United States Senate special election in South Carolina, 2014

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United States Senate special election in South Carolina, 2014
South Carolina
2010 ←
November 4, 2014
→ 2016

  Tim Scott, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Nominee Tim Scott Joyce Dickerson
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. Senator

Tim Scott
Republican

The 2014 United States Senate special election in South Carolina will take place on November 4, 2014, concurrently with the 6-year South Carolina Senate seat election, as well as other elections to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

The seat was formerly held by Republican Jim DeMint, who resigned on January 1, 2013. Nikki Haley, the Governor of South Carolina, announced the appointment of U.S. Representative Tim Scott to fill the seat, who is running in the special election. Scott will face Democratic councilwoman Joyce Dickerson in the November general election.

Background[edit]

Incumbent Jim DeMint announced on December 6, 2012 that he would resign the Senate seat effective January 1, 2013, to become the president of The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank.[1] Nikki Haley, the Governor of South Carolina, appointed a replacement to fill the seat until the special election.[2] Haley indicated that she would not appoint a "placeholder" to the seat, but would appoint someone who would stand in a 2014 special election to serve the remaining two years of DeMint's term.[3]

Potential replacements[edit]

Congressman Tim Scott was chosen to replace Senator Jim DeMint, following his announced resignation.

According to sources close to Governor Haley, as of December 11, 2012, she had narrowed the list of potential appointees down to five: U.S. Representatives Tim Scott and Trey Gowdy, former South Carolina Attorney General Henry McMaster, former First Lady of South Carolina Jenny Sanford, and Catherine Templeton, who heads the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control.[4] Other politicians mentioned as possible replacements for DeMint included U.S. Representative Mick Mulvaney,[5] South Carolina Representative Nathan Ballentine, former U.S. Representative Gresham Barrett, U.S. Representative Joe Wilson, South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson, former Ambassador to Canada David Wilkins, former South Carolina Republican Party chairman Katon Dawson, and Haley's deputy chief of staff Tedd Pitts.[6] Comedian Stephen Colbert, a South Carolina native, expressed interest in being appointed the seat, asking his fans to tweet Haley that she should appoint him.[7] Chad Walldorf, the owner of the Sticky Fingers restaurant chain, had also been mentioned as a potential placeholder.[8]

A Public Policy Polling poll released on December 10, 2012, which asked respondents who they wanted to replace DeMint, showed Colbert with the highest total. Colbert had support at 20 percent, followed by Scott at 15 percent, Gowdy at 14 percent, and Sanford at 11 percent.[9] Haley said that she would not appoint Colbert to the seat.[10]

On December 17 2012, Haley announced that she would appoint Scott to DeMint's seat following his resignation.[11]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Scott 276,147 89.98%
Republican Randall Young 30,741 10.02%
Totals 306,888 100%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

Declined[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Joyce
Dickerson
Sidney
Moore
Harry
Pavilack
Undecided
Clemson University May 26–June 2, 2014 400 ± 6% 11% 7% 3% 79%

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joyce Dickerson 72,874 65.39%
Democratic Sidney Moore 26,310 23.61%
Democratic Harry Pavilack 11,886 11.06%
Totals 111,437 100%

Independent and Third Parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Tim
Scott (R)
Joyce
Dickerson (D)
Other Undecided
CBS News/New York Times July 5–24, 2014 1,180 ± 5.4% 52% 39% 2% 9%
Rasmussen Reports July 9–10, 2014 750 ± 4% 53% 31% 6% 11%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "South Carolina Republican US Sen. Jim DeMint resigning to take over at Heritage Foundation". The Washington Post. December 6, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2012. 
  2. ^ "All eyes on Nikki Haley to pick Jim DeMint successor". Politico. December 6, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Buzz builds around Jim DeMint successor". Politico. December 10, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  4. ^ "First on CNN: Haley finalizes short list for DeMint seat". December 11, 2012. Retrieved December 11, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Mulvaney in touch with Haley about Senate seat". Politico. December 10, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Reid (December 6, 2012). "Who Will Replace Jim DeMint?". National Journal. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Stephen Colbert to Nikki Haley: Pick Me". December 7, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Business Briefs: Walldorf eyed as DeMint successor". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Associated Press. December 8, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  9. ^ Robillard, Kevin (December 10, 2012). "PP: South Carolina voters want Stephen Colbert". Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Nikki Haley: I won’t appoint Stephen Colbert to Senate". Associated Press. December 8, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Tim Scott to succeed Jim DeMint in Senate". Politico. December 17, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  12. ^ "Tim Scott quiet on Mark Sanford congressional run". Politico.Com. Retrieved 2012-12-24. 
  13. ^ a b c Shain, Andrew (March 27, 2014). "ELECTION 2014 (updated): Who's filed for statewide, State House, Congressional offices". The State. Retrieved March 27, 2014. 
  14. ^ http://votetimscott.com/mike-huckabee-endorses-tim-scott-for-congress/
  15. ^ Governor Sarah Palin’s First Endorsement of 2014: Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina | A Time For Choosing
  16. ^ a b "Official results 2014 Statewide Primary Election June 10, 2014". South Carolina State Election Commission. Retrieved July 22, 2014. 
  17. ^ Renee Standera (October 3, 2013). "County council member to run for U.S. Senate seat". wistv. Retrieved October 30, 2013. 
  18. ^ George Mast (March 17, 2014). "Senator Allen Installed as Chair of National Foundation for Women Legislators". senatenj.com. Retrieved May 21, 2014. 
  19. ^ Zou, Jie Jenny (March 27, 2014). "Former York County Council member to run for Scott’s U.S. Senate seat". The Herald. Retrieved March 27, 2014. 
  20. ^ Jamie Self (September 14, 2013). "Exclusive: Another unknown Democrat seeks US Senate seat in SC". The State. 
  21. ^ Shain, Andrew (December 13, 2013). "Former Obama aide sets sights on Scott’s US Senate seat". The State. Retrieved December 14, 2013. 
  22. ^ Self, Jamie (March 6, 2014). "Democrat Wade exits US Senate race citing fundraising woes". The State. Retrieved March 7, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b c Shain, Andrew (December 9, 2012). "THE BUZZ: A reunion, of sorts, for the Sanfords?". The State. Retrieved August 21, 2013. 
  24. ^ Beam, Adam (August 25, 2013). "The Buzz: Rand Paul on Lindsey Graham, second Democrat may challenge Tim Scott". The State. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  25. ^ Sel, Jamie (November 27, 2013). "ELECTION 2014: Independent collecting signatures to run against Tim Scott". The State. Retrieved February 5, 2014. 
  26. ^ "Tega Cay exec running for U.S. Senate". Fort Mill Times. March 24, 2014. Retrieved March 26, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites