University of North Georgia

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University of North Georgia
University of North Georgia Logo.png
Established 1873 (1873)
Type Public
Endowment $26,352,480(2011)[1]
President Bonita Jacobs
Students 15,072 (Fall 2012)[2]
Undergraduates 14,510 (Fall 2012)
Postgraduates 562 (Fall 2012)
Location Dahlonega (Lumpkin County),
Watkinsville (Oconee County),
Gainesville-Oakwood (Hall County), and
Cumming (Forsyth County)
, Georgia, United States
Campus Suburban; 794+ acres
Colors UNG Blue and UNG Gold
         
Nickname Nighthawks
Affiliations NCAA Division II, Peach Belt Conference
Website www.ung.edu

The University of North Georgia (UNG) is an educational institution that was established by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents on January 8, 2013,[3] as a result of the consolidation of North Georgia College & State University and Gainesville State College. The consolidation of the two schools was announced on January 10, 2012, and the name of the new school was announced on May 8, 2012.[4][5] The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) approved the consolidation December 11, 2012.[3] The combined institution has campus locations in Dahlonega, Oakwood (Gainesville Campus), Watkinsville (Oconee Campus), and Cumming.

With just over 15,000 enrolled students, the University of North Georgia is the seventh largest public university in the state of Georgia. Within UNG, there are five colleges which collectively offer over one hundred bachelor's and associate degrees, as well as thirteen masters degrees and one doctoral degree. More than 750 students are involved in the university's ROTC program, which has given it the designation as The Military College of Georgia. It is one of only six senior military colleges in the United States. In addition, it is also designated by the University System of Georgia as a state leadership institution.

History[edit]

The University of North Georgia was formed when the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) approved the consolidation of North Georgia College & State University and Gainesville State College in December 2012. Of the two institutions involved in the consolidation, North Georgia College & State University is the oldest, having been chartered in 1873, while Gainesville State College was established in 1964.[6]

North Georgia College and State University[edit]

Built in 1879 at the former site of the Dahlonega Mint, the Price Memorial Hall Building is the oldest surviving building on UNG's campus.
The only known photograph of the United States Branch Mint at Dahlonega after it became North Georgia Agricultural College in 1873. The building burned in 1878.
David W. Lewis was the first president of UNG (1873-1885)

North Georgia College & State University was first established as North Georgia Agricultural College in January 1873. The creation of the institution came about as the result of efforts by U.S. Congressman and Georgia Representative William P. Price. It was Price's idea to use the land script of the Morrill Land-Grant Acts to transform the old Dahlonega Mint into a college.The university's iconic Price Memorial Hall, built in honor of William P. Price, is a nationally registered historic site where the U.S. Mint once stood. The building can be recognized by its gold-covered bell tower, as a perfect reminder of the rich history of gold prospecting and mining in Dahlonega.[7] Along with the Morrill Land-Grant Acts came the stipulation that students in land-grant colleges enroll in military training. This marked the beginning of UNG's identity as "the military college of Georgia." In the college's first year there was an enrollment of 98 men and 78 women, making it the first co-educational college in Georgia.[8]

The ROTC was created as a result of the National Defense Act of 1916. The steady growth of North Georgia College came to a halt in the 1930s as the Great Depression devastated much of the rural South. In 1933 the economic affliction brought about by the Great Depression forced the State of Georgia to reduce North Georgia College to a junior college. Despite this reduction the ROTC program remained intact. North Georgia College remained a junior college throughout the Great Depression and World War II. In 1946 the Georgia Board of Regents decided to reorganize the college into a four-year school, thus giving it the capacity to grant degrees. Three years later Merritt Eldred Hoag became the president of the college. His presidency spanned twenty-one years and oversaw several substantial expansions to the institution. The construction of Lewis Hall, an additional wing to Gaillard Hall, and the four story Hoag Student Center, constructed in 1951, 1961, and 1969 respectively, enabled the college to house more than twice as many students. It was also during the Hoag administration, in 1967, that the college became racially integrated.[8]

The next great period of growth for the college occurred under the presidency of John H. Owen, from 1970 to 1992. His twenty-two year presidency, which was longer than any other President at the school, was defined by substantial increases in student enrollment, spurred by a heightening of academic standards and an increase in the caliber of the faculty. While President he worked with the ROTC Rifle Team and the science department at North Georgia College.[9] In the beginning of Owen's term he worked to develop an alumni association for the school. The alumni association provided a huge financial boost to the North Georgia College Foundation, which provided funds for student scholarships. At the end of Owen's presidency NGC offered roughly three hundred scholarships; there were none at the beginning of his presidency.[8]

