Upper Saddle River, New Jersey

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Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Upper Saddle River
Map highlighting Upper Saddle River's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Upper Saddle River's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°03′47″N 74°06′00″W / 41.063157°N 74.099976°W / 41.063157; -74.099976Coordinates: 41°03′47″N 74°06′00″W / 41.063157°N 74.099976°W / 41.063157; -74.099976[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated November 22, 1894
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Joanne L. Minichetti (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Theodore Preusch[4]
 • Clerk Rose Vido[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 5.281 sq mi (13.680 km2)
 • Land 5.261 sq mi (13.627 km2)
 • Water 0.020 sq mi (0.053 km2)  0.39%
Area rank 269th of 566 in state
10th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 259 ft (79 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 8,208
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 8,285
 • Rank 280th of 566 in state
46th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 1,560.0/sq mi (602.3/km2)
 • Density rank 328th of 566 in state
62nd of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07458[13]
Area code(s) 201[14]
FIPS code 3400375140[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885425[17][2]
Website www.usrtoday.org

Upper Saddle River is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,208,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 467 (+6.0%) from the 7,741 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 543 (+7.5%) from the 7,198 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] It is not to be confused with the neighboring borough of Saddle River (although it uses Saddle River's zip code).

History[edit]

Upper Saddle River was settled in the 18th century principally by Dutch settlers who built mills along the Saddle River. The area was granted borough status in 1894 and remained principally rural until the 1950s. The suburban growth of New Jersey affected Upper Saddle River and surrounding municipalities, as the borough's population increased tenfold from 1950 to 1970. The population has remained fairly constant since 1970.

Hopper-Goetschius House Historic Marker in Upper Saddle River

Predominantly a residential community consisting of one-acre (4,000 m2) lots, Upper Saddle River also contains a library, police station, fire station, ambulance corps, municipal hall, and three primary schools. Commerce and industry are concentrated along the town's western border along Route 17. Postal service is shared with the neighboring borough of Saddle River.[13]

Upper Saddle River was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 22, 1894, from portions of Hohokus Township and Orvil Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.[19] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone. Upper Saddle River's referendum passed on November 20, one day after the referendum passed for Saddle River.[20] The name of the river, and hence the borough, is thought to come from early explores who thought that the geography of the area resembled that of the Sadle Burn, the valley surrounding a stream in the Scottish area of Argyll.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

Upper Saddle River is located at 41°03′47″N 74°06′00″W / 41.063157°N 74.099976°W / 41.063157; -74.099976 (41.063157,-74.099976). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 5.281 square miles (13.680 km2), of which, 5.261 square miles (13.627 km2) of it was land and 0.020 square miles (0.053 km2) of it (0.39%) was water.[1][2] The borough is bisected by the Saddle River, a tributary of the Passaic River.

It is bounded by eight municipalities: Montvale, Saddle River, Ramsey, and Mahwah, as well as small portions of Woodcliff Lake and Allendale in Bergen County, New Jersey, and Chestnut Ridge and Airmont in Rockland County, New York.

The borough is served by several major highways, including the Garden State Parkway at exits 172 and 171 in Montvale and Woodcliff Lake, and Route 17, which runs through the borough, though some portions of Upper Saddle River are served by roads located in Saddle River, Ramsey and Mahwah.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 326
1910 273 −16.3%
1920 251 −8.1%
1930 347 38.2%
1940 510 47.0%
1950 706 38.4%
1960 3,570 405.7%
1970 7,949 122.7%
1980 7,958 0.1%
1990 7,198 −9.6%
2000 7,741 7.5%
2010 8,208 6.0%
Est. 2012 8,285 [11] 0.9%
Population sources:
1900-1920[23] 1910[24]
1910-1930[25] 1900-2010[26][27][28]
2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

Along with the neighboring borough of Saddle River (ranked number 2), Upper Saddle River (at number 22) has traditionally ranked at and near the highest per-capita income in New Jersey.[citation needed] Recent development of low-income housing and associated population expansion has shifted the borough's standing slightly.[citation needed]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,208 people, 2,639 households, and 2,299 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,560.0 per square mile (602.3 /km2). There were 2,776 housing units at an average density of 527.6 per square mile (203.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 86.55% (7,104) White, 1.44% (118) Black or African American, 0.13% (11) Native American, 10.09% (828) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.48% (39) from other races, and 1.30% (107) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.33% (355) of the population.[8]

