Upper Township, New Jersey

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Upper Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Upper
Upper Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Upper Township highlighted in Cape May County. Inset map: Cape May County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°15′29″N 74°43′37″W / 39.258112°N 74.726912°W / 39.258112; -74.726912Coordinates: 39°15′29″N 74°43′37″W / 39.258112°N 74.726912°W / 39.258112; -74.726912[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Cape May
Formed April 2, 1723
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Richard Palombo (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Wanda Galione[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 68.687 sq mi (177.900 km2)
 • Land 62.149 sq mi (160.966 km2)
 • Water 6.538 sq mi (16.934 km2)  9.52%
Area rank 17th of 566 in state
2nd of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 12,373
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 12,187
 • Rank 197th of 566 in state
3rd of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 199.1/sq mi (76.9/km2)
 • Density rank 506th of 566 in state
15th of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08270 - Woodbine[12]
08230 - Ocean View
08223 - Marmora
08248 - Strathmere
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3400974810[13][2][14]
GNIS feature ID 0882047[15][2]
Website www.uppertownship.com

Upper Township is a large township in Cape May County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,373,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 258 (+2.1%) from the 12,115 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,434 (+13.4%) from the 10,681 counted in the 1990 Census.[16]

Upper Township was formed as a precinct on April 2, 1723, and was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township have been taken to form Dennis Township (March 1, 1827) and Ocean City borough (March 3, 1884).[17]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Upper Township as its 2nd best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[18]

During 2008, Upper Township was considering consolidation with neighboring Corbin City. Corbin City already shares extensively with Upper Township for municipal service, but the question of consolidating municipalities across county borders may be an obstacle to a full merger.[19]

Upper Township is home to the only yellow fire trucks in Cape May County, a tradition started in 1985 when the Seaville Fire Rescue Company was purchasing a new vehicle and thought that federal regulations would require the color.[20] Since being formed in 1964 and purchasing its first fire truck a year later, the Seaville company has served the area, responding to over 200 calls a year from its fire station is located on Route 50 across from Dino's Seaville Diner.[21]

Geography[edit]

Upper Township is located at 39°15′29″N 74°43′37″W / 39.258112°N 74.726912°W / 39.258112; -74.726912 (39.258112,-74.726912). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 68.687 square miles (177.900 km2), of which, 62.149 square miles (160.966 km2) of it is land and 6.538 square miles (16.934 km2) of it (9.52%) is water.[1][2]

Strathmere (2010 population of 158) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Upper Township.[22][23] Marmora is an unincorporated area within the township. The township contains many different communities and enclaves that create a diverse area reaching from Great Egg Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. Seaville is the largest community and Strathmere is the township's island containing a beach community.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,664
1820 2,107 26.6%
1830 1,067 * −49.4%
1840 1,217 14.1%
1850 1,341 10.2%
1860 1,552 15.7%
1870 1,483 −4.4%
1880 1,702 14.8%
1890 1,381 * −18.9%
1900 1,351 −2.2%
1910 1,483 9.8%
1920 1,272 −14.2%
1930 1,657 30.3%
1940 1,675 1.1%
1950 1,922 14.7%
1960 2,539 32.1%
1970 3,413 34.4%
1980 6,713 96.7%
1990 10,681 59.1%
2000 12,115 13.4%
2010 12,373 2.1%
Est. 2013 12,187 [10] −1.5%
Population sources:1810-2000[24]
1810-1920[25] 1840[26] 1850-1870[27]
1850[28] 1870[29] 1880-1890[30]
1890-1910[31] 1910-1930[32]
1930-1990[33]2000[34][35] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[17]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 12,373 people, 4,566 households, and 3,461 families residing in the township. The population density was 199.1 per square mile (76.9 /km2). There were 6,341 housing units at an average density of 102.0 per square mile (39.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.61% (11,954) White, 0.58% (72) Black or African American, 0.13% (16) Native American, 0.74% (92) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.72% (89) from other races, and 1.20% (149) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.36% (292) of the population.[7]

There were 4,566 households, of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.2% were non-families. 20.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.14.[7]

In the township, 23.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 20.2% from 25 to 44, 34.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $81,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,629) and the median family income was $97,372 (+/- $6,832). Males had a median income of $63,597 (+/- $2,442) versus $46,250 (+/- $4,552) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,702 (+/- $2,243). About 2.5% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[36]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[13] there were 12,115 people, 4,266 households, and 3,365 families residing in the township. The population density was 191.8 people per square mile (74.1/km²). There were 5,472 housing units at an average density of 86.6 per square mile (33.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.59% White, 0.69% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.28% of the population.[34][35]

There were 4,266 households out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.1% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.23.[34][35]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the township was $60,942, and the median income for a family was $68,824. Males had a median income of $46,528 versus $31,325 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,498. About 2.4% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Upper Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Upper Township Committee are Mayor Richard Palombo (term on committee ends December 31, 2015), Edward Barr (2015), John Coggins (2016), Antonio Inserra (2014) and Hobart "Hobie" Young (2016).[37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Upper Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[8][40][41]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[45][46]