Gainesville State College[edit]

Gainesville State College was established as Gainesville Junior College in Gainesville, Georgia in March 1964, but did not start classes until 1966. The college had to continually expand its educational facilities in the late 1960s and early 1970s as more students than originally forecast registered for classes. In 1987, the school changed its name to Gainesville College. As the college continued to grow it opened a satellite campus in Watkinsville, Georgia in 2003. Soon after, it began offerings of more associates' degrees. In October 2005 the Georgia Board of Regents approved a change in the school's mission and name. The school became known as Gainesville State College and simultaneously became a "state college", meaning that the institution could offer a limited selection of bachelor's degrees, such as the Bachelor of Science in Applied Environmental Spatial Analysis. In partnership with NGCSU, Gainesville State College opened an additional satellite campus in Cumming, Georgia in the fall of 2012.[10]

Campuses[edit]

The University of North Georgia has campuses located in Dahlonega, Oakwood, Watkinsville, and Cumming. Collectively, there is 794 acres (321 ha) of land among the Dahlonega, Oakwood, and Watkinsville campuses.[11][12]

Dahlonega campus[edit]

UNG's Dahlonega campus has existed since its establishment as North Georgia Agricultural College in 1873. It was not until 1879 that the oldest surviving structure, Price Memorial Hall, was constructed upon the former site of the Dahlonega Mint.[8] Today the gold-leafed steeple of the Price Memorial Hall building remains one of the most striking features of the UNG skyline. Much of the campus has been developed around the The William J. Livsey Drill Field, more commonly known as simply "the Drill Field".

A panoramic view of UNG's Dahlonega Campus, showing Rogers Hall, Price Memorial Hall, Nix Fine Arts Center, Barnes Hall, Dunlap Hall, the General William J. "Lipp" Livsey ROTC Drill Field, and Lewis Residence Hall.

Gainesville campus[edit]

The addition of the Martha T. Nesbit building in the Fall of 2011 doubled the amount of classroom space at the Gainesville campus.

Until it was consolidated with North Georgia College & State University in 2013, UNG's Gainesville campus was the location of Gainesville State College. Now known as the "Gainesville campus," it is located adjacent to Lanier Technical College's campus within the city limits of Oakwood. It has retained its association with Gainesville, since the school was originally founded and located in that city.[13] Because of its close proximity to Interstate 985 and Georgia State Route 53, it is conveniently accessible for much of Hall County.

Cumming campus[edit]

In 2012, an academic facility in Cumming, GA was opened on GA 400. The goal of the Cumming campus is to eventually offer a range of programs. The intention of the non-residential campus is to address capacity concerns for the University of North Georgia. The Cumming campus also provides higher education to an area of the state that was previously “underserved”.[14]

UNG's Cumming campus was opened in Fall 2012

Oconee campus[edit]

The Oconee Campus was established in 1964, originally as a part of Gainesville State College.[15] Oconee is a non-residential campus primarily serving students in the Athens and Watkinsville area. The campus is easily accessible from US-441 and the University of North Georgia has recently announced plans to expand the campus to accommodate the growing class sizes.[16]

The Administration Building of UNG's Oconee Campus, located in Watkinsville, Georgia, originally served as a satellite campus of GSC.

Academics[edit]

The University of North Georgia is a public co-educational institution that operates on a semester term schedule.[1] Incoming freshmen at UNG have the third highest high school grade point average in the state university system, following the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech.[17]

Degrees[edit]

For undergraduates the University of North Georgia offers 129 different associate and baccalaureate degrees, as well as pre-professional and certificate programs. For graduates the university offers thirteen masters degree programs as well as one doctoral program. As a state-designated leadership institution, UNG is the only university in Georgia to offer a minor in leadership. The school is also a flagship ROTC Center in Chinese. This designation is aimed at helping cadets become proficient in Chinese language and culture.[17] However, due mostly to size, each campus varies significantly in terms of which degree curricula they can accommodate. The Dahlonega campus focuses on Baccalaureate and graduate programs, and is the only one of the four campuses that offers Pre-Professional Programs. A smaller number of baccalaureate programs, most of which are education or business related, are available at the Gainesville Campus, while associate degrees are offered at both the Gainesville and Oconee campuses. As of Fall 2014, Gainesville campus is now offering a Bachelors degree in Communication and offering three concentrations in Film and Digital Media, Multimedia Journalism, and Organizational Leadership.

