United States House of Representatives elections, 1800

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United States House of Representatives elections, 1800
United States
1798 ←
April 29, 1800 - August 1, 1801
→ 1802

All 106 seats to the United States House of Representatives
54 seats were needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  NC-Congress-NathanielMacon.jpg BayardJames ASr.jpg
Leader Nathaniel Macon James A. Bayard
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Leader's seat North Carolina-5th Delaware-AL
Last election 46 60
Seats won 68 38
Seat change Increase 22 Decrease 22

Speaker before election

Theodore Sedgwick
Federalist

Elected Speaker

Nathaniel Macon
Democratic-Republican

Elections to the United States House of Representatives for the 7th Congress in 1800 and 1801, at the same time as the 1800 presidential election, in which Vice President Thomas Jefferson, a Democratic Republican, defeated incumbent President John Adams, a Federalist.

These elections resulted in the Democratic-Republicans picking up 22 seats from the Federalists. This brought the Democratic-Republicans a solid majority of 68 seats, whereas the Federalists were only able to secure 38. Many state legislatures also changed to Democratic-Republican control, with the result that many new Democratic-Republicans were voted into the Senate. The Federalists never again succeeded in gaining a majority of seats in the House of Representatives, and it was soon normal for them to control fewer than a third of the seats until the national Federalist party disintegrated completely in the early 1820s.

The victory of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans can be attributed partially to unpopular policies pursued by the Adams administration, including the Alien and Sedition Acts, which sought to curtail guarantees of freedom of speech and freedom of the press spelled out in the Bill of Rights.

The difference between Federalist policies in support of a strong national government and the Democratic-Republican preference for states' rights played a prominent role in the election. Federal taxation became an issue as Southerners and Westerners rejected federal taxes levied on property.[citation needed]

Election summaries[edit]

68 38
Democratic-Republican Federalist
State Type Date Total
seats
Democratic-
Republican
Federalist
Seats Change Seats Change
Connecticut At-large September 22, 1800 7 0 Steady 7 Steady
Delaware At-large October 7, 1800 1 0 Steady 1 Steady
Georgia At-large October 6, 1800 2 2 Increase2 0 Decrease2
Massachusetts District (14) November 3, 1800[1] 14 7 Increase5 7 Decrease5
New Hampshire At-large August 25, 1800 4 0 Steady 4 Steady
New Jersey At-large[2] December 24, 1800 5 5 Increase2 0 Decrease2
New York District (10) April 29-May 1, 1800 10 6 Steady 4 Steady
North Carolina District (10) August 15, 1800 10 6 Steady 4 Steady
Pennsylvania District (12[3]) October 14, 1800 13 10 Increase2 3 Decrease2
Rhode Island At-large August 26, 1800[4] 2 2 Increase2 0 Decrease2
South Carolina District (6) October 24, 1800 6 3 Increase2 3 Decrease2
Vermont District (2) September 2, 1800[5] 2 1 Steady 1 Steady
1801 elections
Kentucky District (2) August 3, 1801 2 2 Steady 0 Steady
Maryland District (8) January 1, 1801 8 5 Increase2 3 Decrease2
Tennessee At-large August 4, 1801 1 1 Steady 0 Steady
Virginia District (19) April 23, 1801 19 18 Increase5 1 Decrease5
Total 106 68
64.2%
Increase22 38
35.8%
Decrease22
House seats
D-R
  
64.15%
Federalist
  
35.85%

Complete returns[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[6]
Connecticut at-large
7 seats on a general ticket
William Edmond Federalist 1797 (special) Re-elected Samuel W. Dana (F) 11.1%
Roger Griswold (F) 10.9%
John Cotton Smith[7] (F) 10.8%
William Edmond (F) 10.4%
Elizur Goodrich (F) 10.2%
John Davenport (F) 9.3%
Elias Perkins (F) 8.6%

