University of North Texas System

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UNT System headquarters

The University of North Texas System is a university system in Texas, headquartered in Downtown Dallas.[1] It is the administrative overseer of four otherwise autonomous Texas institutions of higher learning: (i) the University of North Texas, a comprehensive research institution based in Denton, (ii) the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, (iii) the University of North Texas at Dallas in South Dallas, and (iv) the University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law in downtown Dallas.

The UNT Regents initially created the system in 1980 to optimize management with the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, which, 5 years earlier (September 1, 1975) became part of UNT by way of merger.[2] As a reflection of growth, the UNT System was formalized in 2003 by the 78th Texas Legislature.

University of North Texas[edit]

The University of North Texas, the System's flagship institution, a four-year general education university in Denton, Texas.

University of North Texas Health Science Center[edit]

The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) is a graduate-level institution which includes the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM), the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the School of Public Health, the School of Health Professions, and the UNT System College of Pharmacy.

University of North Texas at Dallas[edit]

The University of North Texas at Dallas (formerly known as the System Center and UNT Dallas Campus) is a university established as a branch campus of the University of North Texas in 2000. In April 2009, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board certified this enrollment and granted UNT Dallas status as an independent general academic institution. Now, the freestanding school is known as the University of North Texas at Dallas, the first public university within Dallas city limits. Freshmen and sophomores are being admitted for the first time in the fall of 2010.

University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law[edit]

The University of North Texas at Dallas College of Law is a new law school operating under the UNT System until 2014 when the college becomes part of University of North Texas at Dallas.

Board of Regents[edit]

The system is governed by the University of North Texas Board of Regents, whose members are appointed by the governor to serve six-year terms. The system added its first student regent — a one-year appointment that does not carry voting rights — in February 2006. The Chairman is also Chancellor of the System.

Chairman Vice Chairman Members Student Member

Current regents, Governor Rick Perry appointees

Jack Arlan Wall (born 1940): appointed November 2007 — expires May 2013
Michael Roe Bradford (born 1946): appointed August 2009 — expires May 2015
Donald "Don" Alden Buchholz (born 1929): appointed November 2007 — expires May 2013
Stephen "Steve" Harris Mitchell (born 1962): appointed August 2009 — expires May 2015
Donald Cullen Potts (born 1938): appointed September 2011 — expires May 2017
George Brinton "Brint" Ryan (born 1964): appointed August 2009 — expires May 2015
Gwyn Clarkston Shea (born 1937): appointed November 2007 — expires May 2013
Alfredo "Al" A. Silva, Jr. (born 1955): reappointed September 2011 — expires May 2017
Michael Ray Williams, D.O. (born 1954): appointed September 2011 — expires May 2017
Alexandria C. Perez: appointed 2012 — expires 2013

Former regents (recent)

Governor Rick Perry appointees
Charles D. Mitchell, MD: March 2006 — May 2011
Charles "Chuck" Beatty (born 1946): 2002 — 2005
Claude Daniel Smith (born 1938) (former chairperson): appointed February 2002; reappointed March 2006 — May 2011
Rice Matthews Tilley, Jr. (born 1936): appointed 2002 — expired May 2009
Governor George W. Bush appointees
John Robert "Bobby" Ray: appointed 1995; reappointed May 2001 — expired November 2007
Roy Gene Evans: appointed 1998; reappointed 1999 — resigned 2002
Richard Knight, Jr.: 1999 — resigned 2002
Tom Lazo, Sr.: 1999 — 2005
Marjorie Craft (née Bowens; born 1945): appointed June 2000 — May 2001 (filling unexpired term of Kirven)
Robert A. Nickell: reappointed 2002 — expired May 2009
Gayle W. Strange (née Gayle Ann Weber; born 1945): reappointed 2002 — expired May 2009
Governor Ann Richards appointees
Topsy Wright (née Topsy Eddie Mae Robertson; 1928–1998): Aug 1993 — May 1998
Jerry Farrington: Aug 1993 — May 1999
Lupe Murchison (née Lucille Hughes Gannon; 1925–2001): Aug 1993 — May 1999
Governor Bill Clements appointees
Joe W. Kirven (born 1932): appointed 1989; reappointed 1995; resigned 2000
Governor Dolph Bricoe appointees
Edwin Bruce Street, Sr. (1912–2005): reappointed 1977
William "Bill" Wallace Jamar, Jr (1924–2003): reappointed 1977
A.M. Willis, Jr. (1916–2011): reappointed 1977
Elton Edward Stuessy (1920–2010): 1973 — 1985, a general contractor, Stuessy headed the Buildings Committee
Kenneth Alton May (born 1929): appointed 1973 to fill unexpired term (UNT BA Journalism, 1949)
Vernon Frank (Doc) Neuhaus (1901–1983): appointed 1973 to fill unexpired term
Governor Preston Smith appointees
William "Bill" Wallace Jamar, Jr (1924–2003): appointed 1971
Hugh Othella Wolfe (1912–2010): reappointed 1971
Davie James Lawson (1927–2007): appointed 1969 (UNT alumnus) (succeeded Joe Nelson)
Gus Sessions Wortham (1891-1976): appointed 1969 (succeeded Ben Wooten)
Berl Edward Godfrey (1906–1992): appointed 1969 (to succeed David A. Kimbell); rejected by the Texas Senate March 1971[3]
Governor John Connally appointees
A.M. Willis, Jr. (1916–2011): 1965 — 1983 (chairman from 1969 to 1979)
Edwin Caton Pannell (1900–1986): 1965 —
Raymond Lee Tollett (1907–1969): 1965 —
Governor Price Daniel appointees
Carroll Fulton Sullivant (1902–1978): appointed in 1961 (1925 graduate of UNT)
Berl Edward Godfrey (1906–1992): reappointed 1961
Governor Allan Shivers appointees
Charles Wayne Duke (1905–1991): 1951 — 1957
Berl Edward Godfrey (1906–1992): 1951 — 1957
Stephen Austin Kerr (1900–1967): 1951 — 1957
Jack Sisco: 1953 — 1959
Frank Joseph Storm, Jr. (1918–1963): 1953 — 1959
Thomas Carlisle Rountree (1893–1962)): 1953 — 1959
Governor Beauford Jester appointees (inaugural board)
Six-year terms
Benjamin Harrison Wooten (1894–1971): 1949 — 1969 (chairman from 1949 to 1969)
James Henry Allison: 1949 — 1957
Grace Cartwright (née Woodruff; 1908–2003): 1949 — 1957
Four-year terms
Charles I. Francis: 1949 — 1953
Robert H. Montgomery: 1949 — 1953
Edward D. Norment: 1949 — 1953
Two-year terms
George Eagle: 1949 — 1951
Stephen Austin Kerr (1900–1967): 1949 — 1951
Charles Robert McCrady: 1949 — 1951