Baccalaureate Programs Dahlonega Gainesville Cumming Oconee
Accounting
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Applied Environmental Spatial Analysis
Green tickY
Art
Green tickY
Art Emphasis in Art Studio
Green tickY
Art Emphasis in Film
Green tickY
Art Education
Green tickY
Art Marketing
Green tickY
Athletic Training
Green tickY
Biology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Chemistry/Engineering Dual Degree
Green tickY
Chinese Language and Literature
Green tickY
Communication
Green tickY
Computer Information Systems
Green tickY
Computer Science
Green tickY
Criminal Justice
Green tickY
Criminal Justice & Criminal Forensics
Green tickY
Early Childhood Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Early Childhood/Special Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
English
Green tickY
Green tickY
English-Concentration in Literature or Writing
Green tickY
Finance
Green tickY
Green tickY
French Language and Literature
Green tickY
General Studies
Green tickY
History
Green tickY
Human Services Delivery & Administration
Green tickY
International Affairs
Green tickY
Management
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Marketing
Green tickY
Math/Engineering-Dual Degree
Green tickY
Mathematics
Green tickY
Green tickY
Middle Grades Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Green tickY
Music
Green tickY
Music Education
Green tickY
Nursing- ASN & BSN
Green tickY
Physical Education
Green tickY
Physical Education Teacher Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Physics/Engineering-Dual Degree
Green tickY
Physics
Green tickY
Political Science
Green tickY
Psychology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Secondary Education - English
Green tickY
Green tickY
Secondary Education - History
Green tickY
Secondary Education - Mathematics
Green tickY
Green tickY
Secondary Education - Science
Green tickY
Green tickY
Sociology
Green tickY
Spanish Language & Literature
Green tickY
Spanish with Business Emphasis
Green tickY
Technology Management
Green tickY
Technology Management/ Paralegal
Green tickY
Technical Theater
Green tickY
Associate Programs Dahlonega Gainesville Cumming Oconee
Agricultural Engineering
Green tickY
Agricultural- General
Green tickY
Green tickY
Anthropology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Art
Green tickY
Green tickY
Art Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Biological Engineering
Green tickY
Biological Sciences
Green tickY
Biology Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Business Administration
Green tickY
Green tickY
Business Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Chemistry
Green tickY
Chemistry Education
Green tickY
Civil Engineering Technology
Green tickY
Communication
Green tickY
Computer Science
Green tickY
Criminal Justice
Green tickY
Green tickY
Early Childhood Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Engineering
Green tickY
Engineering (RETP)
Green tickY
Engineering Technology
Green tickY
English
Green tickY
Green tickY
English Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Environmental Health
Green tickY
Exercise Science
Green tickY
Foreign Languages
Green tickY
Forestry Resources
Green tickY
Green tickY
General Studies
Green tickY
Green tickY
Geology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Journalism
Green tickY
Green tickY
Health & Physical Education
Green tickY
History
Green tickY
Green tickY
Industrial Engineering Technology
Green tickY
Mathematics
Green tickY
Mathematics Education
Green tickY
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Green tickY
Media Studies
Green tickY
Green tickY
Middle Grades Education
Green tickY
Green tickY
Music (Applied)
Green tickY
Music Education
Green tickY
Philosophy
Green tickY
Physics
Green tickY
Physical Geography
Green tickY
Green tickY
Political Science
Green tickY
Green tickY
Poultry Science
Green tickY
Pre-Dentistry
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pre-Medicine
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pre-Nursing
Green tickY
Pre-Pharmacy
Green tickY
Green tickY
Pre-Physical Therapy
Green tickY
Pre-Physician Assisting
Green tickY
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Green tickY
Green tickY
Psychology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Religion
Green tickY
Sports Management
Green tickY
Social Work
Green tickY
Green tickY
Sociology
Green tickY
Green tickY
Theater
Green tickY
Pre-Professional Dahlonega Gainesville Cumming Oconee
Dentistry
Green tickY
Law
Green tickY
Medicine
Green tickY
Occupational Therapy
Green tickY
Pharmacy
Green tickY
Physical Therapy
Green tickY
Physician's Assistant
Green tickY
Respiratory Therapy
Green tickY
Veterinary Medicine
Green tickY
Certificate Programs Dahlonega Gainesville Cumming Oconee
Environmental Science
Green tickY
Environmental Studies
Green tickY
European Union Studies
Green tickY
Gerontology
Green tickY
Geographical Information Sciences
Green tickY
Paralegal Studies
Green tickY
Spanish Translation
Green tickY
Theatre & Entertainment Technology
Green tickY

Schools and departments[edit]

The University of North Georgia has five Colleges:

College of Arts and Letters[edit]

The College of Arts and Letters comprises twelve departments:

Dean of the College of Arts and Letters: Dr. Christopher Jespersen

College of Education[edit]

