United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2014

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United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2014
Texas
2012 ←
November 4, 2014 → 2016

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Seats before 24 12
Seats won 25 11
Seat change Increase1 Decrease1
Popular vote 2,564,228 1,471,518
Percentage 59.2% 33.9%
Swing Increase1.5% Decrease4.5%

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas will be held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a gubernatorial election and an election to the U.S. Senate.

The Republican and Democratic Parties will hold their primary elections on March 4. If no candidate in a primary election receives a majority of the vote, a runoff election between the top two candidates will take place on May 27.[1]

Contents

Overview[edit]

Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 2,564,228 59.21% 24 25 +1
Democratic 1,471,518 33.98% 12 11 -1
Libertarian 224,903 5.19% 0 0 -
Green 61,520 1.42% 0 0 -
Independent 7,955 0.18% 0 0 -
Totals 4,330,124 100.00% 36 36 0

Districts[edit]

District 1[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 71% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+24.

Democrat Shirley McKellar, who lost to Gohmert in 2012, is running again. Libertarian Clark Patterson is also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert 16,096 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley McKellar 7,240 100%

District 2[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Ted Poe, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+16.

Democrat Niko Letsos and Libertarians Craig Cleveland and James Veasaw are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Poe 34,863 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Niko Letsos 5,906 100%

District 3[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Sam Johnson, who has represented the district since 1991. He was re-elected unopposed in 2012 and the district has a PVI of R+17.

Three Republicans, businesswoman Cami Dean; network engineer Josh Loveless; and pilot Harry Pierce, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012, ran against him in the Republican primary.[5]

Libertarian Cecil Ince and Green Paul Blair are also running but no Democrat has filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson 31,178 80.55%
Republican Harry Pierce 3,004 7.76%
Republican Cami Dean 2,435 6.29%
Republican Josh Loveless 2,086 5.38%
Totals 38,703 100%

District 4[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Ralph Hall, who has represented the district since 1981. He was re-elected in 2012 with 73% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+25.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

At 91 years of age, Hall is the oldest member of the House of Representatives. Fellow Republican John Ratcliffe, a former Mayor of Heath, and former United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, is challenging Hall in the primary election.[6] Also challenging Hall in the Republican primary are John Stacy, former city councillor of Fate City; auto racing part company owner and 2012 candidate Lou Gigliotti; United States Army veteran Tony Arterburn; and engineering manager Brent Lawson.[7]

Results[edit]
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ralph Hall 29,848 45.41%
Republican John Ratcliffe 18,917 28.78%
Republican Lou Gigliotti 10,601 16.13%
Republican John Stacy 2,812 4.27%
Republican Brent Lawson 2,290 3.48%
Republican Tony Arterburn 1,252 1.90%
Totals 65,720 100%
Runoff[edit]
Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ralph
Hall
John
Ratcliffe
Other Undecided
Gravis Marketing May 12, 2014 656 ± 4% 46% 38% 16%
Wenzel Strategies* March 12–13, 2014 436 ± ? 35.3% 47.2% 17.4%
  • * Internal poll for John Ratcliffe campaign
Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe 22,271 52.82%
Republican Ralph Hall 19,899 47.18%
Totals 42,170 100%

Libertarian J.P. Raley is the only other candidate for the seat. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

With Hall's loss, he became the first incumbent Congressman of the 2014 cycle to be defeated in the primary, the oldest Congressman to lose a primary and the only sitting Republican U.S. Representative from Texas to unsuccessfully seek renomination to his or her seat out of 257 attempts since statehood.[9]

District 5[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Jeb Hensarling, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2012 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+17.

Libertarian Ken Ashby is the only other candidate for the seat. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Hensarling 41,634 100%

District 6[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Joe Barton, who has represented the district since 1985. He was re-elected in 2012 with 58% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+11.

Barton faced a primary election challenge from Frank Kuchar.

Democrat David Edwin Cozad and Libertarian Hugh Chauvin are also running.[2][10]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton 32,618 72.66%
Republican Frank Kuchar 12,272 27.33%
Totals 44,890 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Edwin Cozad 11,727 100%

District 7[edit]

The incumbent is Republican John Culberson, who has represented the district since 2001. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

Energy attorney and nominee for the seat in 2012 James Cargas and activist Lissa Squires ran for the Democratic nomination.

Libertarian Gerald Fowler is also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson 31,065 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Cargas 4,098 62.19%
Democratic Lissa Squiers 2,491 37.80%
Totals 6,589 100%

District 8[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Kevin Brady, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected in 2012 with 77% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+29.