There were 2,639 households, of which 48.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.3% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.9% were non-families. 10.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.11 and the average family size was 3.37.[8]

In the borough, 30.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 18.0% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.9 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $175,399 (with a margin of error of +/- $22,259) and the median family income was $179,241 (+/- $47,207). Males had a median income of $160,795 (+/- $24,471) versus $67,885 (+/- $27,436) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $73,639 (+/- $8,085). About 1.5% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Same-sex couples headed 13 households in 2010, an increase from the 12 counted in 2000.[32]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 7,741 people, 2,497 households, and 2,242 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,462.7 people per square mile (565.0/km2). There were 2,560 housing units at an average density of 483.7 per square mile (186.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.24% White, 0.93% African American, 0.03% Native American, 6.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.18% of the population.[29][30]

There were 2,497 households out of which 47.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.6% were married couples living together, 4.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.2% were non-families. 8.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.09 and the average family size was 3.27.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 30.7% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $127,635, and the median income for a family was $132,401. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $51,587 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $57,239. None of the families and 0.7% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 2.1% of those over 64.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Upper Saddle River is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Upper Saddle River, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[33]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Upper Saddle River is Republican Joanne L. Minichetti, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Roger DeBerardine (R, 2014), Steve DiMartino (R, 2014), Jonathan Ditkoff (R, 2013), Vincent Durante (R, 2015), Joanne Florio (R, 2015) and Thomas Hafner (R, 2013).[34][35][36][37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Upper Saddle River is located in the 5th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[9][42][43]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[47][48]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[52] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[53] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[54] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[55] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[56] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[57] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[58] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[59] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[60] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[61][62] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[63] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[64] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[65][66][52]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,587 registered voters in Upper Saddle River, of which 996 (17.8% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,840 (32.9% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,746 (49.1% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[67] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 68.1% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 98.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[67][68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,726 votes here (65.3% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,405 votes (33.7% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 22 votes (0.5% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,174 ballots cast by the borough's 5,987 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.7% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,565 votes here (58.1% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,788 votes (40.5% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 29 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,415 ballots cast by the borough's 5,648 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.2% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[71][72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,671 votes here (61.5% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,635 votes (37.6% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 4,345 ballots cast by the borough's 5,319 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.7% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,830 votes here (63.8% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 899 votes (31.3% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 115 votes (4.0% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 9 votes (0.3% vs. 0.5%), among the 2,869 ballots cast by the borough's 5,620 registered voters, yielding a 51.0% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[74]

Education[edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Upper Saddle River School District. The schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[75]) are Robert D. Reynolds Elementary School[76] (grades PreK-2; 442 students), Edith A. Bogert Elementary School[77] (3-5; 454) and Emil A. Cavallini Middle School[78] (6-8; 480).[79]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend the Northern Highlands Regional High School in nearby Allendale, which serves students from Allendale, Ho-Ho-Kus, Upper Saddle River, and some students from Saddle River.[80]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[81][82]

Rodie Child Care Center, run by the YWCA of Bergen County, is open to children from 6 weeks old to 6 years old, including an all-day private Kindergarten class, and is located on Pleasant Avenue.[83]

Transportation[edit]

The borough had a total of 60.00 miles (96.56 km) of roadways, of which 51.56 miles (82.98 km) are maintained by the municipality, 7.83 miles (12.60 km) by Bergen County and 0.61 miles (0.98 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[84]

Route 17, West Saddle River Road, East Saddle River Road, and Lake Street are the main roads in Upper Saddle River.

Short Line offers limited service from stops on Lake Street and Saddle River Road between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[85]

Corporate residents[edit]

Pearson Education (formerly Prentice Hall), a scholastic division of Pearson is headquartered in Upper Saddle River.[86]

Onkyo USA is headquartered in Upper Saddle River.

