Up! Live in Chicago

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Up! Live in Chicago
Video by Shania Twain
Released November 18, 2003
Recorded July 2003
Genre Live
Length 105:20 minutes
Label Mercury Nashville
Director Beth McCarthy-Miller
Producer Beth McCarthy-Miller
Shania Twain chronology
A Collection of Video Hits
(2002)
Up! Live in Chicago
(2003)
Up! Close and Personal
(2004)

Up! Live in Chicago is the third live video album by Canadian singer Shania Twain. Directed and produced by Beth McCarthy-Miller, the concert was held and filmed on July 27, 2003 at the Hutchinson Field in the south-side of Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois; there were over 50,000 attendants. The concert itself differed from that of the Up! Tour (2003–04), featuring divergent stages, setlits, and production. Behind-the-scenes footage was filmed during the same week, when Twain visited local landmarks and events. The concert film debuted on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) on August 19, 2003, and was watched by over 8.87 million viewers, becoming the second-most-viewed concert film on television, behind Celine Dion's A New Day... Live in Las Vegas (2003).

Due to its high television ratings, Up! Live in Chicago was released as a video album on November 18, 2003 by Mercury Nashville Records. Released both in standard DVD packaging and in a jewel case, it featured additional performances not included on the television presentation, and was received positively by music critics, who complimented Twain's interaction with the audience; however, some questioned her singing. The video peaked at number two on Billboard's Top Music Video sales chart, and was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipments of 100,000 copies in the United States. It was also certified platinum in Australia and gold in Austria and Brazil. Excerpts from Up! Close and Personal were used as the music videos for Twain's singles "She's Not Just a Pretty Face" (2003) and "It Only Hurts when I'm Breathing" (2004).

Background[edit]

Over three and a half years after her last live show, Twain performed a series of three outdoor concerts in Europe and North America in July 2003 to promote her fourth studio album Up! (2002). The singer scheduled the trek primarily because of her prolonged absence from live performances and to ensure playing a concert in the United States prior to her Up! Tour. At the time, it was to commence in September 2003 in Europe, although it ultimately did so in North America.[1] She said, "With the tour starting in September, I didn't want to miss the summer without staging a concert in the U.S. After living with these 19 songs [from Up!] and going through the recording process, it's time to get on stage and perform them."[1] She conceptualized the shows to consist mainly of uptempo numbers and to be almost void of ballads to "spend the night rocking" and maintain an energized spirit. She also deliberately left much room for improvisation, stating that she preferred for the performances to be very spontaneous, than choreographed and music video-like.[1] Twain first performed on July 5, 2003 at Nowlan Park in Kilkenny, Ireland,[2] and then on July 12, 2003 at Hyde Park in London, England[3] with a setlist composed of twenty-two songs.

The singer then headed to Chicago, Illinois to perform a free outdoor concert on July 27, 2003, held at the Hutchinson Field in the south-side of Grant Park.[4] Meanwhile, the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) was seeking an artist to host a prime time television music special, and contacted Twain to discuss the possibilities of filming the concert in Chicago. NBC executives sought Twain for the special because she was a well-established artist with a lengthy career and crossover history that could draw in more viewers. She accepted the offer, and the show was directed and produced by Beth McCarthy-Miller.[1] Prior to performing at Grant Park, Twain spent a week in Chicago to film behind-the-scenes footage that would be used for the television special. She visited landmarks and attended local events, such as a Chicago Cubs game where she tossed the first pitch and sang "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" for the audience. The singer also took a riverboat trip and visited outposts of her favorite charity Kids Cafés, a program specialized to feed children in America.[1] The concert was produced by JAM Creative Productions, and sponsored by local radio station WUSN and the Chicago Tribune, which disseminated information about obtaining concert tickets.[5] The show was attended by over 50,000 people.[6]

Concert synopsis[edit]

"It's not a touring show. It's more the idea of a one-off. There isn't a dramatic theme or anything like that. It's pretty much a straight-ahead rock summer concert in the park. That's the feeling I want to give off. It's not the same sort of production direction you might take on a stadium tour. It's a much freer feeling than that, which is great. I've been off tour for three-and-a-half years. We haven't been onstage for so long, and for me, there's something fresh and exciting about it."[7]

—Twain speaking of the concert's difference from the Up! Tour (2003–04).

