United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2008

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The 2008 congressional elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011.

Virginia has eleven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of eight Republicans and three Democrats. It is now five Republicans and six Democrats. Districts 2, 5 and 11 changed from Republican to Democratic, although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 2, 5, 10 and 11 to be at some risk for the incumbent party.

The Primary elections took place on June 10, 2008.

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2008[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,852,788 53.01% 6 +3
Republican 1,590,687 45.51% 5 -3
Independent Greens 14,100 0.40% 0
Libertarian 5,265 0.15% 0
Independents/Write-ins 32,515 0.93% 0
Totals 3,495,355 100.00% 11

Match-up summary[edit]

District Incumbent 2008 Status Democratic Republican Independent Green Libertarian Other Party
1 Rob Wittman Re-election Bill Day Rob Wittman None Nathan Larson None
2 Thelma Drake Re-election Glenn Nye Thelma Drake None None None
3 Robert C. Scott Re-election Robert C. Scott None None None None
4 Randy Forbes Re-election Andrea Miller Randy Forbes None None None
5 Virgil Goode Re-election Tom Perriello Virgil Goode None None None
6 Bob Goodlatte Re-election Sam Rasoul Bob Goodlatte None None Janice Lee Allen
7 Eric Cantor Re-election Anita Hartke Eric Cantor None None None
8 Jim Moran Re-election Jim Moran Mark Ellmore J. Ron Fisher None None
9 Rick Boucher Re-election Rick Boucher None None None None
10 Frank Wolf Re-election Judy Feder Frank Wolf None None Neeraj Nigam
11 Thomas M. Davis Open Gerry Connolly Keith Fimian Joseph Oddo None None

District 1[edit]

VA 1st Congressional District.png
Virginia's 1st congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (inc.) 203,839 56.58%
Democratic Bill Day 150,432 41.75%
Libertarian Nathan Larson 5,265 1.46%
Write-ins 756 0.21%
Totals 360,292 100.00%
Republican hold

The District stretches along the eastern side of the commonwealth. Republican incumbent Rob Wittman won against Democratic nominee Bill Day and Libertarian Nathan Larson. Wittman had only held the seat since January 2008, having won the Virginia's 1st congressional district special election, 2007 to succeed deceased Congresswoman Jo Ann Davis. Larson is an accountant and self-described "anarcho-capitalist."[2]

Analysts: CQ Politics rates seat "safe Republican".[3]

History: In 2006 Democrat Jim Webb lost the district 44%–54% in his U.S. Senatorial election win.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine lost the district by 46.4% to 50.8% in his gubernatorial election win.[5]

District 2[edit]

VA02 109.gif
Virginia's 2nd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Glenn Nye 141,857 52.40%
Republican Thelma Drake (inc.) 128,486 47.46%
Write-ins 368 0.14%
Totals 270,711 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

The District includes Virginia's two largest cities--Norfolk and Virginia Beach, and the Virginia portion of the Eastern Shore. Republican incumbent Thelma Drake lost to Democratic nominee Glenn Nye, a graduate of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., who served as a diplomat in Eastern Europe, Kosovo and Macedonia, Singapore, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Gaza and Iraq.

In 2006, Drake survived a bid from Democrat Phil Kellam by only 51.27% to 48.45%.[6] In 2004, Drake received 55% of the vote in this Virginia Beach-based district, which was won by George W. Bush with 57% to 42% for John Kerry in 2004. But in 2005 Democratic Governor Tim Kaine won the district by 50% to 47%.[5] In 2006, Drake may have been hurt by the downfall of Republican U.S. Senator George Allen, who narrowly lost to Democrat Jim Webb, an ex-Republican and former Navy Secretary under Ronald Reagan. (Allen carried the district 51%–48%.[4])

Analysts: CQ Politics rated the seat "Leans Republican".[3] The Cook Political Report rated it "Republican Toss Up".[7] The Rothenberg Political Report rated it as "Toss-Up/Tilt Republican".[8] The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee considered Drake a "targeted Republican".[9]

District 3[edit]

VA 3rd Congressional District.png
Virginia's 3rd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert C. Scott (inc.) 239,911 97.02%
Write-ins 7,377 2.98%
Totals 247,288 100.00%
Democratic hold

The District runs from Hampton Roads to Richmond. Democratic incumbent Robert C. Scott won unopposed. The Republican Party of Virginia did not listed any prospective opponent.[10]

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Democrat".[3]

History: Scott won re-election with 96% of the vote in 2006. That year Democrat Webb carried 68% of the district in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 71% to 27% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 4[edit]

VA-4th.gif
Virginia's 4th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Forbes (inc.) 199,075 59.51%
Democratic Andrea Miller 135,041 40.37%
Write-ins 405 0.12%
Totals 334,521 100.00%
Republican hold

The District lies in southeastern Virginia. Republican incumbent Randy Forbes won against Democratic nominee Andrea Miller (campaign website).