Brady was challenged in the primary by Craig McMichael.

Libertarians Russ Jones and Ken Petty are also running. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady 42,368 68.27%
Republican Craig McMichael 19,687 31.72%
Totals 62,055 100%

District 9[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Al Green, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected in 2012 with 78% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+25.

Green George Reiter and Libertarian Johnny Johnson are the only other candidates running. No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green 13,442 100%

District 10[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Michael McCaul, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+29.

Democrat Tawana Walter-Cadien and Libertarian Bill Kelsey are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul 38,406 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 13,915 100%

District 11[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Mike Conaway, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected in 2012 with 79% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+31.

Wade Brown ran against him in the primary.

Libertarian Ryan T. Lange is also running. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway 53,272 73.70%
Republican Wade Brown 19,010 26.29%
Totals 72,282 100%

District 12[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Kay Granger, who has represented the district since 1997. She was re-elected in 2012 with 71% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+19.

Democrat Mark Greene[10] and Libertarians Ed Colliver and Matt Solodow are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger 39,907 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Greene 9,700 100%

District 13[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Mac Thornberry, who has represented the district since 1995. He was re-elected in 2012 with 91% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+32, making it the most Republican district in the entire country.

He was challenged for the Republican nomination by Elaine Hays, a businesswoman from Amarilla; and Pam Barlow, a veterinarian from Bowie, Texas.[11]

Democrat Mike Minter, Green Don Cook and Libertarian Emily Pivoda are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry 45,168 68.20%
Republican Elaine Hays 12,330 18.61%
Republican Pam Barlow 8,723 13.17%
Totals 66,221 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Minter 4,842 100%

District 14[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Randy Weber, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012 to succeed retiring Republican incumbent Ron Paul. He defeated Democrat Nick Lampson, who had previously represented the 22nd district from 2007 to 2009 and the 9th district from 1997 to 2005, with 53% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+12.

Democrats Don Brown, Gagan Panjhazari and Buck Willis ran for their party's nomination.

Libertarian John Wieder is also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber 34,131 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Don Brown 9,780 68.23%
Democratic Buck Willis 3,699 25.80%
Democratic Gagan Panjhazari 853 5.95%
Totals 14,332 100%

District 15[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Rubén Hinojosa, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+5.

Republicans Doug Carlile and Eddie Zamora ran for their party's nomination.[12]

Libertarians Lewis Alexander and Ross Leone are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Eddie Zamora 7,810 54.93%
Republican Doug Carlile 6,407 45.06%
Totals 14,217 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rubén Hinojosa 29,916 100%

District 16[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Beto O'Rourke, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, defeating eight-term incumbent Democrat Silvestre Reyes in the primary with 50% of the vote and winning the general election with 65% of the vote. The district has a PVI of D+12.

Libertarian Jaime Perez is the only other candidate running. No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Corey Roen 6,239 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke 24,728 100%

District 17[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Bill Flores, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected in 2012 with 80% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

Democrat Nick Haynes and Libertarians Shawn Hamilton and Bill Oliver are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores 32,770 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nick Haynes 10,141 100%

District 18[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, who has represented the district since 1995. She was re-elected in 2012 with 75% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+24.

Republican Sean Seibert, Green Remington Alessi and Libertarian Jennifer Whelan are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sean Seibert 6,527 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee 14,373 100%

District 19[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Randy Neugebauer, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2012 with 85% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+26.

He was challenged in the Republican Party primary by physician Donald May and Chris Winn, a former Chairman of the Lubbock County Republican Party and candidate for the seat in 2012

Neal Marchbanks of Lubbock is running for the Democrats.[11] Green Mark Lawson and Libertarian Richard Peterson are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Neugebauer 39,611 64.36%
Republican Donald May 14,498 23.55%
Republican Chris Winn 7,429 12.07%
Totals 61,538 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Neal Marchbanks 6,476 100%

District 20[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Joaquín Castro, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012 with 64% of the vote, succeeding retiring Democratic incumbent Charlie Gonzalez. The district has a PVI of D+6.

Libertarians Jeffrey Blunt and Michael Idrogo are the only other candidates running. No Republican filed to run.[2][12]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquín Castro 16,275 100%

District 21[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Lamar S. Smith, who has represented the district since 1987. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+12.

He faced businessman Matt McCall and Michael J. Smith in the Republican primary.[12]

Libertarians David Cunningham, Mark Loewe and Ryan Shields are also running. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar S. Smith 40,441 60.43%
Republican Matt McCall 22,681 33.89%
Republican Michael J. Smith 3,796 5.67%
Totals 66,918 100%

District 22[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Pete Olson, who has represented the district since 2009. He was re-elected in 2012 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+15.