The concert's setlist consisted primarily of songs from Up!, with several hits from Twain's The Woman in Me (1995) and Come on Over (1997). The songs from Up! were not performed in a specific format from the three studio versions of the album. Twain desired to approach the live productions as their "own beast".[8] The show commenced with Twain, who was costumed by a yellow rash guard and black cargo pants, arriving from the back of the stage to perform "Man! I Feel Like a Woman!" alongside her band.[9][10] The singer then followed with "Up!" and continued to perform a total of ten songs during the segment.[10] At one point, Twain invited a male fan onstage, where he proposed to his girlfriend. She accepted and the two slow danced onstage as Twain sang "When You Kiss Me", sitting on a stool placed towards the end of the runway.[9][10] The segment ended with a performance of "I'm Gonna Getcha Good!",[11] where Twain invited several small children to join her onstage. The succeeding segment, where Twain donned a tan, multi-patterned halter top and black, sequined wide leg trousers, begun with "From This Moment On".[9] She then performed "No One Needs to Know" while playing an acoustic guitar[9] and "Thank You Baby! (For Makin' Someday Come So Soon)" with a small orchestra accompanying her.[10] Concluding with a performance of "(If You're Not in It for Love) I'm Outta Here!", Twain sung nine numbers in the second division of the show.[10] The singer, wearing a black, long-sleeve top with an American flag imprinted in the center and denim capri pants, returned to the stage for the third and final segment of the concert, the encore.[9][10] Twain first performed a rendition of "You're Still the One" again playing an acoustic guitar[10] and then proceeded to end the show with "Nah!" and "Rock This Country!".[9]

Release[edit]

The July 27, 2003 concert at Grant Park was announced as a television special, which was set to air on NBC sometime in August 2003.[4] Immediately after the show concluded, its premiere date of August 19, 2003 was specified.[6] The two-hour edited version of the concert was ultimately televised accordingly at 8:00 P.M. EST,[1] and received high ratings. Up! Live in Chicago was watched by over 8.87 million viewers in the United States, becoming the second-most-watched concert film on television, behind Celine Dion's A New Day... Live in Las Vegas special, which aired on CBS on March 25, 2003.[12] Following the film's success on television, it was released by Mercury Nashville Records on November 18, 2003 in Region 1[13] and on November 24, 2003 in Region 2.[14] The video was released in DVD format, both in conventional DVD packaging and in a jewel case;[15] both appeared in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1 (4:3).[13] The DVD release featured six additional performances that were not shown during the airing of Up! Live in Chicago on NBC, and both stereo and 5.1 surround sound mixes.[9] Up! Live in Chicago was also source to multiple media for singles from Up!. The performances of "She's Not Just a Pretty Face" (2003) an "It Only Hurts when I'm Breathing" (2004) served as the singles' music videos,[16][17] while the audio rendition of "It Only Hurts when I'm Breathing" was released as a live CD single and a digital download on March 9, 2004.[18]

Reception[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

Matt Bjorke of About.com reviewed the home release of Up! Close and Personal. He had not attended a concert of Twain's, nor had seen the television special, and was surprised by the singer's stage presence. He believed that the video would make Twain's naysayers realize that she was a good singer and even more of a great entertainer because of her interaction with the crowd. Bjorke concluded, "Up! Live in Chicago is a dynamic DVD experience that is sure to please fans for years to come."[9] Chris Jones of BBC noted the band's differences from that of a usual country band and wanted a more country-influenced sound. However, Jones complimented Twain's incorporation of the audience, naming it her "inimitable style".[11] He added that because of the live setting and crowd ambiance, the video was "far from [a] sterile experience", despite Twain's "photocopy-perfect" vocal delivery (something he suspected to because of a fair amount of post-production work). He stated, "Overall, you know exactly what you're getting with Ms Twain, and for her fans this is bound to be a very good thing indeed."[11] Bobby Reed of the Chicago Sun Times believed Twain failed to give insight as to who she was or her personality in the concert, noting she never mentioned her relocation to Switzerland or her then-new son, Eja. He complimented the band's strong, yet rote efforts of bringing the dense production to life. However, he said Twain's vocal delivery was at times a bit frail. Reed also noted the absence of any guest stars, in opposition to Twain's two previous concert specials, although he acknowledged inviting fans onstage did give the concert a country-fair vibe.[19] Mark Guarino of Arlington Heights' Daily Herald believed it was evident that the concert was specially tailored for television and stated that Twain played the proper host. He continued, "As the night wore on, Twain tried different ways, with varying degrees of success, to make the magnitude of such a large event work for the small screen. Her reliance on audience participation was an attempt to humanize things, but it often backfired."[20]

Commercial performance[edit]

On the week ending December 12, 2003, Up! Live in Chicago debuted at number three on Billboard's Top Music Video sales chart. Two weeks later, it reached its peak at number two.[21] The video spent fourteen weeks on the chart[21] before returning for a fifteenth and final week at number eighteen on the week ending March 12, 2005.[22] In March 2004, Up! Live in Chicago was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for shipments of 100,000 copies in the United States.[23] On the week ending January 17, 2005, Up! Live in Chicago peaked at number eight on New Zealand's Top 10 Music DVDs.[24] The video peaked at number sixty-one on the German Albums Chart, and spent a total of eleven weeks on the chart.[25] It was also certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) for the shipment of 15,000 copies in the country.[26] In Brazil, the video was certified gold by the Associação Brasileira dos Produtores de Discos (ABPD) for the sale of 15,000 copies.[27] In Austria, the video was certified gold by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) for the sale of 5,000 copies.[28]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written and composed by Shania Twain and Robert John "Mutt" Lange