Unclassified appointees

Jonathan Gallegos (former student Regent):
George Whitfield Pepper (born 1941)
Emory Burle Pettit (born 1934)
Martha Fuller Turner (née Mary Martha Fuller; born 1940)
Jonathan Gallegos (former student Regent):
George Whitfield Pepper (born 1941)
Emory Burle Pettit (born 1934)
Martha Fuller Turner (née Mary Martha Fuller; born 1940)

1891 Board of Regents[4]

Hon. Joseph Weldon Bailey (1962–1929), Gainesville
William Alonzo Squires (1839–1924), Henrietta
Maj. Matthew Watson Deavenport (sometimes spelled "Davenport;" 1828–1911), Denton
Col. Thomas Walter Abney (1831–1902), Denton
Judge Finis Ewing Piner (1837–1900), Denton
Hon. Alvin Clark Owsley (1855–1938), Denton
John Allen Hann (1846–1920), Denton
Joseph William Cook (1841–1916), Denton
William A. Ponder (1848–1911), Denton — Ponder's daughter, Helen Ponder (1875–1954), married Alfred H. Belo, Jr., son of the founder of the Dallas Morning News

Chancellors[edit]

  • 1980–1981: Frank Vandiver, PhD, was appointed President and Chancellor July 1980, making him UNT's eleventh president and first chancellor. He resigned August 27, 1981, to accept the presidency of Texas A&M University. The Chancellor's post, at that time, oversaw the University of North Texas and University of North Texas Health Science Center. The position for a Chancellor was created by the UNT Board of Regents in 1980 and the system was formalized in 2003 by the 78th Texas Legislature. Vandiver's thirteen-month tenure in the dual role as president and chancellor is the shortest of either in the one hundred and twenty-three-year history of UNT.
  • 1982–2002: Alfred Hurley, PhD & Brig. Gen. USAF (Ret.), was appointed president and chancellor on February 1, 1982, making him UNT's twelfth president and second chancellor. He stepped down as president of UNT in October 2000 to become the system's first full-time chancellor.[5][6] Hurley stepped down as Chancellor on August 31, 2002. He is currently Emeritus Chancellor. Hurley had previously served 30 years in the U.S. Air Force, where, from 1966 to 1980, he headed the History Department at the Air Force Academy and served as chairman of its Humanities Division.[6]
His tenures as president, eighteen years, and chancellor, twenty years, are the longest of either position in the histories of UNT and the UNT System. In August 2002, the Regents renamed UNT Administration Building — currently fifty-seven years old — in honor of Alfred F. and Johanna H. Hurley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UNT System Offices." (Archive) University of North Texas System. Retrieved on January 3, 2014. "UNT System Building 1901 Main Street Dallas, Texas 75201"
  2. ^ Joyce Hopkins, Board Okays NT, TCOM Final Merger, Denton Record-Chronicle, December 8, 1974
  3. ^ 3 Appointments Rejected by Senate, Dallas Morning News, March 26, 1971, Section A, Page 11
  4. ^ Texas Normal College Exercises, Dallas Morning News, June 19, 1891, pg. 6
  5. ^ Chuck Cook, Hurley Chosen NTSU President, February 2, 1982, Dallas Morning News, pg. 12
  6. ^ a b Regents rename UNT Administration Building in honor of Alfred F. and Johanna H. Hurley, University of North Texas News Service, August 8, 2002

External links[edit]