Calvin Goddard[8] (F) 5.7%
Benjamin Talmadge[8] (F) 5.3%
Simeon Baldwin (F) 5.2%
Timothy Pitkin (F) 3.8%
William Moseley (F) 2.7%
Epaphroditus Champion (F) 2.3%
Chauncey Goodrich (F) 1.7%
Jonathan Brace (F) 1.0%
William Hart (DR) 0.8%
Gideon Granger (DR) 0.4%
Sylvester Gilbert (DR) 0.1%
Chauncey Goodrich Federalist 1794 Lost re-election
Federalist hold
Previous incumbent Jonathan Brace (F) resigned in 1800 Federalist hold
Roger Griswold Federalist 1794 Re-elected
Elizur Goodrich Federalist 1798 Re-elected
John Davenport Federalist 1798 Re-elected
Samuel W. Dana Federalist 1796 Re-elected

William Edmond (F) and Elizur Goodrich (F) both declined to serve another term and were replaced by Calvin Goddard (F) and Benjamin Talmadge (F)

Delaware[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Delaware at-large James A. Bayard Federalist 1796 Re-elected James A. Bayard (F) 53.4%
John Patten (DR) 46.6%

Georgia[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Georgia at-large
2 seats on a general ticket
James Jones Federalist 1798 Re-elected
as Democratic-Republican
James Jones (DR[9]) 47.9%
Benjamin Taliaferro (DR[9]) 42.1%

Francis Willis (DR) 10.0%
Benjamin Taliaferro Federalist 1798 Re-elected
as Democratic-Republican

James Jones (DR) died on January 11, 1801 and was replaced in a special election by John Milledge (DR)

Milledge subsequently resigned in 1802 upon being elected Governor of Georgia and was replaced by Peter Early. Benjamin Taliaferro (DR) also resigned in 1802 to be replaced by David Meriwether (DR)

Kentucky[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Kentucky 1
Known as the Southern district
Thomas T. Davis Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Thomas T. Davis (DR) 78.8%
John Pope (DR) 21.2%
Kentucky 2
Known as the Northern district
John Fowler Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected John Fowler (DR) 67.9%
William Garrard 19.4%
Philemon Thomas 12.8%

Maryland[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Maryland 1 George Dent Federalist 1792 Retired
Federalist hold
John Campbell (F) 76.6%
Frances Digges (DR) 23.4%
Maryland 2 John C. Thomas Federalist 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Richard Sprigg, Jr. (DR) 65.0%
John C. Thomas (F) 35.0%
Maryland 3 William Craik Federalist 1796 (special) Retired
Federalist hold
Thomas Plater (F) 53.1%
Patrick Magruder (DR) 46.9%
Maryland 4 George Baer, Jr. Federalist 1796 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Daniel Hiester (DR) 57.4%
Eli Williams (F) 42.6%
Maryland 5 Samuel Smith Democratic-Republican 1792 Re-elected Samuel Smith[10] (DR)
Charles Ridgely (F)
Maryland 6 Gabriel Christie Democratic-Republican 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Archer (DR) 95.7%
John Carlisle (F) 3.9%
Philip Thomas (F) 0.4%
Maryland 7 Joseph H. Nicholson Democratic-Republican 1798 (special) Re-elected Joseph H. Nicholson (DR) 99.7%
Solomon Jones 0.3%
Maryland 8 John Dennis Federalist 1796 Re-elected John Dennis (F) 89.4%
William Polk (DR) 10.6%

Richard Sprigg, Jr. (DR) of the 2nd district resigned February 11, 1802, and was replaced in a special election by Walter Bowie (DR)

Massachusetts[edit]