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Republican".[3]

History: Forbes won with 76% of the vote in 2006. That year Democrat Webb lost the district 45%–54% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine lost the district by 48.3% to 49.6% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 5[edit]

VA 5th Congressional District.png
Virginia's 5th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Perriello 158,810 50.09%
Republican Virgil Goode (inc.) 158,083 49.86%
Write-ins 183 0.06%
Totals 317,076 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

The District lies in southern and central Virginia. Democratic nominee Tom Perriello is the winner against Republican incumbent Virgil Goode.[11] A recount was conducted and Perriello was finally certified [12] as the winner by 727 of 316,893 votes on December 17, 2008.

Analysts: CQ Politics rated the seat "Leans Republican".[13] The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee considered Goode a "targeted Republican",[9] based partly on Perriello's early fundraising.[14] On August 1, the DCCC named Perriello as one of its Red to Blue candidates.[15]

History: Goode won re-election with 59% of the vote in 2006. That year Democrat Webb lost the district 45%–54% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 49.6% to 48.4% in his gubernatorial race.[5] Goode originally won his seat as a Democrat in 1996, voted for President Clinton's impeachment in 1998, became an Independent in 2000, and then joined the Republican Party in 2002. He became the first Republican to represent the district since 1889.

District 6[edit]

VA 6th Congressional District.png
Virginia's 6th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Goodlatte (inc.) 192,350 61.57%
Democratic Sam Rasoul 114,367 36.61%
Independent Janice Lee Allen 5,413 1.73%
Write-ins 262 0.08%
Totals 312,392 100.00%
Republican hold

The District lies in western Virginia. Republican incumbent Bob Goodlatte won against Democratic nominee Sam Rasoul (campaign website) and Independent Janice Lee Allen (campaign website).

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Republican".[3]

History: Goodlatte won with 75% of the vote in 2006. That year Democrat Webb lost the district 40%–58% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine lost the district by 44% to 53% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 7[edit]

VA-7th District-109.gif
Virginia's 7th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Eric Cantor (inc.) 233,531 62.72%
Democratic Anita Hartke 138,123 37.10%
Write-ins 683 0.18%
Totals 372,337 100.00%
Republican hold

The District runs from suburban Richmond to northwestern Virginia. Republican incumbent Eric Cantor won against Democratic nominee Anita Hartke, daughter of former Indiana Senator Vance Hartke.

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Republican".[3]

History: Cantor won by 64%–34% in 2006. That year Democrat Webb lost the district 42%–57% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine lost the district by 46% to 52% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 8[edit]

VA-8th District-109.gif
Virginia's 8th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Moran (inc.) 222,986 67.94%
Republican Mark Ellmore 97,425 29.68%
Independent Greens J. Ron Fisher 6,829 2.08%
Write-ins 957 0.29%
Totals 328,197 100.00%
Democratic hold

The District lies in heavily suburban Northern Virginia. Democratic incumbent Jim Moran won against Republican nominee Mark Ellmore and Independent Green J. Ron Fisher.[16]

In the June 10, 2008, primary elections, Moran defeated Matthew T. Famiglietti, with 87% of the vote.[17] Ellmore won against Amit Singh, by 56% to 44%.[18]

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Democrat".[3]

History: Moran won by 66%–31% in 2006. That year Democrat Webb won the district 69%–30% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 70% to 28% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 9[edit]

VA 9th Congressional District.png
Virginia's 9th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Boucher (inc.) 207,306 97.07%
Write-ins 6,264 2.93%
Totals 213,570 100.00%
Democratic hold

The District covers much of Southwest Virginia. Democratic incumbent Rick Boucher won unopposed for re-election. The Republican Party of Virginia did not list any prospective opponent.[10]

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "safe Democrat".[3]

History: Boucher won by 68%–32% in 2006. That year Democrat Webb lost the district 44%–55% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine lost the district by 43% to 55% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

District 10[edit]

VA-10th District-109.gif
Virginia's 10th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank Wolf (inc.) 223,140 58.80%
Democratic Judy Feder 147,357 38.83%
Independent Neeraj Nigam 8,457 2.23%
Write-ins 526 0.14%
Totals 379,480 100.00%
Republican hold

The District lies in Northern and northwestern Virginia. It covers Loudoun, Prince William and parts of Fairfax and Fauquier counties, as well as Manassas.

