University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Journalism and Mass Communication

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School of Journalism
and Mass Communication
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
UNC - Carroll Hall.jpg

Established 1924 Department of Journalism 1950 School of Journalism
Location Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Dean Susan King
Website jomc.unc.edu

Coordinates: 35°54′36.81″N 79°3′6.66″W / 35.9102250°N 79.0518500°W / 35.9102250; -79.0518500

The first UNC journalism class was taught in 1909 in the English department. The Department of Journalism was founded in 1924. It became a school in 1950. In 1990, Mass Communication was added to the name. In 1999, the School moved into Carroll Hall. The School has been nationally accredited since 1958 by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (ACEJMC). The School has 51 full-time faculty. In the School, there are approximately 800 undergraduate students, 100 graduate students (60 Master's and 40 PhD).

The School has nearly 9,000 alumni in all 50 states and 29 countries, including 5,000 alumni in North Carolina. Twenty-four of the School's former students and faculty members have won or been part of 28 Pulitzer Prizes, including the late editorial cartoonist Jeff MacNelly, a three-time Pulitzer winner.

Susan King has been dean of the school since January 1, 2012. King came to the school from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, where she was vice president for external affairs and program director for the journalism initiative.[1] Dulcie Straughan was interim dean of the school in 2011. Jean Folkerts served as dean of the school from 2006 to 2011. Folkerts followed Tom Bowers, who had served as interim dean for one year and had been on the faculty since 1971. Bowers followed Richard Cole, who was dean of the School for 26 years.

The School is home to the North Carolina Journalism, Advertising, Public Relations and Broadcasting Halls of Fame.

History[edit]

English professor Edward Kidder Graham taught the first journalism course at UNC, English 16: “Journalism.” The two-credit course was described as “the history of journalism; the technique of style; the structure of the news story; and the study of modern journals” in the 1909-10 academic catalog.[2]

The Department of Journalism was founded in 1924 with Gerald W. Johnson, an editorial writer for the Greensboro Daily News, as its first chairman. With a six-course curriculum, students could earn a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism degree.[3]

The department offered its first broadcast journalism course, Journalism 67, “Radio News and Features,” in 1943.[4] In 1946, faculty member Stuart Sechriest taught the first photography course, Journalism 80, “News Photography.”[5]

Lola Lee Mustard became the school’s first female faculty member in 1948.[6]

Led by UNC journalism graduate Holt McPherson in 1949, the School of Journalism Foundation of North Carolina was incorporated to raise funds to advance journalism at the school. The money collected provided student aid, chaired professorships and equipment.[7] The foundation continues to fulfill this mission today.

The department became the School of Journalism Sept. 1, 1950, with Skipper Coffin as dean.[8] Coffin was succeeded in 1953 by Norval Neil Luxon, at the time an assistant to the president of Ohio State University.[9]

Luxon created the master’s of arts program in 1955, and the first M.A. degree was awarded in 1957. The doctoral program began in 1964.[10]

The school was first accredited by the American Council on Education in Journalism (ACEJ) in 1958.[11] Since that time, the school has earned reaccreditation every six years.

The school moved into Howell Hall during the fall semester of 1960.[12]

Lester Carson, the school’s first black student and one of the first black undergraduates at the University, graduated in 1963. The same year, Karen Parker, the University’s first black female undergraduate, enrolled in journalism classes.[13]

Luxon relinquished his deanship in 1964, and Wayne Danielson became dean.[14] Danielson left the school in 1969, and John B. “Jack” Adams took over.[15] Adams' tenure included the implementation of the spelling and grammar test developed by faculty members Tom Bowers and Richard Cole. The test still is required of all students to graduate with a journalism degree. On Feb. 1, 1975, NBC News aired a report about the test on a national television newscast.[16]

As of 1977, accreditation was granted on a sequence-by-sequence basis. As a test case in 1978, the school became the first journalism program in the nation to receive unit-wide accreditation.[17]

Richard Cole became dean in 1979 after Adams stepped down. The same year, Harry Amana became the school’s first black faculty member.[18]

Carol Reuss revived public relations courses in 1980 – more than 50 years after Robert Madry taught two educational publicity courses. By 1982, PR was an optional specialization of the news-editorial sequence, and by 1991, public relations became a separate sequence.[19]

With Reed Sarratt as president, the school formed the Journalism Alumni and Friends Association (JAFA) on Jan. 26, 1980. The group continues to keep alumni connected to the school. The N.C. Journalism Hall of Fame was created in 1981 to honor individuals who have made outstanding and career-long contributions to journalism. Honorees have to have been born in or become distinctly identified with North Carolina. Dean Cole and Gene Robert of the Philadelphia Inquirer created the school’s Board of Visitors – now the Board of Advisers – during the 1988-89 academic year. The board is a vehicle to involve a variety of alumni and other media professionals more closely in the school.[20]

The school changed its name to the School of Journalism and Mass Communication to more accurately reflect the diversity and broadness of instruction. At the time, more than 70 percent of the school’s undergraduates were in programs other than news-editorial journalism.[21]

The school created the visual communication sequence in 1991, and the dissolution of the Radio, Television and Motion Pictures program in 1993 brought several new faculty members to the school. The broadcast sequence became electronic communication in 1994.[22]

In 1995, the Park Foundation of Ithaca, N.Y., which later became the Triad Foundation, pledged $5.5 million for the first five years of the Park Fellowship Program, funding graduate educations in the school. The foundation also gave $1 million to construct the Park Library in Carroll Hall. It continues to be the school’s largest benefactor.[23]

The school moved from Howell Hall to its current location in Carroll Hall in 1999.[24]

“Carolina Week,” the school’s student-produced newscast, debuted Feb. 2, 2000, under the supervision of professors Charlie Tuggle and Richard Simpson.[25]

Cole stepped down as dean in 2005, and longtime faculty member Tom Bowers served as interim dean.[26]

Jean Folkerts, former director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University, became the school’s seventh dean in 2006.[27] In 2009, Folkerts led the school through reaccreditation and oversaw the implementation of an ambitious new curriculum to better reflect the changing media environment.

