Up 'til Now

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Up 'til Now
Compilation album by Art Garfunkel
Released Oct 28, 1993
Recorded May 1964-Aug 1993
Label Columbia
Art Garfunkel chronology
Garfunkel
(1989)
Up 'til Now
(1993)
Across America
(1997)

Up 'til Now is a compilation album by Art Garfunkel. The album is a mixture of three previously released solo tracks (including a track from The Animals' Christmas), seven new songs (including a duet with James Taylor and a track from an earlier recording session left off the Scissors Cut album), and two alternate takes of previously released songs. It also includes the acoustic version of Simon & Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence", taken from the duo's 1964 debut, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.. It was released in 1993 on Columbia Records.

The track "The Breakup" is a mock-up news flash of Art Garfunkel giving a serious Philosophical reason for the duo's break-up, with Simon continuously interrupting him, in an effort, as Garfunkel put it, "To be like Nichols and May...Hoping people won't take the break-up of Simon and Garfunkel seriously." [1]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Crying in the Rain" (Carole King, Howard Greenfield) (Duet with James Taylor. Produced by Taylor)
  2. "All I Know" (Jimmy Webb) (Alternate recording from 1989, with Jimmy Webb on piano)
  3. "Just Over the Brooklyn Bridge" (Marvin Hamlisch)
  4. "The Sound of Silence" (Paul Simon) (From the Simon & Garfunkel album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.)
  5. "The Breakup" (Spoken word with Paul Simon)
  6. "Skywriter" (Recorded live at the Royal Albert Hall with Nicky Hopkins on piano)
  7. "The Decree" (From the album The Animals' Christmas)
  8. "It's All in the Game" (Produced by James Taylor)
  9. "One Less Holiday" (Stephen Bishop) (From the Scissors Cut sessions)
  10. "Since I Don't Have You" (Joseph Rock, James Beaumont) (From the album Fate For Breakfast)
  11. "Two Sleepy People" (Hoagy Carmichael, Frank Loesser) (from the Penny Marshall film, A League of Their Own)
  12. "Why Worry" (Mark Knopfler)
  13. "All My Love's Laughter" (Jimmy Webb) (Alternate recording from 1989)

References[edit]