No. Title Length
1. "Man! I Feel Like a Woman!"   4:14
2. "Up!"   3:32
3. "Honey, I'm Home"   4:13
4. "She's Not Just a Pretty Face"   4:15
5. "Forever and for Always"   4:21
6. "Ka-Ching!"   3:40
7. "When You Kiss Me"   7:17
8. "Don't Be Stupid (You Know I Love You)"   3:48
9. "That Don't Impress Me Much"   4:52
10. "I'm Gonna Getcha Good!"   7:35 Part 2
11. "From This Moment On"   6:07
12. "No One Needs to Know"   3:14
13. "Thank You Baby! (For Makin' Someday Come So Soon)"   4:09
14. "It Only Hurts when I'm Breathing"   3:46
15. "Juanita"   4:19
16. "Whose Bed Have Your Boots Been Under?"   4:39
17. "Any Man of Mine"   4:13
18. "In My Car (I'll Be the Driver)"   4:40
19. "(If You're Not in It for Love) I'm Outta Here!"   5:51 Encore
20. "You're Still the One"   3:28
21. "Nah!"   4:59
22. "Rock This Country!"   6:24

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Charts (2003–05) Peak
position
German Albums Chart[25] 61
New Zealand Top 10 Music DVDs[24] 8
US Billboard Top Music Videos[21] 2

Certifications[edit]

Country Certifications
Australia Platinum[26]
Austria Gold[28]
Brazil Gold[27]
United States Platinum[23]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Source:[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Petrozzello, Donna (August 17, 2003). "Shania is 'Up' for prime time". Daily News (Mortimer Zuckerman). Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Shania Twain set to rock Nowlan Park". The Waterford News & Star. June 27, 2003. Retrieved July 25, 2011. 
  3. ^ Hanley, Lynsey (July 13, 2011). "With plugs like these, who needs sincerity?". The Daily Telegraph (Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved July 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Kot, Greg (June 6, 2003). "Shania Twain to give free Grant Park show". Chicago Tribune (Tribune Company). Retrieved July 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. (June 6, 2003). "Billboard Bits: Twain, Who, Eno, Bad Moon Music". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc). Retrieved August 12, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b Elder, Robert K. (July 28, 2003). "Shania Twain stirs the crowd in Grant Park". Chicago Tribune (Tribune Company). Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Shania Twain is 'Up!' and running in free concert". The Rochester Sentinel. The Sentinel Corporation. August 16, 2003. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ Hayes, John (August 19, 2003). "TV Preview: Shania Twain ups her ante with concert special and new tour". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Block Communications). Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h Bjorke, Matt. "Up! (Live in Chicago) - Shania Twain". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Twain, Shania (November 18, 2003). Up! Live in Chicago (DVD). Event occurs at 105 minutes. 
  11. ^ a b c Jones, Chris (December 4, 2003). "Shania Twain Up! Live In Chicago (DVD) Review". BBC Online. BBC. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  12. ^ Braxton, Greg (August 27, 2003). "CBS continues its summer vacation atop the ratings". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  13. ^ a b "Shania Twain: - Up! Live in Chicago: Shania Twain: Movies & TV". Amazon.com. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Shania Twain: Up! Live in Chicago [DVD]: Film & TV". Amazon.co.uk. Amazon.com. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Shania Twain - Up! (Live in Chicago) (Jewel Case): Shania Twain: Movies & TV". Amazon.com. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Shania Twain: Video: She's Not Just a Pretty Face". Umgnashville.com. Universal Music Group Nashville. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  17. ^ "It Only Hurts When I'm Breathing by Shania Twain". Yahoo! Music. Yahoo!. Retrieved July 21, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Shania Twain: Releases: It Only Hurts When I'm Breathing (Live)". Umgnashville.com. Universal Music Group Nashville. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 
  19. ^ Reed, Bobby (July 29, 2003). "Who is Shania Twain? It's a tough question.". Chicago Sun-Times (Sun-Times Media Group). Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  20. ^ Guarino, Mark (July 29, 2003). "Twain's free show tailored for TV.". Daily Herald (Paddock Publications). Retrieved August 5, 2011. 
  21. ^ a b c "Top Music Video". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 5, 2011. (subscription required)
  22. ^ "Top Music Video". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 5, 2011. (subscription required)
  23. ^ a b "RIAA – Gold & Platinum". RIAA.com. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  24. ^ a b "Top Music DVDs - Monday 17 January 2005". Nztop40.com. Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  25. ^ a b "Chartverfolgung Twain, Shania". Musicline.de (in German). Media Control Charts. Retrieved August 8, 2011. 
  26. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2004 DVD". ARIA.com.au. Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 
  27. ^ a b "Certificados". ABPD.org.br (in Portuguese). Associação Brasileira dos Produtores de Discos. Retrieved August 5, 2011. 
  28. ^ a b "IFPI Austria – Gold & Platin Datenbank". IFPI.at (in German). International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. Retrieved April 23, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Shania Up! Live in Chicago (2003) (TV) - Full cast and crew". Internet Movie Database. Amazon.com. Retrieved August 3, 2011. 

External links[edit]