United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2010

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The 2010 congressional elections in Pennsylvania were held on November 2, 2010. Pennsylvania had nineteen seats in the United States House of Representatives. The election was held on the same day as many other PA elections, and the same day as House of Representatives elections in other states. Party primary elections were held May 18, 2010.

Overview[edit]

2010 election results by district
  Democratic hold
  Democratic gain
  Republican hold
  Republican gain
United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania, 2010[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 2,034,145 51.4% 7 12 +5
Democratic 1,882,202 47.5% 12 7 -5
Independent 40,054 1.01% 0 0 0
Totals 3,956,401 100.00% 19 19

Congressional districts[edit]

District 1[edit]

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Brady 149,944 100%
Totals 149,944 100%

Democratic incumbent Bob Brady was the only member of the Pennsylvania delegation who ran unopposed in 2010.

Brady, a long time central figure in the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, has never received less than 74% in a general election, and opponents have had difficult recruiting even moderately electable candidates in this majority-minority district that includes South Philadelphia and some working class suburbs in Delaware County. No Republican has represented this district since 1949. In 2008, he earned 91% of the vote against Mike Muhammad, a teacher who raised no outside funds. Respected for his ability to reach political deals behind the scenes, Brady has garnered an image as an effective politician, and thus has been rarely challenged by other Democrats. In 2010, Pia Varma, a young freelance writer for conservative publications attempted to gain the Republican nomination, but failed to produce enough signatures to appear on the ballot.

District 2[edit]

Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chaka Fattah 182,800 89.3%
Republican Rick Hellberg 21,907 10.7%
Totals 204,707 100%
Voter turnout  %

Democratic incumbent Chaka Fattah ran for re-election. He faced Republican Rick Hellberg (PVS), the CEO of a small financial firm. In 2008, Obama carried this district with 90% of the vote.

Fattah represents one of the top five most Democratic districts in the country, and has never received less than 79% of the vote in his over fifteen year House career. The district includes North Philadelphia and several traditionally liberal suburbs in Montgomery County. Fattah has had the consistent support of the African American community that is the base of a district that hasn't swung Republican since the 1946 elections. Despite this huge Democratic advantage, the district has small pockets of solid Republican territory, and thus Fattah has continuously received GOP opponents (although ones who were unable to raise all more than a few thousand dollars in fundraising), unlike his counterpart in the 1st District. In 2008, Fattah defeated engineer Adam Lang with 81% of the vote.

Fattah won the 2010 general election with 89.3% of the vote.[2]

District 3[edit]

Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Kelly 111,909 55.7%
Democratic Kathy Dahlkemper 88,924 44.3%
Totals 200,833 100%
Voter turnout  %

Democratic incumbent Kathy Dahlkemper unsuccessfully ran for re-election, losing to Republican businessman Mike Kelly (campaign site, PVS, WhoRunsGov), who received 55.7% of the vote.[2] In 2008, McCain carried this district with 49% of the vote.

Dahlkemper faced a difficult reelection bid, in a race that considered a tossup by most political analysts. Dahlkemper became used to tight campaigns in her short political career. A political unknown prior to her 2008 campaign, Dahlkemper leveraged a moderate, blue collar image that enticed Democratic voters in a district this is generally pro-union, with a center-right tilt on social issues. Dahlkemper, the owner of a large landscaping business and manager of an Erie County arboretum, came from behind to defeat Erie County Concilman Kyle Foust, the endorsed Democratic candidate. She then went on to narrowly unseat (with 52% of the vote) Congressman Phil English, a moderate Republican who had maintained good relations with labor, by attacking his ties to the Bush administration and for failing to follow through on a promise to retire after six terms. During her first term, Dahlkemper has served as a member of the Blue Dog Coalition of conservative Democrats, which has allowed her to keep a middle ground image. However, her vote in favor of healthcare legislation and the lack of an entrenched image in certain corners of the district left her vulnerable.