Massachusetts' electoral law required a majority for election, which was not met in the 1st and 6th districts, necessitating a second trial.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
First ballot Second ballot
Massachusetts 1
Known as the 1st Western district
Theodore Sedgwick Federalist 1798 Democratic-Republican gain John Bacon (DR) 49.3%
Ephraim Williams (F) 49.1%
Scattering 1.6%
John Bacon (DR) 59.0%
Ephraim Williams (F) 41.0%
Massachusetts 2
Known as the 2nd Western district
William Shepard Federalist 1796 Re-elected William Shepard (F) 73.4%
William Lyman 12.9%
Scattiner 13.8%
Massachusetts 3
Known as the 3rd Western district
Samuel Lyman Federalist 1794 Federalist hold Ebenezer Mattoon[7] (F) 75.9%
Thomas Dwight (DR) 14.6%
Daniel Bigelow 4.9%
Scattering 4.6%
Massachusetts 4
Known as the 4th Western district
Previous incumbent Dwight Foster (F) was elected to the Senate June 6, 1800 Democratic-Republican hold Levi Lincoln, Sr.[7] (DR) 52.8%
Jabez Upham 41.5%
Salem Towne (F) 3.8%
Seth Hastings (F) 1.9%
Massachusetts 5
Known as the 1st Southern district
Lemuel Williams Federalist 1798 Re-elected Lemuel Williams (F) 61.9%
Isaiah L. Green (DR) 26.6%
Isaiah Coffin (DR) 11.5%
Massachusetts 6
Known as the 2nd Southern district
John Reed, Sr. Federalist 1794 Democratic-Republican gain Nahum Mitchell (F) 36.2%
Josiah Smith (DR) 32.7%
Samuel Niles (DR) 8.9%
Benjamin Whiteman (F) 6.9%
Nathaniel Goodwin (F) 5.9%
Daniel Snow (DR) 3.6%
Scattering 5.9%
Josiah Smith (DR) 50.7%
Nahum Mitchell (F) 45.4%
Samuel Niles (DR) 3.9%
Massachusetts 7
Known as the 3rd Southern district
Phanuel Bishop Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Phanuel Bishop (DR) 57.6%
Elisha May (F) 25.7%
Stephen Bullock (DR[9]) 9.9%
Laban Wheaton (F) 6.9%
Massachusetts 8
Known as the 1st Middle district
Harrison Gray Otis Federalist 1796 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
William Eustis (DR) 52.9%
Josiah Quincy (F) 47.1%
Massachusetts 9
Known as the 2nd Middle district
Joseph Bradley Varnum Democratic-Republican 1794 Re-elected Joseph Bradley Varnum (DR) 71.8%
Timothy Bigelow (F) 27.2%
Others 1.0%
Massachusetts 10
Known as the 3rd Middle district
Previous incumbent Samuel Sewall (F) had been appointed as judge to Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court January 10, 1800 Federalist hold Nathan Read[7] (F) 55.0%
Jacob Crowninshield (DR) 44.0%
Massachusetts 11
Known as the 4th Middle district
Bailey Bartlett Federalist 1797 (special) Retired
Federalist hold
Manasseh Cutler (F) 75.5%
Thomas Kitteridge (DR) 21.4%
Others 3.1%
District of Maine Massachusetts 12
Known as the 1st Eastern district
Silas Lee Federalist 1798 Re-elected Silas Lee (F) 50.8%
Henry Dearborn (DR) 45.6%
Scattering 3.6%
Massachusetts 13
Known as the 2nd Eastern district
Peleg Wadsworth Federalist 1792 Re-elected Peleg Wadsworth (F) 76.8%
John Chandler (DR) 14.1%
Stephen Longfellow (F)
Scattering 4.7%
Massachusetts 14
Known as the 3rd Eastern district
George Thatcher Federalist 1788 Re-elected George Thatcher (F) 61.8%
Richard Cutts (DR) 38.2%

In the 14th district, George Thatcher (F) declined to serve in the 8th Congress. A special election was held to fill the resulting vacancy, which was won by Richard Cutts (DR). At the time Thatcher left office, he was the last member of the House to have served continuously from the 1st Congress.

In the 4th district, Levi Lincoln, Sr. (DR) resigned upon being appointed United States Attorney General March 5, 1801 and was replaced in a special election by Seth Hastings (F).