The North American headquarters of Hunter Douglas are located in the borough.[87]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Upper Saddle River include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrator, Borough of Upper Saddle River. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Upper Saddle River. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 163.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Upper Saddle River, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Upper Saddle River borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 16, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Upper Saddle River borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 16, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  13. ^ a b Look Up a ZIP Code for Upper Saddle River, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 16, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Upper Saddle River, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 31, 2012.
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  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 87. Accessed February 16, 2012.
  20. ^ Harvey, Cornelius Burnham. Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey, p. 11, New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Company, 1900. Accessed September 15, 2013. "For a period of sixteen years following the passage of this act few boroughs were organized in the State, only three of them being in Bergen County.... As it was twenty-six boroughs were in the county from January 23, 1894, to December 18, of the same year."
  21. ^ History, Borough of Upper Saddle River. Accessed December 20, 2013. "There are a number of theories on the origin of the name Saddle River, but the most likely is that it came from two Scotsmen exploring the area in the 1600s who thought it resembled the Sadle Burn in their homeland."
  22. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey State Library, May 1945. Accessed December 20, 2013.
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  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed February 16, 2012.
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  27. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  28. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Upper Saddle River borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Upper Saddle River borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Upper Saddle River borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 16, 2012.
  32. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed March 19, 2013.
  33. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed December 20, 2013.
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  40. ^ Kleimann, Karen; Nolan, Sarah. "Allendale, Ho-Ho-Kus, Saddle River and Upper Saddle River kick off the new year", Town Journal, January 8, 2013. Accessed August 19, 2013. "Incumbent council members Vincent Durante and Joanne Florio took the Oath of Office, read by Mayor Joanne Minichetti. Both members ran unopposed in November."
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  56. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  57. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  58. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  59. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  60. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
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  75. ^ School Data for the Upper Saddle River Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  76. ^ Robert D. Reynolds Elementary School, Upper Saddle River School District. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  77. ^ Edith A. Bogert Elementary School, Upper Saddle River School District. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  78. ^ Emil A. Cavallini Middle School, Upper Saddle River School District. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  79. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Upper Saddle River School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 19, 2013.
  80. ^ Northern Highlands Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 19, 2013. "A four-year public high school, Northern Highlands strives to address the needs of all of its students, who come from four towns in northern Bergen County: Allendale, Upper Saddle River, Ho-Ho-Kus, and Saddle River."
  81. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  82. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 20, 2013.
  83. ^ ywFull Day Child Care. YWCA of Bergen County. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  84. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 19, 2013.
  85. ^ Schedule Details Upper Saddle River, NJ to New York, NY, Short Line (bus company). Accessed December 19, 2013.
  86. ^ Contact Us, Pearson Education. Accessed June 11, 2008.
  87. ^ The Hunter Douglas Legacy, Hunter Douglas. Accessed September 8, 2007. "Headquartered in Upper Saddle River, NJ, Hunter Douglas Window Fashions is the leading manufacturer of custom window coverings in North America, representing 50% of the Hunter Douglas Group sales."
  88. ^ Kitchin, Jessica. "The Phenom; At 16, Kristie Ahn is poised to be a tennis power.", New Jersey Monthly, March 18, 2009. Accessed December 19, 2013. "As the top-ranked junior tennis player in the country, Kristie Ahn has won countless matches, including those that secured her USTA National Spring Championship and Junior Fed Cup last year. But it was actually in one of her rare defeats that this 16-year-old from Upper Saddle River found the most joy."