Republican incumbent Frank Wolf won against Democratic nominee Judy Feder and Independent Neeraj Nigam[16] in the general election in November 2008. Feder defeated Mike R. Turner in the June 10, 2008, Democratic primary election by 62% to 38%.[17][19] On the same day, Wolf faced Vern McKinley in the Republican primary and won with 91% of the vote.[18]

Independent Neeraj Nigam also ran in 2006 and received 0.77%.[6]

Analysts: CQ Politics rates the seat "Republican favored".[3] The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee considers Wolf a "targeted Republican".[9] On August 1, the DCCC named Feder as one of its Red to Blue candidates.[15]

History: Wolf defeated Feder in 2006, 57% to 41%.[6] That year Democrat Webb won the district 50.0%–48.8% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 50% to 46% in his gubernatorial race.[5] In 2004 George W. Bush won 55% of this district.

District 11[edit]

VA-11th District-109.gif
Virginia's 11th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gerry Connolly 196,598 54.69%
Republican Keith Fimian 154,758 43.05%
Independent Greens Joseph Oddo 7,271 2.02%
Write-ins 864 0.24%
Totals 359,491 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

Democratic nominee Gerry Connolly, Chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, won against Republican nominee Keith Fimian, a former CPA, and Independent Green candidate Joseph Oddo in this open seat race.

Republican incumbent Thomas M. Davis announced his retirement on January 30, 2008. In 1994 Davis toppled one-term Democrat Leslie L. Byrne and rarely faced serious opposition in intervening years. However, his district, located in the wealthy Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, DC, has become increasingly Democratic over the years and will definitely be a top Democratic target. George W. Bush barely won this district with 50% to 49% for John Kerry, which includes part of Fairfax and Prince William counties, in 2004.

Fimian has personal wealth that he can draw upon.[20] So far he has self-financed $325,000 of his campaign funds.

Connolly won the June 10, 2008 primary with 58% of the vote, against Leslie L. Byrne (33%), Doug Denneny (6%), and Lori P. Alexander (3%).[17][21]

Oddo is certified for the ballot. He favors light rail as an alternative to HOT lanes.

Analysts: CQ Politics rates seat "Democrat Favored".[3] The Cook Political Report rates in "Likely Democratic".[7] The Rothenberg Political Report scores it "Lean Democratic".[22]

History: Davis won re-election 56%–44% in 2006. That year Democrat Webb won the district 55%–44% in his Senate race.[4] In 2005 Democrat Tim Kaine won the district by 56% to 42% in his gubernatorial race.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2008/2008Stat.htm#46
  2. ^ http://nathanlarsonforcongress.com/
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Balance of Power Scorecard: House". CQ Politics. Retrieved 2008-07-25.  Note, the percentages are incorrectly rounded.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2008-05-18. [dead link] Official senatorial results by congressional district.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2008-05-18. [dead link] Official gubernatorial results by congressional district.
  6. ^ a b c "General Election- November 6, 2006". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2008-05-18. [dead link] Official results.
  7. ^ a b "2008 Competitive House Race Chart". Cook Political Report. 2008-11-04. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  8. ^ 2008 House Ratings The Rothenberg Political Report, November 2, 2008
  9. ^ a b c "2008 Races Map: South". Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Retrieved 2008-05-18. 
  10. ^ a b "2008 Candidate Rosters". Republican Party of Virginia. Retrieved 2008-05-18. 
  11. ^ CBS News http://election.cbsnews.com/election2008/state.shtml?state=VA |url= missing title (help). 
  12. ^ "Perriello declared winner in 5th District recount". Daily Progress (Charlottesville, Va.). 2008-12-17. 
  13. ^ Race to Watch: U.S. House, Virginia - 5th District CQ Politics
  14. ^ Reed, Ray (2008-04-02). "National Democratic Party added Goode–Periello race to target list". The News & Advance ((via WSLS-TV)). Retrieved 2008-05-18. 
  15. ^ a b Blake, Aaron (2008-08-01). "DCCC adds six to Red to Blue". TheHill.com. Retrieved 2008-08-01. 
  16. ^ a b "Tuesday, November 04, 2008 General Elections: Candidates [House of Representatives]". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  17. ^ a b c 2008 June Democratic Primary Unofficial Results, Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved on 2008-06-11.
  18. ^ a b June Republican Primary Unofficial Results, Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved on 2008-06-11.
  19. ^ Connolly, Wolf, Moran Win Primaries, WRC, 2008-11-06.
  20. ^ Gardner, Amy (2008-04-26). "Contenders Reach to the Left in House Race in Va.". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-05-19. 
  21. ^ Connolly Wins Dem Nomination For Davis' Seat, CBS News, 2008-06-10.
  22. ^ "2008 House Ratings". Rothenberg Political Report. 2008-05-23. Retrieved 2008-05-23. 

External links[edit]