In the 12th district, Silas Lee (F) Resigned August 20, 1801 and was replaced in a a special election by Samuel Thatcher (DR)

New Hampshire[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New Hampshire at-large
4 seats on a general ticket
James Sheafe Federalist 1799 (special) Retired
Federalist hold
Abiel Foster (F) 19.3%
Samuel Tenney[7] (F) 17.7%
George B. Upham (F) 16.5%
Joseph Peirce (F) 14.9%

Nahum Parker (DR) 6.3%
John Goddard (DR) 5.5%
Joseph Badger (DR) 4.9%
Ezra Bartlett (DR) 4.1%
Michael McClary 2.5%
Thomas Cogswell 1.7%
Scattering 6.7%
Jonathan Freeman Federalist 1796 Retired
Federalist hold
Previous incumbent William Gordon (F) resigned to accept position as New Hampshire Attorney General Federalist hold
Abiel Foster Federalist 1794 Re-elected

Joseph Peirce (F) resigned in 1802, and a special election was held to fill the resulting vacancy, won by Samuel Hunt

New Jersey[edit]

In 1800, New Jersey returned to its traditional at-large district, continued to use this system to select representatives until it was abolished in 1842, with a single exception in 1813.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New Jersey at-large
5 seats on a general ticket
John Condit
Redistricted from the 1st district
Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected James Mott (DR) 10.3%
Ebenezer Elmer (DR) 10.2%
John Condit (DR) 10.2%
William Helms (DR) 10.2%
Henry Southard (DR) 10.1%

Aaron Ogden (F) 9.9%
Peter DeVroom (F) 9.8%
James H. Imlay (F) 9.8%
Franklin Davenport (F) 49.8%
William Coxe (F) 9.8%
Aaron Kitchell
Redistricted from the 2nd district
Democratic-Republican 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
James Linn
Redistricted from the 3rd district
Democratic-Republican 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
James H. Imlay
Redistricted from the 4th district
Federalist 1797 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Franklin Davenport
Redistricted from the 5th district
Federalist 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain

New York[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
New York 1 John Smith Democratic-Republican 1799 (special) Re-elected John Smith (DR) 56.0%
Silas Wood (F) 44.0%
New York 2 Edward Livingston Democratic-Republican 1794 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Samuel L. Mitchill (DR) 51.0%
Jacob Morton (F) 49.0%
New York 3 Philip Van Courtlandt Democratic-Republican 1793 Re-elected Philip Van Courtlandt (DR) 59.7%
Samuel Bayard (F) 40.3%
New York 4 Lucas C. Elmendorf Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Lucas C. Elmendorf (DR) 60.0%
John Hathorn (DR) 36.8%
Leonard Bronk (F) 3.2%
New York 5 Theodorus Bailey Democratic-Republican 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Thomas Tillotson (DR) 61.6%
David Brooks (F) 38.4%
New York 6 John Bird Federalist 1798 Re-elected John Bird (F) 53.4%
Henry W. Livingston (DR) 45.5%
John Woodworth (DR) 1.1%
New York 7 John Thompson Democratic-Republican 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican hold
David Thomas (DR) 50.8%
John Williams (F) 47.8%
John Thompson (DR) 1.3%
New York 8 Henry Glen Federalist 1793 Lost re-election
Federalist hold
Killian K. Van Rensselaer (F) 50.3%
George Tiffany (DR) 40.8%
Henry Glen (F) 8.9%
New York 9 Jonas Platt Federalist 1798 Retired
Federalist hold
Benjamin Walker (F) 64.3%
Jacob Eaker (DR) 34.5%
Scattering 1.2%
New York 10 William Cooper Federalist 1798 Retired
Federalist hold
Thomas Morris (F) 54.3%
William Stuart (DR) 39.6%
John Paterson (DR) 4.4%
Scattering 1.8%

There were three vacancies during the 7th Congress. The first was in the 6th district when John Bird (F) resigned on July 25, 1801. A special election was held to fill the resulting vacancy, electing John P. Van Ness (DR). The second occurred in the 5th district when Thomas Tillotson (DR) was appointed Secretary of State of New York and resigned his seat August 10, 1801. A special election was held to fill the resulting vacancy, resulting in Theodorus Bailey (DR) taking the seat back. The third and last vacancy occurred in the 6th district when Thomas Jefferson named John P. Van Ness (DR) as a major in the militia of the Territory of Columbia. His seat was declared vacant January 17, 1801, and was left unfilled for the remainder of the 7th Congress.

