University of Wisconsin Law School

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
University of Wisconsin
Law School
NumenLumen.svg
Established 1868
Type State university
Dean Margaret Raymond
Students 820
Location Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Campus Urban
Website law.wisc.edu

The University of Wisconsin Law School is the professional school for the study of law at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. The law school was founded in 1868.

Facilities[edit]

The law school is located on Bascom Hill, the center of the UW–Madison campus. In 1996, it completed a major renovation project that joined two previous buildings and created a four-story glass atrium. The renovation was recognized by the American Institute of Architects for its innovative design, incorporating modern design into the 150 years of architecture on historic Bascom Hill. In addition to lecture halls and smaller classrooms, the law school contains a fully functional trial courtroom, appellate courtroom, and an extensive law library. The library is noted for the 1942 mural "The Freeing of the Slaves" by John Steuart Curry that dominates the Quarles & Brady Reading Room (also known as the "Old Reading Room").

Legal philosophy[edit]

The University of Wisconsin Law School subscribes to a "law in action" legal philosophy. This philosophy proposes that to truly understand the law, students must not only know the "law on the books", but also study how the law is actually practiced by professionals. The law school's classroom discussions, involvement with other campus departments, scholarship, and clinical practica all emphasize the interplay between law and society.

Journals and publications[edit]

The University of Wisconsin Law School's flagship journal is the Wisconsin Law Review, which was founded in 1920 and became one of the nation's first entirely student-run law reviews in 1935.[citation needed] Students at the law school also publish two specialty journals: the Wisconsin International Law Journal, established in 1982, and the Wisconsin Journal of Law, Gender & Society, a continuation of the Wisconsin Women's Law Journal, established in 1985. A third specialty journal, the Wisconsin Environmental Law Journal, was founded in 1994 but discontinued publication in 2002.

Clinical programs[edit]

The law school places a great emphasis on its clinical programs, as part of its law-in-action curriculum. The most well-known clinic is the Frank J. Remington Center, named after the late UW law professor Frank J. Remington. The Center runs a variety of programs focused on the practice of criminal law. The largest program in the Center is the Legal Assistance to Institutionalized Persons (LAIP) Project, which provides legal services to inmates incarcerated in Wisconsin. The Center also runs clinics focused on family law, criminal defense, criminal prosecution, criminal appeals, community oriented policing, and an Innocence Project that attempts to reverse judgments against wrongfully convicted defendants. The law school also runs a group of clinics focusing on civil law called the Economic Justice Institute. This clinical trio includes the Neighborhood Law Clinic, which serves underrepresented clients in landlord/tenant, workers' rights, and public benefit disputes; the Family Court Assistance Project; and the Consumer Law Clinic. Finally, the Center for Patient Partnerships is an interdisciplinary patient advocacy clinical housed in the Law School where students of law, medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, public policy etc. serve as advocates for people with life-threatening illnesses as they negotiate the health care system.

Traditions[edit]

1893 Engraving of the University of Wisconsin College of Law building The most visible tradition at the law school is that of the Gargoyle. The Gargoyle graced the roof of the original law school building, built in 1893. That building was torn down in 1963, but the gargoyle was found, intact, amongst the rubble, and was saved as an unofficial mascot. The Gargoyle became the symbol of the law school, and was displayed outside the law school building for many years. With the most recent renovation, it moved to a more protected location inside the law school atrium. The image of the gargoyle graces the cover of the Wisconsin Law Review, and the law school alumni magazine is called the Gargoyle. Its image has been applied to ties, coffee cups, tee shirts and other law school memorabilia. In addition to the Gargoyle, "Blind Bucky" is also sometimes used as an unofficial mascot of the Law School.

Another tradition is the homecoming cane toss, which dates from the 1930s. Before the University's homecoming football game, third-year law students run from the north end of the football field at Camp Randall Stadium to the south end wearing bowler hats and carrying canes. When the students reach the goalpost on the south end of the field, they attempt to throw their canes over the goalpost. Legend has it that if the student successfully throws the cane over the goalpost and catches it, she will win her first case; if she fails to catch it, the opposite will hold true.

Another tradition at the law school is an annual fall competitive challenge between the law and medical schools at the University. This set of competitions is called the Dean's Cup and not only serves as a social outlet for law and med students, but also raises funds to support local charities.

Diploma privilege[edit]

The University of Wisconsin Law School is one of only two law schools in the United States whose graduates enjoy diploma privilege as a method of admission to the bar.[1] Unlike all other jurisdictions in the United States, Wisconsin's state bar allows graduates of accredited law schools within the state to join the bar without taking the state's bar examination if they complete certain requirements in their law school courses and achieve a certain level of performance in those courses. The other school with this privilege is the Marquette University Law School.

