United States Senate elections, 1948

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United States Senate elections, 1948
United States
1946 ←
November 2, 1948
→ 1950

33 of the 96 seats in the United States Senate
49 seats were needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  ScottWikeLucas.jpg Kenneth wherry.jpg
Leader Scott Lucas Ken Wherry
Party Democratic Republican
Leader's seat Illinois Nebraska
Last election 45 seats 51 seats
Seats won 54 42
Seat change Increase 9 Decrease 9
Popular vote 12,750,608 9,662,053
Percentage 56.2% 42.6%
Swing Increase 14.8% Decrease 11.9%

Us 1948 senate election map.svg

  Republican holds
  Republican pickups
  Democratic holds
  Democratic pickups

Majority Leader before election

Wallace White
Republican

Elected Majority Leader

Scott Lucas
Democratic

The United States Senate elections of 1948 were elections which coincided with the election of Democratic President Harry Truman for a full term. Truman had campaigned against an "obstructionist" Congress that had blocked many of his initiatives, and in addition the U.S. economy recovered from the postwar recession of 1946-1947 by election day. Thus Truman was rewarded with a Democratic gain of nine seats in the Senate, enough to give them control of the chamber.[1][2]

Change in Senate composition[edit]

Senate composition before the elections[edit]

D8 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18
D28 D27 D26 D25 D24 D23 D22 D21 D20 D19
D29 D30 D31 D32 D33 D34 D35 D36 D37 D38
R49 R50 R51 D45 D44 D43 D42 D41 D40 D39
← Majority
R48 R47 R46 R45 R44 R43 R42 R41 R40 R39
R29 R30 R31 R32 R33 R34 R35 R36 R37 R38
R28 R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21 R20 R19
R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18
R8 R7 R6 R5 R4 R3 R2 R1

Senate composition as a result of the elections[edit]

D8 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18
D28 D27 D26 D25 D24 D23 D22 D21 D20 D19
D29 D30 D31 D32 D33 D34 D35 D36 D37 D38
D48+ D47+ D46+ D45O D44O D43O D42O D41 D40 D39
D49+ ← Majority
D50+ D51+ D52+ D53+ D54+ R42O R41O R40O R39O
R29 R30 R31 R32 R33 R34 R35 R36 R37 R38
R28 R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21 R20 R19
R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18
R8 R7 R6 R5 R4 R3 R2 R1
Key:
D Democratic
R Republican
 
Incumbent re-elected
O Party hold: New senator elected from same party
+ Party gain: New senator elected from different party

Gains and losses[edit]

In addition to gaining an open seat in Oklahoma, the Democrats defeated the following eight Republican incumbents:

Notable freshmen were future President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX) and future Vice President Hubert Humphrey (D-MN).

Complete list of races[edit]