The College of Education is made up of four distinct departments:

Dean of the College of Education: Dr. Bob Michael

College of Health Professions[edit]

The College of Health Professions has three departments:

  • Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Head: Dr. Paul Clay Rowell)
  • Nursing (Head: Dr. Kim Hudson-Gallogly)
  • Physical Therapy (Head: Dr. Carol Miller)

College of Sciences and Mathematics[edit]

The College of Sciences & Mathematics has five departments:

  • Biology (Head: Dr. Nancy Dalman)
  • Chemistry/Biochemistry (Head: Dr. Tim Howell)
  • Mathematics (Head: Dr. John Cruthirds)
  • Physics (Head: Dr. Richard Prior)

Mike Cottrell College of Business[edit]

The Mike Cottrell College of Business is housed in the Newton Oakes Center.

The mission of the Mike Cottrell College of Business is to educate students to become ethical business professionals and prepares them to serve as leaders in their communities and in the global marketplace.

The Mike Cottrell College of Business has seven undergraduate programs as well as a part-time Masters of Business Administration program. Those undergraduate programs are as follows:

  • Accounting
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Finance
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Technology Management

Student life[edit]

The University of North Georgia has 14,510 undergraduate students with gender distribution of 45% male and 55% female. Student life at UNG varies between campuses due to the differences in student housing accommodation of the two primary campuses in Dahlonega and Gainesville. Out of the 5,541 undergraduate students attending the Dahlonega campus, 36% live in college-owned housing. Unlike the Gainesville campus, which offers no student housing, the Dahlonega campus has a permanent residing student body of roughly 2,000 throughout most of the fall and spring semesters.[1][18]

Approximately 32% of students at the Gainesville and Oconee campuses are from the counties in which the campus are located (Hall and Oconee counties). The Gainesville and Oconee campuses are located on the outskirts of the city of Gainesville and the city of Watkinsville, respectively. 29% of students at the Gainesville campus are part-time, 'non-traditional' (23 years of age or greater).[19]

Student Organizations[edit]

The University of North Georgia has several clubs and organizations on the Dahlonega, Gainesville, and Oconee campuses that students may join. Overall, there are more than 200 student organizations across the University of North Georgia campuses.[20] Each campus has organizations for various interests, but there is currently no information available about student organizations on the Cumming campus.[21] The University of North Georgia uses the website, OrgSync, to connect students with organizations.

Dahlonega Campus Gainesville Campus Oconee Campus
Academic Academic Academic
Faith-based Faith-based Faith-based
Greek Life Honors Societies Performing
Honor Societies Multicultural Special Interest
Military Performing Arts and Publications Sports
Multicultural Recreational Student Governance
Performance Special Interest Groups
Service Sports Clubs
Special Interest Student Governance
Sports Clubs University
Student Governance Volunteer

Greek life[edit]

As of 2011, 13% of male students and 17% of female students were members of fraternities and sororities.[1] The two councils that govern the Greek community at the school are the Interfraternity Council (males) and the Panhellenic Council (females). The school is home to seven national fraternities, five national sororities, and one local fraternity. Alpha Phi Alpha, a National Pan-Hellenic Council fraternity, has a charter at the university but is currently inactive.

Fraternities Sororities

Greek Life at UNG was established on the foundation of four core values: service, scholarship, leadership, and lifelong friendship. In keeping with these principles, Greek organizations have a set of standards that a student must meet in order to be considered for membership. These criteria are:

  • 2.3 minimum GPA (Some chapters do expect higher as designated by their national and local policies)
  • 12 credit hours completed at the University of North Georgia (Any campus)
  • Full-time student status in a baccalaureate program (Enrolled in 12 credits at the time of membership invitation)
  • Cadet students must be off Quarters (2.5 GPA and 14 credit hours) [22]

Leadership[edit]

The Brook Pennington Military Leadership Center

The University of North Georgia is designated by the University System of Georgia as a 'leadership institution'. The university has received this designation because of how ambitiously it incorporates and promotes the development of leadership skills into many of its academic and extracurricular programs.[citation needed]

The Military Leadership Center was dedicated in 2004 to Brooks Pennington Jr., who was a World War II and Korean War Veteran, as well as a Georgia state Congressman and Senator. The Center accommodates four high-technology classrooms, a conference room, a rifle range, and the Brigade Headquarters.[23]

Because of UNG's status as a leadership institution, it is a participant in the L3 Summit. The Summit is a six day program during which college and university students from all over Georgia engage in team-building exercises and leadership training sessions for roughly eight hours every day. The program is usually held at some point between the spring and summer semesters.[24]