Wisconsin residents who graduate from out-of-state law schools must pass the bar exam to be admitted to the bar in Wisconsin. Some states, but not all, will grant reciprocal admission to Wisconsin bar members admitted by diploma privilege after they have completed a certain number of years in the practice of law.

Rankings[edit]

U.S. News & World Report ranked the school 31st among the nearly 200 A.B.A.-approved U.S. law schools in 2014, making it a "Tier 1" law school.[2] Vault listed the Wisconsin Law School as one of its Top 25 programs for 2008 [2] In 2008 the clinical programs at Wisconsin were ranked as having the second most clinical opportunities in the nation by National Jurist, behind Yale Law School.[3]

Employment[edit]

According to Wisconsin Law's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 60.3% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[4] Wisconsin Law's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 21.4%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[5]

Faculty[edit]

Former Faculty[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wisbar.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Search&template=/cm/htmldisplay.cfm&contentid=48646#pro
  2. ^ U.S. News & World Report
  3. ^ [1][not in citation given]
  4. ^ "Employment Summary for 2013 Graduates". 
  5. ^ "University of Wisconsin Profile". 
  6. ^ http://law.wisc.edu/profiles/index.php?iEmployeeID=97
  7. ^ http://law.wisc.edu/profiles/index.php?iEmployeeID=432
  8. ^ http://law.wisc.edu/profiles/index.php?iEmployeeID=107
  9. ^ http://law.wisc.edu/profiles/index.php?iEmployeeID=135
  10. ^ Patricia J. Williams, Notatable Names Database. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  11. ^ "Shirley Abrahamson". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  12. ^ http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000176
  13. ^ "Daniel P. Anderson". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  14. ^ "Gerald K. Anderson". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Norman C. Anderson". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  16. ^ "James N. Azim, Jr". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  17. ^ "Martha Bablitch". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  18. ^ "William A. Bablitch". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  19. ^ "Tammy Baldwin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  20. ^ "Lloyd Barbee". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  21. ^ "Charles V. Bardeen". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  22. ^ "Elmer E. Barlow". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  23. ^ "John Barnes". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  24. ^ "Tom Barrett". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  25. ^ "Robert McKee Bashford". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  26. ^ "Peter D. Bear". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  27. ^ "Bruce F. Beilfuss". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  28. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1919,' Biographical Sketch of Claire B. Bird, pg. 470
  29. ^ "Best Law Professor 2009" Wisconsin Law Journal; "Best Law Professor 2010" "Wisconsin Law Journal".
  30. ^ Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  31. ^ "Ann Walsh Bradley". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  32. ^ "Theodore W. Brazeau". Statewide County WI Archives Biographies. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  33. ^ "Grover L. Broadfoot". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  34. ^ Angie Brooks. The Northeastern Dictionary of Women's Biography. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  35. ^ "Richard S. Brown". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  36. ^ "Edward E. Browne". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  37. ^ "Andrew A. Bruce". North Dakota Supreme Court. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  38. ^ "Michael E. Burke". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  39. ^ "George Bunn". RAMSEY COUNTY LAW LIBRARY BLOG. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  40. ^ "Louis B. Butler". University Of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  41. ^ "William G. Callow". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  42. ^ "Howard W. Cameron". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  43. ^ "Fred J. Carpenter". Statewide County WI Archives Biographies. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  44. ^ "Milton Robert Carr". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  45. ^ "Richard Cates". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  46. ^ "Moses E. Clapp". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  47. ^ "David G. Classon". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  48. ^ "William M. Conley". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  49. ^ "Barbara Crabb". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  50. ^ "Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw". 2013 African American Policy Forum. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  51. ^ "Charles H. Crownhart". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  52. ^ "John Cudahy". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  53. ^ "George R. Currie". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  54. ^ "Joseph E. Davies". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  55. ^ "Glenn Robert Davis". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  56. ^ "Roland B. Day". Journal Sentinel Inc. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  57. ^ "John A. Decker". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  58. ^ "Judge David G. Deininger". Government Accountability Board. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 
  59. ^ "Christian Doerfler". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  60. ^ "W. Patrick Donlin". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  61. ^ "Davis A. Donnelly". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  62. ^ "F. Ryan Duffy". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  63. ^ "Charles P. Dykman". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  64. ^ "William Eich". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  65. ^ "Evan Alfred Evans". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  66. ^ "Thomas E. Fairchild". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  67. ^ "Robben Wright Fleming". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  68. ^ http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=F000388
  69. ^ "Ed Garvey". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  70. ^ "Edward J. Gehl". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  71. ^ "Mark Andrew Green". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  72. ^ "Kenneth P. Grubb". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  73. ^ "David W. Hagen". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  74. ^ "Connor Hansen". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  75. ^ "Everis A. Hayes". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  76. ^ "Nathan Heffernan". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  77. ^ "Paul B. Higginbotham". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  78. ^ "Knute Hill". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  79. ^ "Michael W. Hoover". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  80. ^ Wisconsin Blue Book. 1903. p. 1,080. 