Democrats Frank Briscoe and Mark Gibson ran for their party's nomination.

Libertarian Rob Lapham is also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson 33,167 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Briscoe 3,378 53.18%
Democratic Mark Gibson 2,973 46.81%
Totals 6,351 100%

District 23[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Pete Gallego, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, defeating Republican incumbent Quico Canseco with 50% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+3.

Soon after the 2012 election, Republicans began recruiting new candidates to challenge Gallego in 2014, including Rolando Pablos, a public utility commissioner and former Chairman of the board for the Museo Alameda.[13] Pablos declined to run but Canseco filed to run again.[14] Two other Republicans, Dr. Robert Lowry and former CIA officer Will Hurd, who was a candidate for the seat in 2010 also ran.[12]

Libertarian Ruben Corvalan is also running.[2]

Republican primary[edit]

Results[edit]
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 10,496 40.96%
Republican Quico Canseco 10,332 40.32%
Republican Robert Lowry 4,796 18.71%
Totals 25,624 100%
Runoff[edit]
Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 8,699 59.46%
Republican Quico Canseco 5,930 40.54%
Totals 14,629 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete P. Gallego 26,484 100%

District 24[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Kenny Marchant, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

He will face Democrat Patrick McGehearty and Libertarian Mike Kolls in the general election.[2][10]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant 34,265 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick McGehearty 8,247 100%

District 25[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Roger Williams, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected in 2012, coming first in the Republican primary with 28% of the vote, winning the runoff with 58% of the vote and winning the general election with 58% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+12.

Democrats Stuart Gourd and Marco Montoya ran for their party's nomination.

Libertarian John Betz is also running.[10]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams 43,030 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marco Montoya 11,691 75.16%
Democratic Stuart Gourd 3,863 24.83%
Totals 15,554 100%

District 26[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Michael C. Burgess, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2012 with 68% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+20.

He is being challenged for the Republican nomination by Joel A. Krause and Divenchy Watrous.[10]

Libertarian Mark Boler is the only other candidate for the seat. No Democrat filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess 33,909 82.62%
Republican Joel A. Krause 6,433 15.67%
Republican Divenchy Watrous 698 1.70%
Totals 41,040 100%

District 27[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Blake Farenthold, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected in 2012 with 57% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

Democrat Wesley Reed and Libertarian Roxanne Simonson are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold 32,727 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Wesley Reed 11,585 100%

District 28[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Henry Cuellar, who has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected in 2012 with 68% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+7.

Green Michael Cary and Libertarian Jaime Perez are the only other candidates running. No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar 36,821 100%

District 29[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Gene Green, who has represented the district since 1993. He was re-elected in 2012 with 90% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+12.

Libertarian James Stanczak is the only other candidate running. No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green 6,244 100%

District 30[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, who has represented the district since 1993. She was re-elected in 2012 with 79% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+27.

State Representative Barbara Mallory Caraway, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012, challenged Johnson in the Democratic primary for a second time.

Libertarian Max Koch III is the only other candidate running. No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson 23,756 69.92%
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 10,216 30.07%
Totals 33,972 100%

District 31[edit]

The incumbent is Republican John Carter, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2012 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+12.

Democrat Louie Minor and Libertarian Scott Ballard are also running.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter 30,011 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Louie Minor 8,036 100%

District 32[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Pete Sessions, who has represented the district since 2003, and previously represented the 5th district from 1997 to 2003. He was re-elected in 2012 with 58% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+10.

Katrina Pierson, a Tea Party activist, challenged Sessions for the Republican nomination.[15]

Democratic attorney Frank Perez and Libertarian Edward Rankin are also running for the seat.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 28,981 63.61%
Republican Katrina Pierson 16,574 36.38%
Totals 45,555 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Perez 10,681 100%

District 33[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Marc Veasey, who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected to the newly created district in 2012, coming first in the Democratic primary with 37% of the vote, winning the runoff with 53% of the vote and winning the general election with 73% of the vote. The district has a PVI of D+18.

