Unity Technologies

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Unity Technologies
Industry Computer software, Interactive entertainment
Headquarters San Francisco[1]
Products Game engine
Employees 300+[2]
Website unity3d.com

Unity Technologies is the developer of Unity, one of the most popular licensed 3D game engines. It is used in a variety of 3D and 2D games such as Temple Run and Bad Piggies.

History[edit]

Unity Technologies was founded in 2004 by David Helgason (CEO), Nicholas Francis (CCO), and Joachim Ante (CTO) in Copenhagen, Denmark after their first game, GooBall, failed to gain success. The three recognized the value in engine and tools development and set out to create an engine that any and all could use for an affordable price. Unity Technologies has received funding from the likes of Sequoia Capital, WestSummit Capital, and iGlobe Partners.[3]

Unity's success is partly due to its support for independent developers who are unable to either create their own game engine or purchase licenses to use fully featured ones. The company's focus is to "democratize game development" and make development of 2D and 3D interactive content as accessible as possible to as many people around the world as possible.[3]

In 2008, with the rise of the iPhone, Unity was one of the first engine developers to begin supporting the platform in full. According to a Game Developer’s mobile and social technology survey,[4] Unity is now being used by 53.1% of mobile developers, with hundreds of games released on both Android and iOS devices.

In 2009, Unity began offering a version of their product for free. The number of registered developers began growing quickly following the announcement. In April 2012, Unity realized new heights of popularity as their count of registered developers hit 1 million, 300,000 of which use Unity on a regular monthly basis.[5]

Union[edit]

Union[6] is a division of Unity Technologies dedicated to syndicating Unity games to mobile phones, app stores, tablets, set-top boxes, connected TVs and other emerging platforms. Union works with Unity developers to license games for release on new devices.

Union includes a portfolio of over 125 games that have generated a cumulative 120 million downloads in their collective releases. Examples of Union titles include Shadowgun, Super Crossfire HD, Frisbee Forever, Falling Fred, and Cordy.

Union provides platform partners access to games while empowering Unity developers with new distribution opportunities. Union is free to join and provides an 80 percent revenue share to its developers.

Union platforms include Intel, LGTV, Roku, BlackBerry, Nokia, Sony, and Lenovo.

References[edit]