Unryū Kyūkichi

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Unryū Kyūkichi
雲龍 久吉
Kunisada II Unryu 1864.jpg
Personal information
Born Kyūkichi Shiozuka
1822
Yanagawa, Fukuoka, Japan
Died June 15, 1890(1890-06-15) (aged 68)
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 135 kg (298 lb)
Career
Stable Oitekaze
Record 127-32-55
15draws-5holds(Makuuchi)
Debut November, 1847
Highest rank Yokozuna (September 1861)
Retired February, 1865
Championships 7 (Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Unryū Kyūkichi (雲龍 久吉, 1822 – June 15, 1890; aka Unryū Hisakichi) was a sumo wrestler from Yanagawa, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 10th yokozuna.

Career[edit]

He was born in Yanagawa, Fukuoka. He lost his parents and grandmother in 1833.[1] He made his debut in Osaka sumo in May 1846. He moved to Edo in 1847. He was promoted to the top makuuchi division in February 1852.

Unryū was a strong wrestler at the beginning of his career. He won four consecutive championships upon entering the top makuuchi division. On the occasion of Matthew C. Perry's visit to Japan, he had an opportunity to display his wrestling prowess in a tournament Perry and his military advisors attended.[1] He was promoted to ōzeki in January 1858.

He was awarded a yokozuna licence in September 1861, but by that time he had already passed his peak and was unable to win a significant number of bouts after that. In the top makuuchi division, he won 127 bouts and lost 32 bouts, recording a winning percentage of 79.9.

Retirement from sumo[edit]

Unryū Kyūkichi as an elder

After his retirement in February 1865, he remained in the sumo world as an elder. He was the chairman (fudegashira) of Tokyo sumo in the early Meiji period, and he acquired a reputation for honesty.[2]

The name of one style of yokozuna dohyō-iri (the yokozuna ring entering ceremony) came from him. His ritual dance was said to be beautiful but it isn't proven that he performed the ritual dance in the Unryū style. His style is said to have been imitated by Tachiyama Mineemon,[3] but Tachiyama's style is called shiranui style now. This was due to sumo scholar Kozo Hikoyama, who without researching properly, labelled Tachiyama's style as being that of Shiranui Koemon, whereas it was in fact created by Unryū. Hikoyama was such an authority that noone contradicted him, and the Shiranui name has obtained.[4]

Top division record[edit]

  • The actual time the tournaments were held during the year in this period often varied.
Unryu[5][6]
- Spring Winter
1852 East Maegashira #7
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
East Maegashira #3
7–1–1
1draw
Unofficial

 
1853 East Maegashira #2
6–0–2
1d 1h
Unofficial

 
East Maegashira #1
8–0–2
Unofficial

 
1854 East Komusubi
3–3–1
3d

 
East Komusubi
5–1–1
2d 1h

 
1855 Called off due to fire Not held
1856 East Komusubi
4–1–4
1h

 
East Sekiwake
9–0–1
Unofficial

 
1857 East Sekiwake
7–1
 
East Sekiwake
7–1–1
1h
Unofficial

 
1858 East Ōzeki
5–2–3
 
Called off due to fire
1859 East Ōzeki
5–2–3
 
East Ōzeki
3–1–4
1d 1h

 
1860 East Ōzeki
5–2–1
2d

 
East Ōzeki
5–1–1
 
1861 East Ōzeki
3–1–6
 
East Ōzeki
7–2–1
 
1862 East Ōzeki
6–2–2
 
East Ōzeki
6–1–2
1d
Unofficial

 
1863 East Ōzeki
4–3–3
 
East Ōzeki
5–1–1
2d

 
1864 East Ōzeki
5–3–1
1d

 
East Ōzeki
4–3–3
 
1865 East Ōzeki
Retired
0–0–10
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り);   nr=no result recorded
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: 
Yokozuna (not ranked as such on banzuke until 1890)
ŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded before the 1909 summer tournament and the above unofficial championships are historically conferred. For more information see yūshō.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 雲龍久吉…土俵入りに名残す横綱(福岡県柳川市) (in Japanese). Yomiuri Shimbun. Retrieved 2008-07-04. 
  2. ^ 雲龍 久吉 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2008-07-04. 
  3. ^ "The 11th Yokozuna Shiranui Koemon". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 2007-10-10. 
  4. ^ Castella, Stehane;Perran, Thierry (February 2006). "History and evolution of the tsuna since 1789". Le Monde Du Sumo. Retrieved 2008-06-17. 
  5. ^ "Unryu Hisakichi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-10-05. 
  6. ^ 大相撲優勝力士 (in Japanese). ja.wikipedia. Retrieved 2007-10-05. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Hidenoyama Raigorō
10th Yokozuna
1861 - 1865
Next:
Shiranui Kōemon
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title