Traditions[edit]

The North Georgia Arch
  • Arch: The North Georgia Arch is located at the campus entrance near Dahlonega's town square. It was built by the Class of 1951 to commemorate their classmates who died in the Korean War. Tradition holds that freshmen are not to walk through the larger archway. Instead they are supposed to walk through the smaller adjacent archway.[25]
Memorial Wall
  • Bugle Calls:
    • Reveille is played every morning at 7:00 a.m., at which time cadets and civilians alike stop and face the flag.
    • Retreat/To the Colors is played every afternoon at 5:00 p.m., at which time all outdoor activity on campus ceases, in order to pay respect to the American flag. Cadets stand at attention and salute the flag while civilians stop, remove their hats, face the flag, and place their right hand over their heart.
    • Taps is played every evening at midnight (2:00 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays of open weekends) to indicate the end of the day. Cadets are required to be in their dorms at this time.
  • Drill Field: The Drill Field is located in the heart of the main campus. This field is the parade ground for the UNG Corps of Cadets, and is used for drill and ceremonies. It is also used for recreational activities,such as intermural sports, though the activities of the Corps take precedence. Although the Drill Field is roughly 800 feet (240 m) long and located in at the center of the campus, students are not supposed to walk across it as a shortcut. Instead, they are asked to walk around the encircling sidewalk when traveling from one building to another. On April 18, 2009, the drill field was dedicated to retired General William J. Livsey.[25]
  • Memorial Wall: The Memorial Wall, located in front of the Memorial Hall Gymnasium, was built in 1983 in honor of UNG students and alumni that died while in military service to their country. Students do not enter the area around the wall unless they are stopping to show honor to those listed on the wall. As of 2013 the Memorial lists 174 names that died during WWI, WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, or were lost in combat.
The UNG Retreat Triangle and the sheathed 75mm pack howitzer cannon
  • Retreat Triangle: The triangle is located near the Drill Field, Student Center South, and Dunlap Hall. It holds the original retreat cannon, a 1902 three-inch (75 mm) pack howitzer, which has been fired daily at 5 p.m. for more than 50 years. The cannon was recently restored by the North Georgia Parents Association. Students do not walk on the triangle or tamper with the cannon under any circumstances.

Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)[edit]

With the exception of its stint as a junior college during the Great Depression (1933-1946), the U.S. Army ROTC program has been active at what is now the University of North Georgia since 1916. However, it wasn't until shortly after the Second World War that the program was able to give its graduates commissions in the army or reserves. This development into an advanced ROTC program was made possible by a combination of the newly passed G.I. Bill, the recent economic recovery in Georgia, and the ambitious leadership of college president Jonathan Clark Rogers.[8] Today it is one of the six senior military colleges in the county.[8] As of 2012 there were 665 male and 91 female cadets (5% of the school's student population) comprising the ROTC program.[10]

By Title X of federal law, UNG is one of only six colleges and universities in the nation designated as senior military colleges.[26] UNG is also designated by the Georgia Board of Regents and the Georgia General Assembly as The Military College of Georgia and as a Leadership Institution. Although the majority of its 15,000 undergraduate students are not members of the Corps of Cadets, the residential campus community in Dahlonega is influenced by military values, including respect, responsibility, and service to others.

During spring and fall semesters, the character of UNG is distinguished by approximately 700 Cadets wearing military uniforms in classrooms and laboratories, while conducting tactical exercises, while rappelling down walls, or parading on the drill field in the center of the scenic Dahlonega campus. At 7 a.m. and 5 p.m., traffic stops and pedestrians turn toward the campus memorial as the bugle marks time-honored ceremonies to raise and lower the flags.

ROTC cadets marching past the "Lipp" Livsey Field Drill Field at UNG's Dahlonega campus.

The Corps of Cadets provides a West Point-like experience during the fall and spring semesters. The Corps of Cadets serves as a leadership, character, and academic development laboratory where Cadets put into practical use the skills and theory that they learn in the classroom. The primary purpose of the Corps is to prepare our Cadets to serve as commissioned Army officers. The secondary purpose is to prepare Cadets who do not or cannot commission, for life and leadership roles in the civilian world. The Corps of Cadets does not seek those who need discipline and structure to succeed in college. Rather, they seek disciplined young men and women who want to be leaders.

