United States Senate election in New York, 2012

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United States Senate election in New York, 2012
New York
2010 ←
November 6, 2012
Class 1 Senator
→ 2018

Turnout 53.2% (voting eligible)[1]
  Kirsten Gillibrand, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg EWendyLong022612 12.jpg
Nominee Kirsten Gillibrand Wendy E. Long
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 4,808,878 1,755,466
Percentage 72.18% 26.35%

2012 Senate Election NY.svg

County results
    Gillibrand—>90%
  Gillibrand—80-90%
  Gillibrand—70-80%
  Gillibrand—60-70%
  Gillibrand—50-60%
            Long—<50%
          Long—50-60%

U.S. Senator before election

Kirsten Gillibrand
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Kirsten Gillibrand
Democratic

The 2012 United States Senate election in New York took place on November 6, 2012, concurrently with the U.S. presidential election as well as other elections to the United States Senate and House of Representatives as well as various state and local elections. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand won re-election to her first full term. Gillibrand was opposed in the general election by Wendy E. Long (who ran on the Republican and Conservative Party lines) and by three minor party candidates. Gillibrand was re-elected with 72% of the vote, by a margin of 45.2%, the highest margin for any statewide candidate in New York. Gillibrand performed 9 points better than President Barack Obama did in the presidential race in New York. Gillibrand carried 60 out of 62 counties statewide. There was one debate held between Senator Gillibrand and Ms Long in October 2012 where they debated various issues such as the economy, abortion rights, the national deficit, foreign policy and jobs.

Background[edit]

Governor David Paterson appointed then-U.S. Representative Kirsten Gillibrand to serve as U.S. Senator from New York until the 2010 special election, succeeding former U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, who resigned to serve as U.S. Secretary of State in the Obama administration. Gillibrand won the special election in 2010 with 62.95% of the vote over former U.S. Representative Joseph DioGuardi.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Gillibrand has also been endorsed by the Independence Party of New York and the Working Families Party, and will also appear on the ballot lines of both of those parties in the general election.[3][4]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

The 2012 New York State Republican Convention took place on March 16, 2012.[8] Candidates Wendy Long, George Maragos, and Congressman Bob Turner each reached the threshold of 25% of the weighted vote necessary to qualify for the June 26 primary ballot; however, none of the candidates achieved a majority.[9] Long prevailed by a sizeable margin in the June 26 Republican primary, receiving 50.9% of the vote; Turner received 35.6% and Maragos 13.5%.[10]

Long was designated as the nominee for the Conservative Party of New York State, and appeared on its ballot line in the general election as well as the Republican Party line.[4][11]

Withdrew[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Wendy
Long
George
Maragos
Bob
Turner
Other Undecided
Siena College June 3–6, 2012 201 ± 6.9% 11% 3% 16% 70%
Siena College May 6–10, 2012 205 ± 6.8% 12% 6% 15% 67%
Siena College April 1–4, 2012 218 ± 6.6% 10% 5% 19% 66%
Quinnipiac March 28 – April 2, 2012 372 ± 5.1% 11% 7% 19% 2% 61%

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wendy Long 75,924 50.2%
Republican Bob Turner 54,196 35.9%
Republican George Maragos 21,002 13.9%
Totals 151,122 100%

General election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Kirsten Gillibrand (Democratic, Working Families, Independence), incumbent U.S. Senator
  • Wendy Long (Republican, Conservative), attorney
  • Colia Clark (Green), civil rights activist and candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2010[15]
  • Scott Noren (Independent), oral surgeon (had previously been seeking the Democratic nomination)[15][16]
  • Tim Sweet (Independent-Republican), former social worker, journalist, pastor, businessman, author, and actor[17]
  • Chris Edes (Libertarian), Member of the New York Civil Liberties Union Board of Directors[18]
  • John Mangelli (Common Sense Party), Long Island foreclosure defense attorney

Debates[edit]

Oct. 17, 2012 Saratoga Springs, NY

Fundraising[edit]

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Kirsten Gillibrand (D) $13,778,867 $3,734,097 $10,541,156 $0
Wendy Long (R) $336,976 $240,564 $96,411 $250,077
Chris Edes (L) $2,017 $668 $1,348 $0
John Mangelli (I) $43,819 $43,820 $0 $22,120
Source: Federal Election Commission[19][20][21][22]

Top contributors[edit]

[23]

Kirsten Gillibrand Contribution Wendy Long Contribution
Boies, Schiller & Flexner $394,664 Citizens United (organization) $10,000
Davis Polk & Wardwell $314,600 Susan B. Anthony List $10,000
Corning Inc. $150,650 Davis, Polk & Wardwell $8,500
JPMorgan Chase & Co $143,800 Kirkland & Ellis $7,000
Morgan Stanley $140,800 Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz $6,000
National Amusements Inc. $126,850 Alta Partners $5,500
Goldman Sachs $117,400 Actimize $5,000
Blackstone Group $106,700 Carlyle Group $5,000
Sullivan & Cromwell $100,750 Credit Suisse Group $5,000
Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett $95,700 Crow Holdings $5,000

Top industries[edit]

[24]