North Carolina[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
North Carolina 1 Joseph Dickson Federalist 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
James Holland (DR) 60.9%
Joseph Dickson (F) 38.1%
North Carolina 2 Archibald Henderson Federalist 1798 Re-elected Archibald Henderson (F) 49.3%
Musendine Matthews (F) 29.0%
Matthew Locke (DR) 21.7%
North Carolina 3 Robert Williams Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Robert Williams (DR) 75.1%
John Hamilton (F) 24.9%
North Carolina 4 Richard Stanford Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Richard Stanford (DR) 61.6%
William Strudwick (F) 38.4%
North Carolina 5 Nathaniel Macon Democratic-Republican 1791 Re-elected Nathaniel Macon (DR) 97.4%
Scattering 2.6%
North Carolina 6 William H. Hill Federalist 1798 Re-elected William H. Hill (F) 65.2%
James Gillespie (DR) 34.8%
North Carolina 7 William Barry Grove Federalist 1791 Re-elected William Barry Grove (F) 77.8%
Samuel D. Purviance (DR) 22.2%
North Carolina 8 David Stone Federalist 1798 Re-elected David Stone[10] (F)
John H. Jaycocks (F)
John White
North Carolina 9 Willis Alston Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Willis Alston (DR) 58.1%
Thomas Blount (DR) 41.9%
North Carolina 10 Richard Dobbs Spaight Democratic-Republican 1798 Lost re-election
Federalist gain
John Stanly (F) 60.1%
Richard Dobbs Spaight (DR) 39.9%

Two vacancies occurred during the 7th Congress, both in the 8th district. The first occurred before the meeting of the Congress when David Stone (F) was elected to the Senate and was won by Charles Johnson (DR) The second vacancy occurred when Johnson died on July 23, 1802, the resulting vacancy was won by Thomas Wynns (DR).

Pennsylvania[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[11]
Pennsylvania 1 Robert Waln Federalist 1798 (Special) Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
William Jones (DR) 50.2%
Francis Gurney (F) 49.8%
Pennsylvania 2 Michael Leib Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Michael Leib (DR) 77.8%
John Lardner (F) 22.2%
Pennsylvania 3 Richard Thomas Federalist 1794 Retired
Federalist hold
Joseph Hemphill (F) 53.3%
Joseph Shallcroft (DR) 46.7%
Pennsylvania 4
Plural district with 2 seats
Peter Muhlenberg Democratic-Republican 1798 Re-elected Peter Muhlenberg (DR) 34.4%
Robert Brown (DR) 34.4%

Cawallader C. Evans (F) 15.6%
John Arndt (F) 15.5%
Robert Brown Democratic-Republican 1798 (Special) Re-elected
Pennsylvania 5 Joseph Hiester Democratic-Republican 1797 (Special) Re-elected Joseph Hiester (DR) 83.2%
Roswell Wells (F) 16.8%
Pennsylvania 6 John A. Hanna Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected John A. Hanna (DR) 74.6%
Samuel Maclay (F) 25.4%
Pennsylvania 7 John W. Kittera Federalist 1791 Retired
Federalist hold
Thomas Boude (F) 54.1%
John Whitehill (DR) 45.9%
Pennsylvania 8 Thomas Hartley Federalist 1788 Died
Democratic-Republican gain
John Stewart (DR) 54.8%[7]
John Eddie (F) 45.2%
Pennsylvania 9 Andrew Gregg Democratic-Republican 1791 Re-elected Andrew Gregg (DR) 72.6%
David Mitchell (F) 27.4%
Pennsylvania 10 Henry Woods Federalist 1798 Re-elected Henry Woods (F) 53.6%
David Bard (DR) 46.4%
Pennsylvania 11 John Smilie Democratic-Republican 1792
1798
Re-elected John Smilie (DR) 100%
Pennsylvania 12 Albert Gallatin Democratic-Republican 1794 Re-elected Albert Gallatin (DR) 72.9%
Presley Neville (F) 27.1%