Throughout the regular fall and spring academic sessions military life on campus is full-time during the week for cadets. Cadets begin their day with first call 6:45 AM, Monday through Friday. Physical fitness training is conducted at 7:00 AM on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and room and uniform inspections on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Cadets are then free to clean up, eat meals, and attend classes on their own. They participate in leadership laboratories most Monday afternoons. After supper, there is a two-hour mandatory study period for first semester Cadets. Cadets may be released from this requirement upon achieving a satisfactory level of academic achievement. Lights out occurs at midnight. Most weekends are free. However, about one weekend per month is designated as a "closed" weekend for the purposes of training, inspections, competitions, or parades.[27]

Weekends for cadets are not confined by the same consistent and stringent scheduling as are the weekdays. Roughly once a month cadets are subject to a 'closed weekend', during which they must participate in military training or other Corps-related activities. These weekends may include parades, inspections, and field exercises. These exercises take place at Camp Frank D. Merrill, Pine Valley Training Facility, or Radar Ridge, and are intended to compliment the tactical and technical skills that the cadets learn in their military science courses. During 'open weekends', which are weekends not dedicated to military training, cadets are permitted to leave campus to visit family and friends. They may also use these weekends as opportunities to remain on campus and focus on school work. Many cadets also choose to remain on campus during open weekends and enjoy outdoor activities in the local area such as fishing, rafting, and hiking.[27]

The Corps of Cadets positioned in the center of the "Lipp" Livsey Drill Field during the annual Corps of Cadets Review in April 2011

"Boar's Head Brigade"[edit]

The crest of the Boar's Head Brigade

The Boar's Head Brigade is the official designation of the Corps of Cadets at the University of North Georgia. There are currently upwards of 700 students involved in the Corps. The unit comprises battalions, each containing three companies, each of which comprises three platoons, each of which comprises four squads.[28]

"A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, plagiarize, evade the truth, conspire to deceive, nor will he/she tolerate those who do."

—Honors Code of the Corps of Cadets

"Truth and Wisdom"

—Motto of the Corps of Cadets

Military organizations and special units[edit]

There are a number of organizations that are affiliated with the Boar's Head Brigade. Some of them have prehistory dating back to the Civil War.

Aggressor Platoon[edit]

The Aggressor Platoon patch
The Aggressor Platoon serving as the opposing force

"Aggressors Lead the Way!"

—motto of the Aggressor Platoon

The Aggressor Platoon, founded in 1963, is a voluntary extracurricular activity. It was established to serve as the opposing force for Cadet field training exercises. The platoon was open to sophomore Cadets, and known as the "Black Tigers"- a reference to the black fatigues worn by its members. Toward the end of the 1970s the platoon began to allow all Cadets to participate.[29]

Cadets that participate in the Aggressor Platoon are trained in guerrilla warfare tactics, light infantry, Ranger, and special operations. The platoon develops skills that are of use on the modern battlefield. To qualify for membership Cadets must meet physical fitness test standards, a 6-mile ruck march, and a timed obstacle course.[29]

Blue Ridge Rifles[edit]

Main article: Blue Ridge Rifles
The Blue Ridge Rifles patch
The Blue Ridge Rifles at Sweetheart Review '09

"Blue and Gray All the Way!"

—motto of the Blue Ridge Rifles

The origins of the Blue Ridge Rifles predates the existence of any college in Dahlonega. The unit was formed in 1861 when the city dispatched its second group of volunteer soldiers to the Civil War. Once the unit's three years of service was complete in 1864, it reenlisted for the final year of the war. Following the Confederacy's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865 all Confederate military units were disbanded, including the Blue Ridge Rifles. However, the former Blue Ridge Rifle soldiers still continued to maintain social contact with one another as civilians. It was not until 1950 that the Blue Ridge Rifles drill platoon (known as the Honors Platoon between 1950-1958) existed at North Georgia College. Although it shared the same name with the Confederate unit there was no direct affiliation between the two entities. The platoon adopted the name simply in homage to the original Confederate Blue Ridge Rifles.[30]

In 1971 the Blue Ridge Rifles won first place in the East Tennessee State University Drill Meet. Additionally, they were also the 2001 and 2002 National Champion Precision Drill Team.[30]

Cadet Chaplain Corps[edit]

"Faith, Truth, Service!"

—motto of the Cadet Chaplain Corps

The Cadet Chaplain Corps, established in 2000, became an official specialty unit on North Georgia College's campus in 2008. Student cadets participating in this association receive training and mentoring for active and retired Army Chaplain. One of the foremost responsibilities of the Cadet Chaplain Corps is organizing support events such as Bible studies, prayer breakfasts, and corresponding with guest speakers. These speakers include Army officers, athletic coaches, and POW heroes.[31]

Color Guard[edit]

The Color Guard patch
The UNG Color Guard on the drill field

"Duty! Honor! Country!"

