democratic-Republicans, a net increase of 5 seats for the Democratic-Republicans and no change for the Federalists.

1812 United States House election results
District Democratic-Republican Federalist Unknown
1st
4 seats
Adam Seybert (I) 7,712 13.7% Joseph Hopkinson 6,421 11.4%
William Anderson (I) 7,697 13.7% Joseph S. Lewis 6,420 11.4%
Charles J. Ingersoll 7,685 13.6% Samuel Harvey 6,415 11.4%
John Conard 7,637 13.5% William Pennock 6,393 11.3%
2nd
2 seats
Roger Davis (I) 5,815 26.2% Samuel Henderson 5,298 23.8%
Jonathan Roberts (I) 5,810 26.1% Francis Gardner 5,295 23.8%
3rd
2 seats
James Whitehill 5,320 27.6% John Gloninger 5,030 26.1%
Jacob Bucher 4,608 23.9% Amos Slaymaker[2] 4,329 22.4%
4th Hugh Glasgow 2,098 58.6% Jacob Eichelberger 1,484 41.4%
5th
2 seats
Robert Whitehill (I) 4,864 27.5% Edward Crawford 4,054 22.9%
William Crawford (I) 4,767 26.9% James Duncan 4,012 22.7%
6th
2 seats
Robert Brown (I) 5,949 30.5% William Rodman (I[3]) 3,744 19.2%
Samuel D. Ingham 5,938 30.4% William Lattimore 3,575 18.3%
Samuel Sitgreaves 328 1.7%
7th John M. Hyneman (I) 2,652 59.4% Daniel Rose 1,810 40.6%
8th William Piper (I) 2,033 63.5% Samuel Riddle 1,171 36.%
9th David Bard (I) 3,779 76.0% John Blair 1,191 24.0%
10th
2 seats
Jared Irwin 3,526 23.4% Nathan Beach 1,303 8.6%
Isaac Smith 3,346 22.2% Enoch Smith 1,301 8.6%
George Smith (I) 2,831 18.8%
Daniel Montgomery 2,765 18.3%
11th William Findley (I) 2,024 55.3% Thomas Pollock 1,636 44.7%
12th Aaron Lyle (I) 2,410 73.5% Joseph Pentecost 823 25.1%
Thomas L. Burch 48 1.5%
13th John Smilie (I) 1,550 60.4% Thomas Meason 1,017 39.6%
14th Adamson Tannehill 1,419 48.0% John Woods 1,162 39.3% John Wilson 374 12.7%
15th Abner Lacock 2,167 62.8% Roger Alden 855 24.8%
Robert Moore 427 12.4%

Special elections[edit]

Special elections for the first session[edit]

Three of the re-elected Representatives did not serve in the 13th Congress, two of whom did not finish their term in the 12th Congress either.[4] John Smilie (DR), re-elected to the 13th district, died on December 30, 1812 and Abner Lacock (DR), re-elected to the 15th district, resigned February 24, 1813 after being elected to the Senate. Smilie was replaced by Isaac Griffin in a special election held February 16, 1813. The only record of that election is a manuscript which indicates he won by a 779-vote majority, but does not record the name(s) of his opponent(s) nor the total number of votes cast. Robert Whitehill (DR) of the 5th district died April 8, 1813.[5] The election in the 5th district was held May 11, 1813 and in the 15th on May 4, 1813

May, 1813 Special election results
District Democratic-Republican Federalist Unknown
5th John Rea 2,534 55.7% Edward Crawford 2,011 44.3%
15th[6] Thomas Wilson 690 78.9% Robert Morse 80 9.1%
Patrick Farrelly 70 8.0% Others 35 4.0%

Neither seat changed political parties, and both took their seats at the beginning of the 1st session of the 13th Congress, which lasted May 24 - August 2, 1813[5]

Special elections for the 2nd session[edit]

John Gloninger (F) of the 3rd district and John M. Hyneman (DR) of the 7th district both resigned August 2, 1813, at the end of the 1st session. They were replaced in special elections held on October 12, 1813

October 12, 1813 Special election results
District Democratic-Republican Federalist Unknown
3rd Edward Crouch 4,550 62.0% William Wallace 2,790 38.0%
5th Daniel Udree 2,016 61.4% David Hottenstein 825 25.1% David Kirby 445 13.5%

Both took their seats December 6, 1813, at the start of the 2nd session. With Crouch's victory in the 3rd district, the sole Federalist-held seat in Pennsylvania changed to Democratic-Republican control, thus Pennsylvania's delegation was completely Democratic-Republican during the 2nd session, which lasted December 6, 1813 - April 18, 1814[5]

Special elections for the third session[edit]

Jonathan Roberts (DR) of the 2nd district resigned February 24, 1814 upon being elected to the Senate and James Whitehill (DR) of the 3rd district resigned September 1, 1814. Both were replaced in a special election held October 11, 1814, the same day as the 1814 congressional elections.

1814 Special election results
District Democratic-Republican Federalist
2nd[7] John Hahn 4,702 49.6% Samuel Henderson 4,773 50.4%
3rd John Whiteside 2,428 44.1% Amos Slaymaker 3,078 55.9%

Both seats changed from Democratic-Republican to Federalist control, so that for the 3rd session, Pennsylvania's delegation was 21 Democratic-Republicans and 2 Federalists.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 5 seats gained in reapportionment
  2. ^ Elected in subsequent special election
  3. ^ Changed parties
  4. ^ 12th Congress membership roster
  5. ^ a b c 13th Congress membership roster
  6. ^ Election details from Ourcampaigns.com
  7. ^ Election details from Ourcampaigns.com