Peter Muhlenberg (DR) of the 4th district was elected to the Senate before the start of the 7th Congress and was replaced in a special election by Isaac Van Horne (DR)

Albert Gallatin (DR) of the 12th district was appointed Secretary of the Treasury in May, 1801, and was replaced in a special election by William Hoge (DR)

Rhode Island[edit]

In 1800, Rhode Island switched to a general ticket for its two seats, instead of electing each one separately. Only one candidate received a majority, requiring a run-off election to choose a Representative for the second seat.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[12]
First ballot Second ballot
Rhode Island at-large
2 seats on a general ticket
John Brown Federalist 1798 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Thomas Tillinghast (DR) 40.2%
Joseph Stanton, Jr. (DR) 24.0%
Richard Jackson, Jr. (F) 19.9%
Asher Robbins (F) 12.9%
John Brown (F) 2.2%
Joseph Stanton, Jr. (DR) 61.4%
Thomas Noyes (F) 38.6%
Christopher G. Champlin Federalist 1796 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain

South Carolina[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
South Carolina 1
Also known as the Charleston District
Thomas Pinckney Federalist 1797 (special) Retired
Federalist hold
Thomas Lowndes (F) 87.0%[13]
Robert Simons (DR) 13.0%
South Carolina 2
Also known as the Beaufort District
John Rutledge, Jr. Federalist 1796 Re-elected John Rutledge, Jr. (F) 60.3%
Charles J. Colcock (DR) 39.7%
South Carolina 3
Also known as the Georgetown District
Benjamin Huger Federalist 1798 Re-elected Benjamin Huger (F) 54.5%
Lemuel Benton (DR) 45.1%
Tristam Thomas 0.4%
South Carolina 4
Also known as the Camden District
Thomas Sumter Democratic-Republican 1796 Re-elected Thomas Sumter (DR) 63.3%
Richard Winn (F) 32.6%
William Bracey (F) 4.1%
South Carolina 5
Also known as the Ninety-Six District
Robert Goodloe Harper Federalist 1794 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
William Butler, Sr. (DR) 63.9%
John Nicholls (F) 31.0%
Charles Goodwyn (F) 5.1%
South Carolina 6
Also known as the Washington District
Abraham Nott Federalist 1798 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
Thomas Moore (DR) 50.7%
William Smith (DR) 49.3%

In the 4th district, Thomas Sumter (DR) resigned on December 15, 1801 upon being elected to the Senate. A special election was held to fill the vacancy, which elected Richard Winn (DR)

Tennessee[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Tennessee at-large William C. C. Claiborne Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected William C. C. Claiborne (DR) 86.3%
John Rhea (DR) 13.6%

Claiborne did not serve in the 7th Congress as he was appointed Governor of Mississippi Territory and was replaced in a special election by William Dickson (DR)

Vermont[edit]

Vermont electoral law required a candidate to win a majority to take office, necessitating a run-off election in the 2nd (Eastern) district.

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates[12]
First ballot Second ballot
Vermont 1
Known as the Western district
Matthew Lyon Democratic-Republican 1796 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Israel Smith (DR) 63.5%
Daniel Chipman (F) 34.8%
Amos March 1.8%
Vermont 2
Known as the Eastern district
Lewis R. Morris Federalist 1797 (special) Re-elected Lewis R. Morris (F) 24.9%
Nathaniel Niles (DR) 24.7%
Amasa Paine (F) 15.6%
Stephen Jacobs (F) 11.3%
William Chamberlain (F) 10.6%
Stephen R. Bradley 7.3%
Lot Hall (F) 5.5%
Lewis R. Morris (F) 55.7%
Nathaniel Niles (DR) 25.4%
Amasa Paine (F) 12.4%
William Chamberlain (F) 4.5%
Others 2.0%