—motto of the Color Guard

One of the UNG Color Guard's primary duties is to safeguard and present the colors (American, State, and Boar's Head Brigade) at each and every function of the Corps of Cadets. They are also responsible for performing at special occasions at the request of the university, such as Atlanta Braves baseball games, National Football League games, NASCAR events, Atlanta Athletic Club events, nearby Veteran's Day celebrations, and other various local and community events. It has been nationally recognized for its precision drill performances. The unit earned the title of National Champion Color Guard Team in 2000 and 2002 at the National ROTC Drill Meetings. In 2010 the Color Guard placed second at the Mardi Gras Drill Meet hosted by Tulane University in New Orleans. The Color Guard is open to all students in the Corps of Cadets that meet certain academic and fitness standards[32]

Golden Eagle Band[edit]

Main article: Golden Eagle Band

"Talons of Steel!"

—motto of the Golden Eagle Band

"Raise Hell!"

—alternate motto of the Golden Eagle Band (used primarily by veterans)
Golden Eagle Band at Disney's Music Days Parade 2009

The Golden Eagle Band was formed as a component of the Corps of Cadets in 1873. Since then it has served as the university's sole marching band. Rather than performing at athletic events, as is most common with many university marching bands, the Golden Eagle Band's primary function is to perform at UNG Corps of Cadets functions, as well as represent the Corps of Cadets in parades around the local community and throughout the nation.[33] The mission of the Golden Eagle Band's is to "provide quality musicianship, discipline, and leadership through both military and musical training."[34]

Although the majority of the Golden Eagle Band's performances are military processions, the band has recently adopted Drum Corps International techniques into its own regimen. Every spring the band goes on tour around the Southeastern United States and entertains audiences that come to see the military reviews and processions. Unlike other military units at UNG, the Golden Eagle Band is open to both cadet and civilian students.[35]

Mountain Order of Colombo[edit]

Mountain Order of Colombo
Mountain Order of Colombo at the Colombo Rappelling Tower

"If you can't keep up the pace, drop out of the formation."

—motto of the Mountain Order of Colombo

The mountains near the Dahlonega campus of North Georgia are home to the mountain phase of the U.S. Army Ranger school and serve as a great location for military mountaineering training. In 1962 a group of Cadets, inspired by a demonstration performed by the cadre of the U.S. Army Mountain Ranger Camp, formed the Mountain Order of Colombo. The cadets' request for training was met by Master Sergeant Louis P. Colombo, who was assigned to Camp Merrill at the time.[32]

The Mountain Order of Colombo, sponsored by the Military Science Department, strives to promote enthusiasm for military mountaineering and small unit infantry tactics. The unit aims to train Cadets in fixed installations exercises, hand-to-hand combat, survival tactics, and terrain navigation. The training pertaining to these skills begins in an instructional classroom format before moving to field environments at the college's rappelling tower and later at Yonah Mountain. Under certain circumstances members of the Mountain Order of Colombo may be eligible to attend the U.S. Army Mountain Warfare School.[32]

Athletics[edit]

UNG Nighthawks logo
The Bob Stein Baseball Field was dedicated to alumnus and donor Bob Stein in 2010.
Memorial Hall Gym basketball court

Following the establishment of The University of North Georgia in 2013, the school's athletic teams were nicknamed the "Nighthawks." UNG's athletics teams compete in the Peach Belt Conference as part of the NCAA Division II classification.[36] But prior to joining NCAA Division II, North Georgia (formerly known as NGC&SU) formerly competed in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Southern States Athletic Conference (SSAC) from 1999 to 2005. Margaret Poitevint, Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, is the NCAA designated Faculty Athletics Representative. Men's sports include: baseball, basketball, golf, rifle, soccer, and tennis. Women's athletics include: basketball, cheerleading, cross country, golf, rifle, soccer, softball,[37] and tennis.[38]

The Nighthawks softball team played in the 2013 NCAA Division II Southeast Super Regional. Their other accomplishments include five additional NCAA National Tournament Appearances, eight conference titles, and six-hundred wins in the program's history. The team's head coach, for the past 14 seasons, has been Mike Davenport. The Haines & Carolyn Hill Stadium, or “The Hill,” was constructed during the fall of 2008 on the North Georgia Dahlonega campus. The Hill housed the 2009, 2010 and 2014 NCAA Southeast Regional and Super Regional.

UNG's baseball facility was constructed in 2008 for the former North Georgia College and State University. In 2010, it was dedicated to former NGC alumnus and baseball player Bob Stein, who donated much of the funds used in the construction of the field.[39] The UNG baseball team [40] is a member of the Western Division of the Peach Belt Conference.[41]

The intercollegiate basketball team uses the basketball court located in Memorial Hall Gym, which is part of the Dahlonega Campus.