State Incumbent Party Result Candidates
Alabama John Sparkman Democratic Re-elected John Sparkman (Democratic) 84.0%
Paul G. Parsons (Republican) 16.0%
Arkansas John L. McClellan Democratic Re-elected John L. McClellan (Democratic) 93.3%
R. Walter Tucker (Independent) 6.7%
Colorado Edwin C. Johnson Democratic Re-elected Edwin C. Johnson (Democratic) 66.8%
Will F. Nicholson (Republican) 32.4%
Delaware Clayton D. Buck Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
J. Allen Frear, Jr. (Democratic) 50.9%
Clayton D. Buck (Republican) 48.3%
Georgia Richard Russell, Jr. Democratic Re-elected Richard Russell, Jr. Unopposed
Idaho Henry C. Dworshak Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Bert H. Miller (Democratic) 50.0%
Henry C. Dworshak (Republican) 48.5%
Illinois C. Wayland Brooks Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Paul Douglas (Democratic) 55.1%
C. Wayland Brooks (Republican) 44.6%
Iowa George A. Wilson Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Guy M. Gillette (Democratic) 57.8%
George A. Wilson (Republican) 41.6%
Kansas Arthur Capper Republican Retired
Republican hold
Andrew F. Schoeppel (Republican) 54.9%
George McGill (Democratic) 42.7%
Kentucky John S. Cooper Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Virgil Chapman (Democratic) 51.4%
John S. Cooper (Republican) 48.3%
Louisiana Allen J. Ellender Democratic Re-elected Allen J. Ellender Unopposed
Louisiana
Special (class 3)
William C. Feazel Democratic Interim appointee retired
Democratic hold
Russell B. Long (Democratic) 74.9%
Clem S. Clarke (Republican) 25.1%
Maine Wallace H. White, Jr. Republican Retired
Republican hold
Margaret C. Smith (Republican) 71.3%
Adrian H. Scolten (Democratic) 28.7%
Massachusetts Leverett Saltonstall Republican Re-elected Leverett Saltonstall (Republican) 53.0%
John I. Fitzgerald (Democratic) 46.4%
Michigan Homer Ferguson Republican Re-elected Homer Ferguson (Republican) 50.7%
Frank E. Hook (Democratic) 48.5%
Minnesota Joseph H. Ball Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Hubert Humphrey (Democratic) 59.9%
Joseph H. Ball (Republican) 39.7%
Mississippi James O. Eastland Democratic Re-elected James O. Eastland Unopposed
Montana James E. Murray Democratic Re-elected James E. Murray (Democratic) 56.7%
Tom J. Davis (Republican) 42.7%
Nebraska Kenneth S. Wherry Republican Re-elected Kenneth S. Wherry (Republican) 56.7%
Terry Carpenter (Democratic) 43.3%
New Hampshire Styles Bridges Republican Re-elected Styles Bridges (Republican) 58.1%
Alfred E. Fortin (Democratic) 41.2%
New Jersey Albert W. Hawkes Republican Retired
Republican hold
Robert C. Hendrickson (Republican) 50.0%
Archibald S. Alexander (Democratic) 47.3%
New Mexico Carl A. Hatch Democratic Retired
Democratic hold
Clinton P. Anderson (Democratic) 57.2%
Patrick J. Hurley (Republican) 42.4%
North Carolina J. Melville Broughton Democratic Re-elected J. Melville Broughton (Democratic) 70.7%
John A. Wilkinson (Republican) 28.8%
Oklahoma Edward H. Moore Republican Retired
Democratic gain
Robert S. Kerr (Democratic) 62.3%
Ross Rizley (Republican) 37.4%
Oregon Guy Cordon Republican Re-elected Guy Cordon (Republican) 60.0%
Manley J. Wilson (Democratic) 40.0%
Rhode Island Theodore F. Green Democratic Re-elected Theodore F. Green (Democratic) 59.3%
Thomas P. Hazard (Republican) 40.7%
South Carolina Burnet R. Maybank Democratic Re-elected Burnet R. Maybank Unopposed
South Dakota Vera C. Bushfield Republican Interim appointee retired
Republican hold
Karl E. Mundt (Republican) 59.3%
John A. Engel (Democratic) 40.7%
Tennessee A. Thomas Stewart Democratic Lost re-nomination
Democratic hold
Estes Kefauver (Democratic) 65.3%
B. Carroll Reece (Republican) 33.5%
Texas W. Lee O'Daniel Democratic Retired
Democratic hold
Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic) 66.2%
Jack Porter (Republican) 32.9%
Samuel N. Morris (Prohibition) 0.8%
Virginia A. Willis Robertson Democratic Re-elected A. Willis Robertson (Democratic) 65.6%
Robert H. Woods (Republican) 30.8%
West Virginia Chapman Revercomb Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Matthew M. Neely (Democratic) 57.0%
Chapman Revercomb (Republican) 43.0%
Wyoming Edward V. Robertson Republican Lost re-election
Democratic gain
Lester C. Hunt (Democratic) 57.1%
Edward V. Robertson (Republican) 42.9%

References[edit]

  1. ^ William S. White (November 4, 1948). "SWEEP IN CONGRESS - Democrats Obtain 54-42 Margin in Senate by Winning 9 G.O.P. Seats". New York Times. Retrieved April 8, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Truman Sweep". New York Times. November 7, 1948. Retrieved April 8, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Hartley, Robert E. Battleground 1948: Truman, Stevenson, Douglas, and the Most Surprising Election in Illinois History (Southern Illinois University Press; 2013)

See also[edit]