University Peak (California)

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For other peaks by this name, see University Peak.
University Peak
University peak.jpg
University Peak from the northeast, March 2006.
Elevation 13,595 ft (4,144 m) NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 1,187 ft (362 m)[1]
Parent peak Mount Keith[1]
Listing SPS Mountaineers peak[2]
Location
University Peak is located in California
University Peak
University Peak
Location in California
Location Inyo / Tulare counties, California, U.S.
Range Sierra Nevada
Coordinates 36°44′53″N 118°21′41″W / 36.74799°N 118.3614857°W / 36.74799; -118.3614857Coordinates: 36°44′53″N 118°21′41″W / 36.74799°N 118.3614857°W / 36.74799; -118.3614857[3]
Topo map USGS Mount Williamson
Climbing
First ascent July 12, 1896 by J. N. Le Conte, Helen M. Gompertz, Belle J. Miller, Estelle Miller[4]
Easiest route South Slopes, cross county hike[2][5]

University Peak is a thirteener in the Sierra Nevada. It is named for the University of California.[4] It is on the Sierra crest between Mount Gould to the north, and Mount Bradley to the south.[5] It lies partly in Tulare County and partly in Inyo County. Its west side is in Kings Canyon National Park while the east face is in the John Muir Wilderness.[1]

The nearest trailhead to University Peak is Onion Valley. The least technical route to its summit is an off-trail hike up the south slopes. It offers a variety of other routes from easy scrambles to rock climbing.[5] The more challenging routes led the Sierra Club's Sierra Peaks Section to list University as a Mountaineers's Peak.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "University Peak, California". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  2. ^ a b c "Sierra Peaks Section List". Angeles Chapter, Sierra Club. http://angeles.sierraclub.org/sps/spslist.pdf. Retrieved 2009-08-05.
  3. ^ "University Peak". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  4. ^ a b Farquhar, Francis P. (1926). Place Names of the High Sierra. San Francisco: Sierra Club. Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  5. ^ a b c Secor, R.J. (2009). The High Sierra Peaks, Passes, and Trails (3rd ed.). Seattle: The Mountaineers. pp. 149–152. ISBN 9780898869712.