Upper Providence Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania

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Upper Providence Township
Home Rule Municipality
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Delaware
Population 10,142 (2010)

Upper Providence Township is a census-designated place and township in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States, located around and north of the borough of Media, and about 30 minutes away from center city Philadelphia. The population was 10,142 at the 2010 census.[1] Ridley Creek State Park is inside the township towards the northern edge and the township also contains Ridley Creek and Crum Creek . The township is zoned 98% residential, 1% commercial and 1% industrial, with minimal space zoned to commercial business.[2]

History[edit]

Historic worker's cottage on Bishop Hollow Road near Ridley Creek Park.

The area was settled about 1683 and formed into Providence Township. On October 17, 1683, the residents of Providence Township petitioned the Court of Chester County, of which they were then a part, to establish a road from Providence to Chester. The court approved the creation of Providence Great Road (now Route 252). Upper Providence Township and Nether Providence Township, Pennsylvania split in 1687. The borough of Media was formed in 1850 from pieces of both townships.

Water power was used extensively in the townships early history, with local mills including Sycamore Mills or Bishop's Mills built on Ridley Creek in 1718, Robinett Grist Mill (1687), Malin's Grist Mill (1770), Register's Nail Factory (1812), and Palmer's Mills (1802).

Rose Tree Tavern

Formal education began when local Quaker, James Turner, left money in his 1787 will to establish Blue Hill School near Chapel and Providence Roads. The Union Library on Sycamore Mill Road opened in 1813 and had over eight hundred volumes by 1843. Sandy Bank School opened in 1836, and was rebuilt 1905 and enlarged in 1926. Lower Banks School opened in 1872. The Rose Tree Union School District was established in 1947.

The Rose Tree Tavern, built in 1739, was a well-known inn in the late 19th century as a summer resort for Philadelphians. Steeple chase races and fox hunts were held there by the Rose Tree Hunt Club.[3] It still stands after having been moved to Rose Tree Park and was recently renovated, reopening its doors in 2011 as a tourism office.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 5.8 square miles (15.1 km²), of which, 5.6 square miles (14.5 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it (4.28%) is water. The noted Rose Tree Park is located in Upper Providence Township, but is owned and managed by Delaware County; the township does have other various parks, including Cherry Street Field, Houtman Park, Ray Roche Park, Louis Scott Park and Berman Park. The township's road system is made up of many local roads and a few major roads that are maintained by PennDOT, such as US 1, PA 252 (both Providence Road and Palmer's Mill Road), Rose Tree Road, Baltimore Pike, Bishop Hollow Road, Ridley Creek Road, Kirk Lane and others, with most traffic volume occurring at the interchange between PA 252 and US 1 (Media Bypass), where Kirk Lane and Rose Tree Road are also both within a tenth of a mile of the interchange and contribute to the traffic volume of the interchange area.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 2,008
1940 1,932 −3.8%
1950 3,598 86.2%
1960 6,059 68.4%
1970 9,234 52.4%
1980 9,477 2.6%
1990 9,727 2.6%
2000 10,509 8.0%
2010 10,142 −3.5%
http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls.

As of the census of 2010, there were 10,142 people, 4,137 households, and 2,791 families residing in the township.[1] The population density was 1,879.6 people per square mile (725.9/km²). There were 4,299 housing units at an average density of 768.9 per square mile (296.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.83% White, 3.90% Black or African American, 0.08% Native American, 3.05% Asian, 0.29% from other races, and 0.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.07% of the population.

There were 4,075 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the township the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $107,166, and the median income for a family was $130,450. Males had a median income of $99,848 versus $75,491 for females. The per capita income for the township was $55,532. About 1.3% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau - 2010 Demographic Profile Data". Retrieved 2012-11-27. 
  2. ^ Upper Providence Township miscellaneous
  3. ^ "Upper Providence Township". Upperprovidence.org. Retrieved 2012-11-27. 
  4. ^ "Rose Tree Tavern opens doors as tourism offices - Philly.com". Articles.philly.com. 2011-05-27. Retrieved 2012-08-20. 

External links[edit]