In 2010, Dahlkemper faced a primary challenge from former foreign affairs official Mel Marin, winning with 73% of the vote. Republicans focused heavily on regaining the seat, and six GOP candidates earned spots on the ballot: automobile dealer Mike Kelly, manufacturing executive Paul Huber, pharmaceutical representative Clayton Grabb, physician Steve Fisher, factory foreman Ed Franz, and accountant Martha Moore. Kelly and Huber far outraised the remaining four challengers, and they became entangled in an expensive campaign. Kelly was eventually victorious, winning 28% of the vote to Huber's 27% in the factious affair.

Kelly, a former member of the Butler City Council, had a base of support in the heavily Republican Butler County, while Dahlkemper was well known in Erie, the center of population for the district. Other small cities in the district, such as Sharon and Meadville were swing regions, with a slightly conservative tilt that balanced out strongly Democratic Erie. John McCain carried the 3rd District by a 49%-48% margin, which reflects the political balance of the area.

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Kathy Dahlkemper (D) Mike Kelly (R) Undecided
The Hill/ANG Alliance September 25–27, 2010 401 ± 4.9% 36% 49% 15%
Franklin-Marshall September 14–19, 2010 482 ± 4.5% 38% 44% 18%
The Polling Company July 29-August 1, 2010 314 ± 5.5% 46% 42% 11%

District 4[edit]

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jason Altmire 120,827 50.8%
Republican Keith Rothfus 116,958 49.2%
Totals 237,785 100%
Voter turnout  %

Democratic incumbent Jason Altmire ran for re-election and faced Republican attorney Keith Rothfus (campaign website, PVS). In 2008, McCain carried this district with 55% of the vote.

Altmire narrowly won re-elected with 50.8% of the vote.[2]

District 5[edit]

Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glenn Thompson 127,427 68.7%
Democratic Michael Pipe 52,375 28.2%
Libertarian Vernon Etzel 5,710 3.1%
Totals 185,512 100%

Republican incumbent Glenn "G.T." Thompson successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Michael Pipe (campaign website, PVS) and Libertarian Vernon Etzel (PVS). In 2008, McCain carried this district with 55% of the vote.

District 6[edit]

Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Gerlach 133,770 57.1%
Democratic Manan Trivedi 100,493 42.9%
Totals 234,263 100%

Republican incumbent Jim Gerlach successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Iraq War veteran Manan Trivedi (campaign website, PVS). In 2008, Obama carried this district with 58% of the vote.

District 7[edit]

Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pat Meehan 134,751 54.9%
Democratic Bryan Lentz 108,197 44.1%
Independent Jim Schneller 2,670 1.1%
Totals 245,618 100%
Voter turnout  %

Democratic incumbent Joe Sestak retired to run for the U.S. Senate. Democratic nominee State Representative Bryan Lentz faced Republican nominee U.S. Attorney Pat Meehan and American Constitution Party (independent) nominee Jim Schneller (campaign site, PVS).

District 8[edit]

Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Fitzpatrick 130,759 53.5%
Democratic Patrick Murphy 113,547 46.5%
Totals 244,306 100%
Voter turnout  %

Democratic incumbent Patrick Murphy unsuccessfully ran for re-election. He was defeated by Republican former U.S. Congressman Mike Fitzpatrick. In 2008, Obama carried this district with 54% of the vote.

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Patrick Murphy (D) Mike Fitzpatrick (R) Undecided
Franklin-Marshall September 14–19, 2010 464 ± 4.6% 35% 49% 15%
Franklin-Marshall October 14–19, 2010 464 ± 4.6% 40% 47% 5%
Franklin-Marshall October 24–29, 2010 464 ± 4.6% 35% 55% 5%

District 9[edit]

Pennsylvania's 9th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Shuster 141,904 73.1%
Democratic Tom Conners 52,322 26.9%
Totals 194,226 100%

Republican incumbent Bill Shuster successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Tom Conners (campaign website, PVS) and Independent Chad Clopper (campaign website).

District 10[edit]

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Marino 110,599 55.2%
Democratic Chris Carney 89,846 44.8%
Totals 200,445 100%

Democratic incumbent Chris Carney unsuccessfully ran for re-election, losing to Republican nominee U.S. Attorney Tom Marino. In 2008, McCain carried this district with 54% of the vote.