The UNG rifle team is coached by head coach Tori Kostecki. The rifle team is part of the NCAA Division I Southeast Air Rifle Conference, where they are currently placed second in the conference. The team has also participated in the April 2014 USA Shooting Junior Olympic National Championship. The school's rifle facility is the Col. Raymond C. Hamilton Rifle Range on the North Georgia Dahlonega campus.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "US News College rankings: North Georgia College & State University". US News World Report. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Quick Facts" (url). University System of Georgia website. University of North Georgia. 2012-08-15. Retrieved 2013-02-05. 
  3. ^ a b SACS approves consolidation plans. 'GSC NGCSU Consolidation Site. Last accessed 2013-01-07.
  4. ^ Regents OK college mergers. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Last accessed 2012-01-10.
  5. ^ "Regents Approve New College Names for Mergers". Athens Banner-Herald. May 8, 2012. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  6. ^ "History of UNG". University of North Georgia. Retrieved February 5, 2013. 
  7. ^ http://ung.edu/about/history.php
  8. ^ a b c d e f Roberts, William Pittman (1998). Georgia's Best Kept Secret: A History of North Georgia College. Dahlonega, Ga: Alumni Association of North Georgia College. 
  9. ^ http://ung.edu/libraries/archives/john-h.-owen-collection.php
  10. ^ a b "Quick Facts". University of North Georgia. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  11. ^ "North Georgia College and State University" (url). U.S. News Website. U.S. News. 2011. Retrieved 2013-03-02. 
  12. ^ "Guide to Student Consumer Information Fall 2011 - Spring 2012" (url). Gainesville State College Website. Gainesville State College. 2012. Retrieved 2013-03-02. 
  13. ^ "History of GSC" (url). Gainesville State College website. Gainesville State College. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  14. ^ "North Georgia, Gainesville State to Open Instructional Facility in Cumming". Cottrell MBA
  15. ^ University of North Georgia - Oconee Campus Admissions
  16. ^ "UNG Unveiling". Raimondi, Chris. Vanguard. 10 January 2013.
  17. ^ a b "Campus Information: Quick facts". University of North Georgia College & State University. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  18. ^ "Gainesville State College". College Prowler. Retrieved March 11, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Gainesville State College: Fast Facts (Fall Semester 2011)". Gainesville State College website. Gainesville State College. Retrieved 2013-03-15. 
  20. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions." FAQs. University of North Georgia, n.d. Web. 16 June 2014.
  21. ^ "Student Organizations." Student Organizations. University of North Georgia, n.d. Web. 16 June 2014.
  22. ^ "Foundations of Greek Life." University of North Georgia - Greek Life. University of North Georgia, n.d. Web. 12 June 2014. <http://ung.edu/greek-life/foundations.php>.
  23. ^ "Brook Pennington Jr. Military Leadership Center". The Corps of Cadets. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  24. ^ "The L3 Summit: Leaving a Legacy of Leadership". University of North Georgia. Retrieved 11 April 2013. 
  25. ^ a b "Visiting Campus". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 4/2/2013. 
  26. ^ "10 USC § 2111a - Support for senior military colleges". Legal Information Institute. Cornell University Law School. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  27. ^ a b "Daily Life for Cadet Freshmen". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-29. 
  28. ^ "The Corps of Cadets". North Georgia College & State University website. North Georgia College & State University. Retrieved 2013-03-26. 
  29. ^ a b "Aggressor Platoon". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-28. 
  30. ^ a b "Blue Ridge Rifles". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-27. 
  31. ^ "University of North Georgia website". Cadet Chaplain Corps. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-28. 
  32. ^ a b c "Mountain Order of Colombo". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-28. 
  33. ^ "Golden Eagle Band". University of North Georgia website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-28. 
  34. ^ Golden Eagle Band SOP AY 2009-2010
  35. ^ "Drum Corps International". DCI. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  36. ^ "Peach Belt Conference". PBC. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 
  37. ^ "2014 University of North Georgia Softball Preview"
  38. ^ "Saint's Sports". North Georgia. Retrieved 2013-03-14. 
  39. ^ "University announces first Athletics Hall of Fame Inductees". North Georgia College & State University. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  40. ^ "2014 UNG Baseball Preview"
  41. ^ "2013 North Georgia Baseball Quickfacts". University of Georgia's athletic website. University of North Georgia. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 
  • Roberts, William (1998). Georgia's Best Kept Secrets: A History of North Georgia College. Dahlonega, GA: William Pittman Roberts.