Domingo García, who lost the runoff to Veasey in 2012, chose not to run again.[16] Veasey instead faced a primary challenge from attorney Thomas Carl Sanchez.[10]

Libertarian Jason Reeves is the only other candidate running.[17] No Republican filed to run.[2]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey 13,292 73.47%
Democratic Tom Sanchez 4,798 26.52%
Totals 18,090 100%

District 34[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Filemon Vela, Jr., who has represented the district since 2013. He was elected to the newly created district in 2012, coming first in the Democratic primary with 40% of the vote, winning the runoff with 67% of the vote and winning the general election with 62% of the vote. The district has a PVI of D+8.

Republican Larry Smith and Libertarians Doug Purl and Ryan Rowley are also running.[12]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Smith 7,427 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon B Vela 26,237 100%

District 35[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Lloyd Doggett, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 25th district from 2005 to 2013 and the 10th district from 1995 to 2005. He was elected to the newly created district in 2012 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+11.

Republican Susan Narvaiz, Green Kat Swift and Libertarian Cory Bruner are also running.[12]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Narvaiz 9,717 100%
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett 15,399 100%

District 36[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Steve Stockman, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 9th district from 1995 to 1997. He was elected to the newly created district in 2012, coming first in the Republican primary with 22% of the vote, winning the runoff with 55% of the vote and winning the general election with 71% of the vote. The district has a PVI of R+25.

At the deadline to file for the 2014 elections, Stockman chose to challenge John Cornyn for the United States Senate, rather than run for re-election.[1]

Michael Cole, who ran as a Libertarian in 2012, will run as a Democrat.[18]

Green Hal Ridley, Jr. and Libertarians Robb Rourke and Rodney Veach are also running.[12]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]
Declared
Results[edit]
Republican primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin 17,194 33.36%
Republican Ben Streusand 12,024 23.33%
Republican John Manlove 3,556 6.90%
Republican Doug Centilli 3,506 6.80%
Republican Phil Fitzgerald 3,388 6.57%
Republican Robin Riley 2,648 5.13%
Republican Dave Norman 2,325 4.51%
Republican Chuck Meyer 1,574 3.05%
Republican John Amdur 1,470 2.85%
Republican Kim Morrell 1,444 2.80%
Republican Jim Engstrand 1,288 2.49%
Republican Pat Kasprzak 1,116 2.16%
Totals 51,533 100%
Runoff[edit]
Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin 19,301 57.84%
Republican Ben Streusand 14,069 42.16%
Totals 33,370 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Results[edit]
Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael K. Cole 6,507 100%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Stockman challenges Cornyn in Texas US Senate race". Northjersey.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af "Texas Congressional Candidates". Burnt Orange Report. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe 2014 Republican Party Primary Election
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe 2014 Democratic Party Primary Election
  5. ^ "Two GOP challengers for Rep. Sam Johnson | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Ex-US Attorney John Ratcliffe files against Ralph Hall | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. April 16, 2008. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Rep. Ralph Hall draws five primary challengers | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c "Texas - Summary Vote Results". Associated Press. May 28, 2014. Retrieved May 29, 2014. 
  9. ^ Ostermeier, Eric (May 28, 2013). "Hall Makes History: 1st Texas GOP US Rep to Lose Renomination Bid". Smart Politics. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f Tinsley, Anna M. (August 28, 2010). "Filing ends, ballot set for 2014 election | Elections & Politics | News from Fort Worth". Star-telegram.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b Rangel, Enrique. "Thornberry gets challengers in race for Panhandle, West Texas Congressional seat | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal". Lubbock Online. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g "Stockman to challenge Cornyn; Canseco, 2 others file for District 23 - San Antonio Express-News". Mysanantonio.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Local politicians in permanent campaign - San Antonio Express-News". Mysanantonio.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Quico Canseco will try to reclaim seat from Rep. Pete Gallego | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. September 25, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Democrat files to challenge Rep. Pete Sessions | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. October 15, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Domingo Garcia won’t seek rematch against incumbent Marc Veasey for Congress | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  17. ^ Young, Stephen (July 10, 2014). "Meet Jason Reeves, the Guy Guaranteed to Finish at Least Second to Marc Veasey". Unfair Park (Dallas Observer). Retrieved July 14, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Stockman jets for Senate, leaving 36th district open to hopefuls | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013. 
  19. ^ "2014 Primary: John Amdur, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 19, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g "The Most Important Race for NASA & Houston’s Economy". The Houston Chronicle. February 14, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  21. ^ "2014 Primary: Colonel Jim Engstrand, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 1, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Crosby’s Kasprzak running for Congress". The Lake Houston Observer. December 31, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  23. ^ "Manlove for the 36th Congressional District". The Houston Chronicle. January 28, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 
  24. ^ "2014 Primary: Robin Riley, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 4, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014. 

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