United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2004

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United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2004
Washington, D.C.
2000 ←
November 2, 2004 → 2008

  John F. Kerry.jpg George-W-Bush.jpeg
Nominee John Kerry George W. Bush
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Massachusetts Texas
Running mate John Edwards Dick Cheney
Electoral vote 3 0
Popular vote 202,970 21,256
Percentage 89% 9%

District of Columbia Presidential Election Results by County, 2008.svg

Election results by county

President before election

George W. Bush
Republican

Elected President

George W. Bush
Republican

The District of Columbia voted by an extremely large margin in favor of the Democratic candidate John F. Kerry, with a margin of victory of 79.84% over the incumbent George W. Bush, more than any state and in the history of the district. That can be attributed to the fact that D.C. only encompasses an urban core area (and those are generally very liberal in nature). A recent San Francisco study based on the 2004 presidential election exit polls, ranked the District of Columbia as the 4th most liberal city in the country.[1] This information supports the fact that the District of Columbia has never voted for a Republican.

Primaries[edit]

Election results[edit]

United States presidential election in the District of Columbia, 2004
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic John Kerry John Edwards 202,970 89.2% 3
Republican George W. Bush Dick Cheney 21,256 9.3% 0
Independent Ralph Nader Peter Camejo 1,485 0.7% 0
Green David Cobb Pat LaMarche 737 0.3% 0
Libertarian Michael Badnarik Richard Campagna 502 0.2% 0
Others Others Others 636 0.3% 0
Totals 227,586 100.00% 3
Voter turnout  ???

Results by Ward[edit]

In bold is the best result of each candidate.

County John F. Kerry George W. Bush Ralph Nader David Cobb Michael Badnarik Harris
Ward 1 90.92% 23,727 6.71% 1,751 0.99% 258 0.73% 191 0.33% 85 0.10% 26
Ward 2 82.99% 20,691 14.89% 3,713 0.95% 238 0.36% 104 0.42% 90 0.04% 11
Ward 3 78.79% 28,358 19.32% 6,953 0.84% 304 0.29% 139 0.39% 103 0.04% 16
Ward 4 92.37% 30,341 6.56% 2,156 0.48% 159 0.26% 87 0.09% 30 0.05% 17
Ward 5 93.73% 27,348 5.21% 1,520 0.49% 143 0.31% 90 0.07% 21 0.06% 17
Ward 6 86.87% 25,654 11.31% 3,339 0.74% 220 0.37% 110 0.36% 105 0.06% 17
Ward 7 95.58% 25,914 3.71% 1,006 0.35% 94 0.14% 38 0.03% 9 0.05% 14
Ward 8 96.08% 19,872 3.33% 689 0.29% 59 0.12% 25 0.04% 9 0.05% 11

Electors[edit]

Technically the voters of D.C. cast their ballots for electors: representatives to the Electoral College. D.C. is allocated 3 electors. All candidates who appear on the ballot or qualify to receive write-in votes must submit a list of 3 electors, who pledge to vote for their candidate and his or her running mate. Whoever wins the majority of votes in the state is awarded all 3 electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for President and Vice President. Although electors are pledged to their candidate and running mate, they are not obligated to vote for them. An elector who votes for someone other than his or her candidate is known as a faithless elector.

The electors of each state and the District of Columbia met on December 13, 2004 to cast their votes for President and Vice President. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols.

The following were the members of the Electoral College from D.C. All were pledged to and voted for John Kerry and John Edwards.

  1. Linda W. Cropp
  2. Jack Evans
  3. Arrington L. Dixon

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Voting Research". Voting Research. Retrieved 8 October 2014. 

See also[edit]