The 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and Sam Fiocchi (R, Vineland).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Cape May County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year; At an annual reorganization held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Director and another to serve as Vice-Director.[50] As of 2013, Cape May County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton (Middle Township, term ends December 31, 2013),[51] Freeholder Vice-Director Leonard C. Desiderio (Sea Isle City, 2015),[52] Kristine Gabor (Upper Township, 2014)[53] and Will Morey (Wildwood Crest, 2014),[54] along with the vacant seat of M. Susan Sheppard expiring in 2013 that was vacated after Sheppard was sworn in as County Surrogate.[50][55] The county's constitutional officers are Sheriff Gary Schafer (Ocean City, 2014),[56][57] Surrogate M. Susan Sheppard (Ocean City, 2015)[58] and County Clerk Rita Fulginiti (Ocean City, 2013).[59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,154 registered voters in Upper Township, of which 1,403 (15.3%) were registered as Democrats, 4,454 (48.7%) were registered as Republicans and 3,287 (35.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 10 voters registered to other parties.[60]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.2% of the vote here (4,165 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama, who received 40.9% (2,980 votes), with 7,286 ballots cast among the township's 9,053 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.5%.[61] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 61.1% of the vote here (4,391 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry, who received around 37.6% (2,701 votes), with 7,192 ballots cast among the township's 8,988 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 80.0.[62]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.8% of the vote here (2,865 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 33.4% (1,655 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 6.3% (312 votes), with 4,954 ballots cast among the township's 9,341 registered voters, yielding a 53.0% turnout.[63]

Education[edit]

The Upper Township School District serves students in Pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,405 students and 111.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.59:1.[64] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Upper Township Primary School[66] (PreK-2; 467 students), Upper Township Elementary School[67] (3-5; 441) and Upper Township Middle School[68] (6-8; 497).[69]

Students from Corbin City, a non-operating school district, attend the Upper Township schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[70]

Students from Upper Township attend Ocean City High School in Ocean City as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Ocean City School District, along with students from Corbin City and Sea Isle City.[71]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 140.23 miles (225.68 km) of roadways, of which 74.84 miles (120.44 km) are maintained by the municipality, 36.95 miles (59.47 km) by Cape May County and 19.37 miles (31.17 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 9.07 miles (14.60 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[72]

The Garden State Parkway passes through and has two exits that provide access to Route 50 and U.S. Route 9 (since the Beesley's Point Bridge is closed). The Parkway connects Dennis Township on the south to Egg Harbor Township in the north.[73] at Interchange 20 for Seaville / Tuckahoe and Interchange 25 for Ocean City / Marmora via County Route 623.[74]

Other major roads that pass through include Route 49, CR 548 and CR 557.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Home page, Township of Upper. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2013 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2012, p. 8.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Upper, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Upper township, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Upper township, Cape May County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Woodbine, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  13. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  15. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  17. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 116. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  18. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  19. ^ Staff. "12 Months Later / Corbin City, Upper Township await word on merger study", The Press of Atlantic City, July 20, 2009. Accessed October 17, 2012. "In July 2008, Mayor Carol Foster went to Trenton to apply for a grant to study the possibility of eliminating her municipality.Corbin City and Upper Township officials had proposed a merger plan four months earlier, as state legislators slashed municipal aid and offered incentives for towns to conduct shared-services studies.... Corbin City, which is part of Atlantic County, already shares its library, schools, fire company, emergency medical services and municipal court with Upper Township, which is in Cape May County."
  20. ^ Leach, Ben. "Seaville firefighters stand out in yellow", The Press of Atlantic City, June 30, 2010. Accessed September 28, 2012. "For the past 35 years, residents living in Upper Township have been able to lay claim to the only yellow fire trucks in Cape May County."
  21. ^ History, Seaville Volunteer Fire & Rescue Company. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Strathmere CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed October 17, 2012.
  24. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cape May County Municipalities, 1810 - 2010, WestJersey.org. January 6, 2011. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  26. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 232, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  27. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 262, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed September 28, 2013. "Upper township was incorporated in 1798, and contained in 1850 1,341 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,552; and in 1870, 1,433." Population for 1870 of 1,433 conflicts with other sources.
  28. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  29. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  30. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  31. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  32. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed December 5, 2011.
  33. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 6, 2011.
  34. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Upper township, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  35. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Upper township, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 28, 2012.
  36. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Upper township, Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 30, 2013.
  37. ^ Meet your Committee, Township of Upper. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  38. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Township of Upper. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ a b Freeholders Home Page, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Gerald M. Thornton, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Leonard C. Desiderio, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Kristine Gabor, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Will Morey, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Cape May County Installs Returning Freeholder Leonard Desiderio and Names Director and Vice-Director, Cape May County, New Jersey, January 3, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder Leonard C. Desiderio, who was re-elected in November to serve a three-year term, was sworn in by Superior Court Judge J. Christopher Gibson.... Additionally at the meeting, Freeholder Gerald M. Thornton was re-elected Director of the Board and Freeholder Desiderio was elected Vice-Director."
  56. ^ Sheriff's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Sheriff, Cape May County Sheriff. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Surrogate, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ County Clerk's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  60. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Cape May, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  61. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  62. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  63. ^ 2009 Governor: Cape May County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  64. ^ District information for Upper Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  65. ^ Data for the Upper Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  66. ^ Upper Township Primary School, Upper Township School District. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  67. ^ Upper Township Elementary School, Upper Township School District. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  68. ^ Upper Township Middle School, Upper Township School District. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  69. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Upper Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 28, 2013.
  70. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed March 31, 2011.
  71. ^ Ocean City High School 2011 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 5, 2014. "Ocean City High School is a comprehensive high school serving the communities of Ocean City, Upper Township, Sea Isle City, and Corbin City, with an enrollment of over 1,250 students."
  72. ^ May.pdf Cape May County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  73. ^ Garden State Parkway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  74. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed August 5, 2014.

External links[edit]