Virginia[edit]

District Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Virginia 1 Robert Page Federalist 1799 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
John Smith (DR) 59.3%
Phillip C. Pendleton (F) 40.7%
Virginia 2 David Holmes Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected David Holmes[10] (DR)
Alexander Sinclair (F)
Virginia 3 George Jackson Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected George Jackson[10] (DR)
Jonathan J. Jacobs (F)
Skidmore[14] (F)
Virginia 4 Abram Trigg Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected Abram Trigg[10] (DR)
Virginia 5 John J. Trigg Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected John J. Trigg[10] (DR)
Virginia 6 Matthew Clay Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected Matthew Clay[10] (DR)
Virginia 7 John Randolph Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected John Randolph[10] (DR)
Virginia 8 Samuel Goode Federalist 1799 Democratic-Republican gain Thomas Claiborne[10] (DR)
Virginia 9 Joseph Eggleston Democratic-Republican 1798 (special) Democratic-Republican hold William B. Giles[10] (DR)
Virginia 10 Edwin Gray Democratic-Republican 1799 Re-elected Edwin Gray[10] (DR)
Nicholas Faulcon (DR)
Virginia 11 Josiah Parker Federalist 1789 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Thomas Newton, Jr. (DR) 93.6%
John Niveson (F) 5.7%
Josiah Parker (F) 0.7%
Virginia 12 Thomas Evans Federalist 1797 Retired
Federalist hold
John Stratton[10] (F)
John Page (DR)
Virginia 13 Littleton Waller Tazewell Democratic-Republican 1800 (special) Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
John Clopton[10] (DR)
Samuel Tyler (DR)
Virginia 14 Samuel J. Cabell Democratic-Republican 1795 Re-elected Samuel J. Cabell[10] (DR)
Virginia 15 John Dawson Democratic-Republican 1797 Re-elected John Dawson[10] (DR)
Virginia 16 Anthony New Democratic-Republican 1793 Re-elected Anthony New[10] (DR)
Carter Braxton
James M. Garnett (DR)
Tunstall Banks
Andrew Monroe
Richard Banks
Archibald Petetrie
Virginia 17 Leven Powell Federalist 1799 Lost re-election
Democratic-Republican gain
Richard Brent[10] (DR)
Leven Powell (F)
Joseph Lane
Samuel Clapham
Virginia 18 John Nicholas Democratic-Republican 1793 Retired
Democratic-Republican hold
Philip R. Thompson[10] (DR)
John Blackwell (F)
Virginia 19 Henry Lee Federalist 1799 Retired
Democratic-Republican gain
John Taliaferro (DR) 63.0%
John Taylor (F) 37.0%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Majority required for election, a second trial had to be held in two districts on March 9, 1801
  2. ^ Changed from district method
  3. ^ Includes 1 plural district
  4. ^ Majority required for election, necessitating a second trial for one seat
  5. ^ Majority required for election, which was not met in one district. A second trial was held on December 2, 1800
  6. ^ Between the two sources used, there is disagreement over the ordering of the candidates. Both sources have the same numbers of votes recorded, but disagree on which candidates received those votes, one source lists Goddard as 8th, Talmadge as 9th, etc., as listed here, while the other has them as 11th, 12th, etc., three places off for all of them until the bottom three listed here which are moved up to 8th-10th, suggesting that one of the two sources accidentally misplaced three names on the list. I used the ordering that placed Goddard and Talmadge in 8th and 9th place as it seemed more likely that they'd been at the top of the runners-up given that they were subsequently elected to fill vacancies in the 7th Congress
  7. ^ a b c d e f Also elected to fill vacancy in 6th Congress
  8. ^ a b Elected in subsequent special election
  9. ^ a b c Changed parties
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Source does not give numbers of votes or has incomplete data
  11. ^ Wilkes University Elections Statistics Project
  12. ^ a b Only candidates with at least 1% of the vote listed
  13. ^ Percent based no incomplete records
  14. ^ Source did not give full name

External links[edit]