  81. ^ "Paul O. Husting". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  82. ^ "Lester Johnson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  83. ^ "Burr W. Jones". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  84. ^ "William Carey Jones". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  85. ^ "John C. Karel". The Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  86. ^ "Robert Kastenmeier". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  87. ^ "David Keene". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  88. ^ "Ernest Keppler". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  89. ^ http://www.nndb.com/people/580/000122214/
  90. ^ "Arthur W. Kopp". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  91. ^ "Andrew L. Kreutzer". The Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  92. ^ "James E. Krier". University of Michigan. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  93. ^ "Belle Case La Follette". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  94. ^ "Philip La Follette". National Governors Association. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  95. ^ Robert M. La Follette, La Follette's Autobiography; a Personal Narrative of Political Experiences, 1913.
  96. ^ "Elmer O. Leatherwood". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  97. ^ "Stacy Leeds". Cherokee Nation. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  98. ^ "Judith L. Lichtman". National Partnership for Women & Families. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  99. ^ "Paul Lundsten". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  100. ^ "Claude Luse". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  101. ^ "James Manahan". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  102. ^ "David W. Márquez". Alaska Permanent Fund Board Confirmation Committee. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  103. ^ "Robert Bruce McCoy". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  104. ^ "Dale McKenna". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  105. ^ Wisconsin Alumni Association (1905). Wisconsin Alumni Magazine, Volume 7. Wisconsin Alumni Association. p. 125. 
  106. ^ "Elmer A. Morse". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  107. ^ "Louis Wescott Myers". An Ancestry -Comm community. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  108. ^ "Gaylord Nelson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  109. ^ "John M. Nelson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  110. ^ "Mark Nordenberg". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  111. ^ "Kenneth J. O'Connell". Oregon School of Law. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  112. ^ "John Oestreicher". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  113. ^ "Walter C. Owen". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  114. ^ "Gregory A. Peterson". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  115. ^ "Richard F. Pettigrew". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  116. ^ "Vel Phillips". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  117. ^ "David Prosser, Jr.". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  118. ^ "Rudolph T. Randa". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  119. ^ "Clifford E. Randall". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  120. ^ "Henry R. Rathbone". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  121. ^ "James Ward Rector". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  122. ^ "Lowell A. Reed". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  123. ^ Alfred Regnery, Publisher, The American Spectator; Author, The Ascendance of American Conservatism, Commonwealth Club of California, June 2, 2008
  124. ^ "Michael Reilly". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  125. ^ "Paul F. Reilly". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 8 February 2013. 
  126. ^ http://www.nndb.com/people/581/000122215/
  127. ^ "Alan S. Robertson". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  128. ^ "Patience D. Roggensack". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  129. ^ "John Rowe". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  130. ^ "Arthur L. Sanborn". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  131. ^ "Harry Sauthoff". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  132. ^ "Charles B. Schudson". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  133. ^ "James Sensenbrenner". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  134. ^ "Robert G. Siebecker". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  135. ^ "David Sturtevant Ruder". Northwestern University School of Law. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  136. ^ "Albert Morris Sames". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  137. ^ "Burton A. Scott". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  138. ^ "Donald W. Steinmetz". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  139. ^ "E. Ray Stevens". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  140. ^ "Michael T. Sullivan". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  141. ^ "Robert D. Sundby". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  142. ^ "James A. Tawney". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  143. ^ "Donald Edgar Tewes". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  144. ^ "William Te Winkle". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  145. ^ "Lewis D. Thill". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  146. ^ "Carl W. Thompson". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  147. ^ "Tommy Thompson". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  148. ^ "Vernon W. Thomson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 10 February 2013. 
  149. ^ "Tuczynski, Phillip James 1947". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  150. ^ "Margaret J. Vergeront". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  151. ^ "Aad J. Vinje". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  152. ^ "Edward Voigt". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  153. ^ "Michael J. Wallrich". Statewide County WI Archives Biographies. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  154. ^ http://www.nndb.com/people/655/000177124/
  155. ^ "John D. Wickhem". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  156. ^ "Jon P. Wilcox". Wisconsin Court System. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  157. ^ http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=W000465
  158. ^ "John B. Winslow". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  159. ^ Martin, Douglas. "Elmer Winter, 97, Co-Founder of Manpower Temp Agency, Dies ", The New York Times, October 30, 2009. Accessed November 2, 2009.
  160. ^ Wisconsin Blue Book. 1903. p. 1,077. 
  161. ^ "Richard J. Zaborski". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  162. ^ "Nicholas S. Zeppos". Vanderbilt University ·. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°04′29″N 89°24′09″W / 43.074644°N 89.402435°W / 43.074644; -89.402435