Untangle

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Untangle, Inc.
Type Private
Industry Security software, security appliances, Internet security, network security
Founded 2003
Headquarters Sunnyvale, CA
Key people CEO: Bob Walters
Founder: John Irwin
Founder: Dirk Morris
Products Web content filtering, anti-spam, antivirus, anti-phishing, anti-spyware, intrusion prevention, Application Control, firewall, OpenVPN, bandwidth management, web cache
Website untangle.com

Untangle is a privately held company based in Sunnyvale, California, which produces and supports the software and hardware versions of the Untangle firewall UTM networking application. Untangle is used by nearly 40,000 organizations worldwide.[1]

History[edit]

Untangle was founded in 2003 as Metavize, Inc. by John Irwin and Dirk Morris.[2] In 2006, Metavize raised a $10.5M series-A venture funding round from CMEA Ventures and Rustic Canyon Partners, named Bob Walters as CEO, and renamed to Untangle, Inc.[3] In 2007, Untangle released the Untangle Gateway Platform as open source under the GPLv2 license.[4]

In October 2009, Untangle released Untangle 7.0 which included improvements to its reporting capabilities.[5] In December 2009, Untangle released Untangle 7.1 which included improvements to its web filtering and policy management applications.[6] In March 2010, Untangle released Untangle 7.2 which included its Captive Portal application.[7]

Untangle released a free bookmark utility called SaveFace in May 2010, in response to continued loosening of default privacy settings in Facebook user accounts.[8][9] In June 2010 Untangle released Untangle 7.3, enabling the company's software to be used by OEM hardware manufacturers to produce their own branded multi-function firewalls and UTM appliances.[10] In August 2010 Untangle released Untangle 7.4, wherein it simplified its packages to Lite, Standard, and Premium.[11]

In November 2010 Untangle released Untangle 8.0, which included Bandwidth Control.[12] In February 2011 Untangle released Untangle 8.1, which included Web Cache.[13] Untangle 9.0 was released later in 2011, and included IPsec VPN support.

In February 2012 Untangle released Untangle 9.2, which included Application Control.[14] Application Control allows users to block, flag, or tarpit applications and protocols. For a greater degree of control, administrators can create custom rules in the proprietary Integrated Rules Engine (IRE), which target more complex traffic patterns.

The IRE allows Application Control to work in concert with other aspects of the multi-function firewall suite to enable rule-based blocking of the most challenging traffic types. In fact, this integrated approach is the only known way to control protocol-agile applications like the Ultrasurf proxy. Untangle users can think about the IRE as a voting expert system that accepts inputs from all Untangle filters and then meters out blended control responses based on threat type and policy.

In March, 2012, Untangle released a new appliance line, answering the request of customers for an easier way to deploy Untangle on certified hardware.[15]

In April, 2012, Untangle changed the content of the Standard Package to include both IPsec VPN and Application Control.[16]

In August, 2012, Untangle released Untangle 9.3, including full tunnel OpenVPN.

In January, 2013, Untangle released Untangle 9.4, including an all-new Captive Portal to work with its Integrated Rules Engine (IRE), allowing for varied use cases like mobile device management for bring your own device (BYOD) environments, integration with payment providers to support paid access for wi-fi hotspots, and separate policies for wi-fi and wired users. Other changes included an improved Session Viewer and new Host Table view.

In September, 2013, Untangle released Untangle 10.0, including HTTPS Inspector, a new app that allows Untangle to inspect traffic over HTTPS. This allows HTTPS traffic to be scanned by the full suite of Untangle applications and allow rules to be applied to it. Other improvements include IPv6 configurability, 802.1q tagged alias (VLAN tagging) support, a simpler and more powerful NAT implementation and better PPPoE support.

On October 1, 2013, Untangle acquired Cymphonix Corporation, an Internet management network appliance company.

On December 5, 2013, Untangle acquired some assets of eSoft, a UTM firewall company.

Recognition[edit]

Untangle was named winner of the security category in InfoWorld’s Best of Open Source Software Awards 2008.[17]

"If you're looking for a bundle of tools to do it all, take a look at Untangle. A popular VMware appliance, Untangle protects against viruses, spyware, phishing, spam, and other threats and nuisances, bundling the likes of ClamAV, Snort, SpamAssassin, OpenVPN, iptables, and other open source goodies with its own scanning engine. Untangle combines everything into a single server, and includes updates to the applications, various signatures, filters, and category lists along with nice reporting."

Products[edit]

Untangle provides software in two different packages, Standard and Premium. Premium offers network performance management and more robust content filtering. Both are sold as subscriptions.

Untangle applications include anti-spam, content filtering, antivirus, anti-phishing, anti-spyware, intrusion prevention, firewall, OpenVPN, router, and web cache software.[18][not in citation given]

Untangle's free applications are bundled in the Lite package, released under version 2 of the GNU General Public License (GPL), many components with the GNU Classpath exception. Certain third-party components distributed with the Untangle Software are licensed under other free license terms. Standard and Premium packages are under a proprietary EULA.[19]

Appliances[edit]

Untangle introduced its uSeries appliances in March of 2012 and mSeries in October of 2012. All appliances ship complete with software and are available with an extended warranty and cold spare.

Name Processor RAM Hard Drive Ethernet Ports Dimensions
u10 Intel Atom single-core processor 1 GB 160 GB, 7200 rpm Four gigabit Ethernet ports 7.1”(W) × 5.9”(D) × 1.65”(H)
u50 Intel Atom dual-core processor 2 GB 160 GB, 7200 rpm Four gigabit Ethernet ports 7.1”(W) x 5.9”(D) x 1.65”(H)
u150 Intel Pentium dual-core processor 4 GB 500 GB, 7200 rpm Six gigabit Ethernet ports 7.1”(W) × 5.9”(D) × 1.65”(H)
u500 Intel Xeon quad-core processor 4 GB 500 GB, 7200 rpm Eight gigabit Ethernet ports 17.20”(W) × 18.00”(D) × 1.73” (H)
m1500 Dual Intel Xeon quad-core processors 16 GB 1 TB, 7200 rpm Eight gigabit Ethernet ports 17”(W) × 22.8”(D) × 3.5”(H)
m3000 Dual Intel Xeon six core processors 16 GB 1 TB, 7200 rpm Eight gigabit Ethernet ports 17”(W) × 22.8”(D) × 3.5”(H)

References[edit]

External links[edit]