  89. ^ Miles, Gary. "What They're Seeking Is Field Hockey Gold", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 5, 1998. Accessed August 21, 2011. "Team captain Beth Beglin of Upper Saddle River, N.J., recently named the head coach at the University of Iowa, and Californians Marcy Place von Schottenstein and Sheryl Johnson are back from the 1984 team. Johnson also serves as the team's vice captain."
  90. ^ via Associated Press. "Harold Dow, ’48 Hours’ Correspondent, Dies at 62", The New York Times, August 21, 2010. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Mr. Dow died suddenly Saturday morning in New Jersey, a network spokeswoman, Louise Bashi, said. He lived in Upper Saddle River, N.J., but it wasn't immediately clear if he had been at home. The cause of death was not announced."
  91. ^ "WES ELLIS JR., 52, GOLF PROFESSIONAL", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 6, 1984. Accessed August 2, 2007. "Wes Ellis Jr., 52, a professional golfer who dropped out of competition to be with his family, died Monday at Holy Name Hospital in Teaneck, N.J. He lived in Upper Saddle River, N.J."
  92. ^ McManus, Jane. "For Athletes in Motion, Real Estate Can Be a Burden", The New York Times, November 26, 2009. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Jets kicker Jay Feely bought his Upper Saddle River, N.J., home as a Giant in 2005 then returned last season as a Jet."
  93. ^ Staff. "Florida State Men Earn Seventh Consecutive ACC Indoor Title: Florida State men's track and field team took first place at the 2009 Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor Championship for the seventh-consecutive year and eighth title overall.", WCTV, March 2, 2009. Accessed February 22, 2011. "The men's 60m dash also included several Seminoles earning awards as Michael Ray Garvin (Upper Saddle River, N.J.) took the silver medal home with his second place finish and NCAA automatic mark of 6.59."
  94. ^ "New Voice - Opera announcer with a New Jersey accent", The Record (Bergen County), October 5, 2004. Accessed August 2, 2007. "In the world of opera, Margaret Juntwait, born and raised in Ridgewood and Upper Saddle River, has certainly achieved an enviable position. The Metropolitan Opera announced that the WNYC-FM classical music host with the seductively smooth voice will announce Saturday afternoon radio broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera."
  95. ^ Wakin, Daniel J. "Met Picks New Voice For Opera Broadcasts", The New York Times, September 29, 2004. Accessed August 2, 2007. "Ms. Juntwait, 47, was brought up in Ridgewood and Upper Saddle River, N.J., and went to work at WNYC in 1991. She lives in the Inwood section of Manhattan."
  96. ^ Adamek, Steve. "Kidd's secret recipe ", The Record (Bergen County), November 15, 2002. Accessed December 14, 2008. "Yet, Tuesday night at Jason and Joumana Kidd's Upper Saddle River home wasn't about eating, although Jefferson acknowledged that if not for the meal, he might have dined on 'potato chips' or fast food, or simply slept through dinner."
  97. ^ Levin, Jay (April 4, 2014). "Farewell to the father of Dove soap". The Record. pp A-1 and A-7.
  98. ^ Anderson, Dave. "The Grime and the Emptiness of N.F.L. Labor Disputes", The New York Times, March 19, 2011. Accessed March 20, 2014. "When the Giants returned from a Monday night road game, Parcells and his coaches usually went directly to Giants Stadium, slept for a few hours, if at all, then began preparing the game plan for Sunday’s opponent. Instead, Parcells drove to his Upper Saddle River, N.J., home and didn’t arrive at the stadium until Tuesday afternoon."
  99. ^ Feldberg, Robert. "Jason Patric stars in his father's hit play, 'That Championship Season'", The Record (Bergen County), February 13, 2011. Accessed February 22, 2011. "The money from That Championship Season enabled the family, which included Patric's brother and sister, to move to Upper Saddle River and a five-bedroom house on a large piece of land.... Patric (his given name is Jason Patric Miller Jr.) attended Cavallini Middle School, and then Don Bosco Preparatory High School in Ramsey."
  100. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; Lawrence Taylor, the Phantom of L. T., and the Hall of Fame in Canton", The New York Times, November 1, 1998. Accessed February 8, 2012. "Hoping to avert foreclosure on his home in Upper Saddle River, N.J., where he is reportedly $350,000 in arrears in mortgage payments and other fees, Lawrence Taylor, not L. T., declared Chapter 7 bankruptcy Thursday, four days after he entered an unidentified drug rehabilitation clinic in New Jersey."
  101. ^ McCarron, Anthony. "YANKS REEL IN VILLONE. TRADE WITH FISH BRINGS LEFTY HOME", Daily News (New York), December 17, 2005. Accessed December 19, 2013. "Ron Villone grew up a Yankee fan and still lives within 20 miles of the Stadium, in Upper Saddle River, N.J. So when he found out yesterday that the Marlins had traded him to the Yankees, the lefty's thoughts drifted back to the late 1970s, when he sat in the stands and marveled at Ron Guidry."
  102. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; What Parcells Didn't Say", The New York Times, January 22, 1993. Accessed March 20, 2014. "Young, when asked three weeks ago if his relationship with Parcells was still good, replied, 'I like to think so.' They live only about a mile apart in Upper Saddle River, N.J., but Young never even phoned his former coach."

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