Folkerts stepped down as dean on June 30, 2011, and faculty member Dulcie Straughan was interim dean until January 2012, when Susan King became dean.

Graduate Program[edit]

The Carolina School of Journalism and Mass Communication offers three graduate degrees: a master of arts in mass communication; a master of arts in technology and communication, which is an online degree; and a doctor of philosophy in mass communication. The school also offers an online graduate certificate in technology and communication. About 25 new master’s students and 10 doctoral students are admitted each year. Total enrollment is about 50 master’s and 40 doctoral students.

The school is a national leader in teaching, research and service in journalism and mass communication. It’s recognized for its faculty’s expertise in news writing and editing, along with public relations, advertising, broadcast and visual communication. However, the face of journalism is changing and the school is integrating special programs into its already solid curriculum to keep with the times. Students take advantage of innovative programs in medical journalism, business journalism, health communication, multimedia and a joint M.A./J.D. degree.

Students work closely with faculty in a uniquely collegial environment to cultivate the next generation of academics and professionals. Students excel in research and scholarship, in the media professions and as teachers.

The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications said Carolina "is recognized by academics and media professionals as perhaps the best program in the nation." The ACEJMC report described the program as having "rigorous and highly competitive admissions standards, generous funding that allows students to concentrate on their studies, a solid curriculum, strong administrative support, a faculty committed to nurturing and advising graduate students, and an emphasis on collegiality, cooperation and community."

Roy H. Park Fellowships[edit]

The Roy H. Park Fellowships attract the most talented people from a variety of fields who want to learn new skills, expand their knowledge and embark on media careers. The doctoral fellowships attract top professionals who want to make the transition to careers as university professors and communication researchers. Each year 14 master’s students and 8 doctoral students receive this fellowship.

The fellowships provide graduate students with fully paid tuition, fees, health insurance and stipends. In the 2008-2009 academic year, master’s students will receive a stipend of $14,000 and doctoral students $20,500. An additional $2,000 for research and travel is available.

The program also supports the Roy H. Park Distinguished Lecture Series and Visiting Professorship, bringing in preeminent scholars and professionals to give fellows the nation’s best professional mentors and educational experiences.

Undergraduate Program[edit]

The school has two broad curricula for undergraduate majors: journalism and advertising/public relations. The journalism curriculum offers five sequences:

  • Editing and graphic design
  • Electronic communication
  • Multimedia
  • Photojournalism
  • Reporting

The advertising/public relations curriculum offers three sequences:

  • Advertising
  • Public relations
  • Strategic communication

Special programs[edit]

Journalism Alumni and Friends Association[edit]

The School's alumni association was formed in 1980. The school has more than 10,000 alumni living and working throughout the U.S. and more than 40 countries.[28]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

  • Philip Meyer – author, journalist and professor emeritus
  • Jim Shumaker - editor, teacher and inspiration for the comic strip Shoe
  • Chuck Stone – author, journalist and professor emeritus
  • Sri Kalyanaraman - Associate Professor, Director of the Media Effects Laboratory
  • Rhonda Gibson - Associate Professor, Director of the newly launched Master of Arts in Technology and Communication and former director of the Ph.D. program
  • Paul Jones - Clinical associate professor, director of ibiblio, the first manager of SunSITE.unc.edu (one of the first World Wide Web sites in North America)[29] and Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Information and Library Science.
  • Donald Shaw - Kenan Professor, U.S. Army Colonel (retired), internationally renowned scholar best known for his work on the agenda setting function of the press.[30]
  • Barbara Friedman - Associate Professor, M.A. Program Adviser
  • Ruth Walden - James Howard and Hallie McLean Parker Distinguished Professor, director of the UNC Center for Faculty Excellence[31]

A number of academic journals in the journalism and mass communication discipline are currently edited by the school's faculty:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carnegie Corporation of New York's Susan King named UNC journalism dean"
  2. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 7-8.
  3. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 29-31.
  4. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 50.
  5. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 52.
  6. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 52.
  7. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 82.
  8. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 81.
  9. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 114-5.
  10. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 138-40.
  11. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 142.
  12. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 147.
  13. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 164-5.
  14. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 157.
  15. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 171.
  16. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 184.
  17. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 187-8.
  18. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 182.
  19. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 193-4.
  20. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 203-4.
  21. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 195.
  22. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 195.
  23. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 198-200.
  24. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 219-20.
  25. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 197.
  26. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 229-30.
  27. ^ Bowers, T. "Making News: One Hundred Years of Journalism and Mass Communication at Carolina," 2009. pg. 233.
  28. ^ "Alumni & Friends"
  29. ^ Ingram, P. The World Wide Web (1995) Computers and Geosciences, 21 (6), pp. 799-816.
  30. ^ Agenda-setting was named as a major world research line in a Sage annual review volume, and has been summarized in one study as a research hypothesis that attracted wide public attention, generating hundreds of studies.
  31. ^ http://cfe.unc.edu/about/staff.html

External links[edit]