United States Senate election in New York, 1809

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The 1809 United States Senate election in New York was held on February 7, 1809, by the New York State Legislature to elect a U.S. Senator (Class 1) to represent the State of New York in the United States Senate.

Background[edit]

Samuel L. Mitchill had been elected in November 1804, after the seat had been occupied by Theodorus Bailey (1803-1804) and John Armstrong (1804). He took his seat on November 23, 1804, and his term would expire on March 3, 1809.

At the State election in April 1808, a Democratic-Republican majority was elected to the Assembly, and 8 of the 9 State Senators up for renewal were Democratic-Republicans. Due to the split of the public opinion over the embargo against Great Britain, which eventually led to the War of 1812, the Federalists managed to elect a much larger number of assemblymen than during the previous years. The party strength in the Assembly was estimated at 60 to 45, this being the vote for Speaker: 60 for James W. Wilkin and 45 for Stephen Van Rensselaer. The 32nd New York State Legislature met from November 1 to 8, 1808; and from January 17 to March 30, 1809, at Albany, New York.

Candidates[edit]

Assemblyman Obadiah German was the candidate of the Democratic-Republican Party.

The incumbent U.S. Senator Dr. Samuel L. Mitchill ran for re-election.

Ex-Clerk of Dutchess County David Brooks, a former Congressman (1797-1799), was the candidate of the Federalist Party.

Result[edit]

Obadiah German was elected.

1809 United States Senator election result
Office House Democratic-Republican Federalist Democratic-Republican
U.S. Senator State Senate (32 members)
State Assembly (111 members)
Obadiah German 65 David Brooks 43 Samuel L. Mitchill 16

Obs.: It is unclear how the above vote was obtained. There are more votes than members of assembly, but in a joint ballot, there can be only two nominees. It seems to be the addition of the separate votes of the Assembly and the Senate.

Sources[edit]