University of Lorraine

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University of Lorraine
Université de Lorraine
University of Lorraine (logo).png
Latin: Universitas Lotharingia
Established 2012 (2012)
Type Public
Endowment €562 million (2013)[1]
President Pierre Mutzenhardt
Academic staff 3,722
Admin. staff 3,070
Students 52,478 (March 2013)[1]
Undergraduates 22,610
Postgraduates 9,858
Doctoral students 1,736 (2012) [2]
Location Nancy and Metz, Lorraine, France
Campus Urban
Colors              Black, Yellow and White [3]
Affiliations Grands établissements, EPSCP
Website www.univ-lorraine.fr
University of Lorraine (logo) 2.jpg

The University of Lorraine (French: Université de Lorraine), often abbreviated in UL, is a grand établissement created on 1 January 2012 by the merger of Henri Poincaré, Nancy 2 and Paul Verlaine Universities, and the National Polytechnic Institute of Lorraine (INPL). The merger process started in 2009 with the creation of a "pôles de recherche et d'enseignement supérieur" or PRES.

The university is divided into two university centers, one in Nancy (biological sciences, health care, administration, and management) and one in Metz (material sciences, technology, and management). The University of Lorraine has over 52,000 students and offers 101 accredited research centers organized in 9 research areas and 8 doctoral colleges.

Departments[edit]

The University of Lorraine encompasses eight collegia or departments.

  • Arts, Literature, and Languages
  • Human and Social Sciences
  • Law, Economy, and Management
  • Sciences and Technologies
  • Health
  • Technology
  • Engineering Schools
  • Interface

Members[edit]

Faculty of Law, Economics and Management in Nancy

Libraries[edit]

  • The oldest universities in Nancy included several academic libraries, housing 500,000 documents and 250,000 books spread over 36 sites. The first stone of the library of the former Nancy-II was laid by President Albert Lebrun in 1932.
  • Six libraries including three in Metz, Thionville-Yutz, Sarreguemines and Saint-Avold were attached to the University of Metz, housing approximately 280,000 books, 880 periodicals and 26,650 online journals.

History[edit]

The original University of Nancy was founded in 1572 in the nearby city of Pont-à-Mousson by Charles III, duke of Lorraine, and Charles, Cardinal of Lorraine, and transferred to Nancy in 1768. It was closed by the revolutionaries in 1793, and reopened in 1864.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Portrait d'université. En Lorraine, l'an II de la fusion". www.letudiant.fr. 2013-10-24. Retrieved 2014-04-08. 
  2. ^ "Recherche et Innovation (fr)". University of Lorraine. 2013-07-25. Retrieved 2014-04-08. 
  3. ^ "Charte graphique de l'université de Lorraine". University of Lorraine. 

Coordinates: 48°41′46″N 6°10′36″E / 48.69611°N 6.17667°E / 48.69611; 6.17667