Kirsten Gillibrand Contribution Wendy Long Contribution
Lawyers/Law Firms $4,050,294 Lawyers/Law Firms $38,550
Financial Institutions $2,748,640 Financial Institutions $31,750
Real Estate $1,257,504 Real Estate $26,250
Retired $921,738 Retired $25,050
Women's Issues $853,517 Misc Finance $16,000
Entertainment Industry $764,677 Women's Issues $15,150
Lobbyists $723,596 Republican/Conservative $11,250
Misc Finance $644,953 Education $7,250
Business Services $621,286 Misc Business $7,000
Insurance $518,275 Construction Services $5,000

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Kirsten
Gillibrand (D)
Wendy
Long (R)
Other Undecided
SurveyUSA October 23–25, 2012 554 ± 4.1% 64% 22% 7% 7%
Siena College October 22–24, 2012 750 ± 3.6% 67% 24% 8%
Marist October 18–21, 2012 565 ± 4.1% 68% 24% 8%
Quinnipiac September 4–9, 2012 1,468 ± 2.5% 64% 27% 9%
Siena College August 14–19, 2012 671 ± 3.8% 65% 22% 13%
Quinnipiac July 17–23, 2012 1,779 ± 2.3% 57% 24% 1% 16%
Siena College July 10–15, 2012 758 ± 3.6% 62% 25% 13%
Siena College June 3–6, 2012 807 ± 3.4% 65% 22% 12%
Quinnipiac May 22–28, 2012 1,504 ± 2.5% 58% 24% 1% 15%
Siena College May 6–10, 2012 766 ± 3.5% 60% 26% 14%
Siena College April 1–4, 2012 808 ± 3.4% 63% 23% 14%
Quinnipiac March 28–April 2, 2012 1,597 ± 2.5% 58% 25% 1% 13%

Results[edit]

According to preliminary results, Gillibrand won re-election by a landslide of over 70% of the vote on November 6, 2012.

United States Senate election in New York, 2012
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Kirsten Gillibrand (Incumbent) 4,808,878 72.18%
Republican Wendy Long 1,755,466 26.35%
Green Colia Clark 36,547 0.6%
Libertarian Chris Edes 28,315 0.5%
Independent John Mangelli 20,223 0.3%
Write-In Write-In 2,001 0.02%
Majority 3,053,412
Turnout

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dr. Michael McDonald (February 9, 2013). "2012 General Election Turnout Rates". George Mason University. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ Hill, Michael (November 3, 2010). "Day after win, NY Sen. Gillibrand is running again". Associated Press. Retrieved December 28, 2010. 
  3. ^ Johnson, Michael (March 12, 2012). "State Independence Party Backs Gillibrand". Capital Tonight. Retrieved May 6, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "New York Democrats back Kirsten Gillibrand for US Senate; Conservatives pick Wendy Long". The Post-Standard. Associated Press. March 19, 2012. Retrieved May 6, 2012. 
  5. ^ Benjamin, Liz (January 29, 2012). "A New Challenger To Gillibrand?". Capital Tonight. Retrieved January 30, 2012. 
  6. ^ U.S. Senate Hopeful Speaks to Rockland Republicans - Pearl River, NY Patch
  7. ^ Campbell, Colin (March 13, 2012). "Bob Turner Announces U.S. Senate Campaign Against Kirsten Gillibrand". Politicker. Retrieved March 13, 2012. 
  8. ^ Seiler, Casey (February 19, 2012). Save the date: GOP plans March 16 convention. Capitol Confidential (Albany Times-Union). Retrieved February 19, 2012.
  9. ^ Benjamin, Liz (March 16, 2012). Three-Way GOP Primary For US Senate. Capital Tonight. Retrieved March 16, 2012.
  10. ^ "Long wins NY Senate GOP primary to face Gillibrand". Wall Street Journal (News Corporation). June 27, 2012. Retrieved 27 June 2012. [dead link]
  11. ^ http://online.wsj.com/article/AP3ee080e11183422da069a5a159256e37.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  12. ^ Vielkind, Jimmy (February 29, 2012). "Joe Carvin of Rye also challenging Gillibrand". Albany Times Union. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 
  13. ^ Benjamin, Elizabeth (March 16, 2012). Carvin Out Of US Senate Race (Updated). Capital Tonight. Retrieved March 16, 2012.
  14. ^ http://www.politico.com/2012-election/map/#/Senate/2012/Primary/NY
  15. ^ a b "Liberal Alternatives To Kirsten Gillibrand". Irregular Times. April 16, 2012. Retrieved May 6, 2012. 
  16. ^ Sultanik, Sara (January 24, 2011). "Ithaca Man to Run for U.S. Senate". WETM-TV. Retrieved January 24, 2011. 
  17. ^ Alumnus vies for New York senate - The Daily Collegian Online
  18. ^ [1]
  19. ^ Gillibrand Campaign Finances
  20. ^ Long Campaign Finances
  21. ^ Mangelli Campaign Finances
  22. ^ Edes Campaign Finances
  23. ^ [http://www.opensecrets.org/races/contrib.php?cycle=2012&id=NYS1 Center for Responsive Politics
  24. ^ Donors by Industry, (opensecrets.org)

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites