United States Public Health Service Building

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United States Public Health Service Building
Department of the Interior - South Building.jpg
United States Public Health Service Building is located in Washington, D.C.
United States Public Health Service Building
Location 1951 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, District of Columbia
Coordinates 38°53′33.36″N 77°2′39.12″W / 38.8926000°N 77.0442000°W / 38.8926000; -77.0442000Coordinates: 38°53′33.36″N 77°2′39.12″W / 38.8926000°N 77.0442000°W / 38.8926000; -77.0442000
Built 1932
Architect Jules Henri de Sibour
Architectural style Classical Revival
Governing body General Services Administration
NRHP Reference # 07000641 [1]
Added to NRHP July 05, 2007

The United States Public Health Service Building, also known as the Department of the Interior - South Building, is an historic government office building, the headquarters of the Office of Surface Mining. It is located at 1951 Constitution Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C., adjacent to the Eccles Building.

History[edit]

The site was home to a YWCA.

It was designed by Jules Henri de Sibour, for the Public Health Service in 1931. It was renamed to the Combined Chiefs of Staff Building on January 30, 1942. It was the site of the planning for the Manhattan Project. The Atomic Energy Commission occupied the site from its creation in 1947 until its relocation to Germantown, Maryland in 1958.[2] The Bureau of Indian Affairs began using the building in April 1965, and Office of Surface Mining joined them in 1977.[3] The building has since been used by several offices and bureaus of the Department of the Interior which is headquartered next door.

On November 3, 1972 a group of around 500 American Indians with the AIM took over the building, the culmination of their Trail of Broken Treaties walk. They intended to bring attention to American Indian issues, including their demands for renewed negotiation of treaties, enforcement of treaty rights and improvement in living standards. They occupied the Department of the Interior headquarters from November 3 to November 9, 1972.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ http://science.energy.gov/bes/about/bes-organizational-history/germantown-natural-history/germantown-site-history/
  3. ^ http://www.osmre.gov/aboutus/History.shtm
  4. ^ Paul Smith and Robert Warrior, Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee, New York: The New Press, 1996.

External links[edit]