District 11[edit]

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lou Barletta 102,179 54.7%
Democratic Paul Kanjorski 84,618 45.3%
Totals 186,797 100%

Democratic incumbent Paul E. Kanjorski unsuccessfully ran for re-election, losing to Republican Hazleton Mayor Lou Barletta.[3] In 2008, Obama carried this district with 57% of the vote.

Kanjorski faced Corey O'Brien and Brian Kelly in the May 2010 Democratic primary, and won with 49.3% of the primary vote.

District 12[edit]

Special election[edit]

Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district special election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Critz 72,218 52.6%
Republican Tim Burns 61,722 45.0%
Libertarian Demo Agoris 3,249 2.4%
Totals 137,189 100%

General election[edit]

Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Critz 94,056 50.8%
Republican Tim Burns 91,170 49.2%
Totals 185,226 100%

Democrat Mark Critz won a May 2010 special election to replace John Murtha, who served the district for 36 years. He faced Republican businessman Tim Burns. Critz again defeated Burns in the regularly scheduled November general election. In 2008, McCain carried this district with 49% of the vote.

District 13[edit]

Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Allyson Schwartz 118,710 56.3%
Republican Dee Adcock 91,987 43.7%
Totals 210,697 100%

Democratic incumbent Allyson Schwartz successfully ran for re-election. She defeated Republican Dee Adcock (campaign website, PVS). Obama carried this district with 59% of the vote.

District 14[edit]

Pennsylvania's 14th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Doyle 122,073 68.8%
Republican Melissa Haluszczak 49,997 28.2%
Green Ed Bortz 5,400 3.0%
Totals 177,470 100%

Democratic incumbent Mike Doyle successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Republican Melissa Haluszczak (campaign website, PVS) and Green Party nominee Ed Bortz (campaign site, PVS). In 2008, Doyle received 91% of the vote and Obama carried this district with 70% of the vote.

District 15[edit]

Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charlie Dent 109,534 53.6%
Democratic John B. Callahan 79,766 39.0%
Independent Jake Towne 15,248 7.5%
Totals 204,548 100%
Voter turnout  %

Republican incumbent Charlie Dent successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Bethlehem Mayor John B. Callahan and Independent Jake Towne (campaign site, PVS). In 2008, Obama carried this district with 56% of the vote.

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
John Callahan (D) Charlie Dent (R) Jake Towne (I) Undecided
Morning Call/Muhlenberg September 11–15, 2010 496 ± 5.0% 38% 49% 3% 10%

District 16[edit]

Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Pitts 134,113 65.4%
Democratic Lois Herr 70,994 34.6%
Totals 205,107 100%

Republican incumbent Joe Pitts successfully ran for re-election. He again defeated Democratic nominee Lois Herr. In 2008, McCain carried the district with 51% of the vote.

District 17[edit]

Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tim Holden 118,486 55.5%
Republican Dave Argall 95,000 44.5%
Totals 213,486 100%

Democratic incumbent Tim Holden successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Republican State Senator Dave Argall. In 2008, McCain carried this district with 51% of the vote.

District 18[edit]

Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Murphy 161,888 67.3%
Democratic Dan Connolly 78,558 32.7%
Totals 240,446 100%

Republican incumbent Tim Murphy successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Dan Connolly (campaign website, PVS). In 2008, McCain carried this district with 55% of the vote.

District 19[edit]

Pennsylvania's 19th congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Todd Platts 165,219 71.9%
Democratic Ryan Sanders 53,549 23.3%
Independence Joshua Monighan 10,988 4.8%
Totals 229,756 100%

Republican incumbent Todd Platts successfully ran for re-election. He defeated Democrat Ryan Sanders (campaign website, PVS) and Independence Party nominee Joshua Monighan (campaign site, PVS).[4][5] In 2008, McCain carried this district with 56% of the vote.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives
  2. ^ a b c "2010 General Election - Representative in Congress". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2010. Retrieved 2013-05-18. 
  3. ^ Kanjorski wins easily; eyes Barletta rematch, The Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, PA, Timesleader.com. Retrieved on 2010-07-12.
  4. ^ "Pennsylvania Primary Results". Fox News. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Congressional, Presidential and Political News, Blogs, Member Profiles". CQ Politics. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 

External links[edit]