Urethral cancer

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This article is about cancer of the urethra. For cancer of the ureter, see Ureteral cancer.
Urethral cancer
Classification and external resources
Urethral urothelial cell carcinoma.jpg
Micrograph of a urethral cancer, urothelial cell carcinoma, found on a prostate core biopsy. H&E stain.
DiseasesDB 31473
eMedicine med/3080
NCI Urethral cancer
MeSH D014523

Urethral cancer is cancer originating from the urethra. Cancer in this location is rare, and the most common type is papillary transitional cell carcinoma.[1]

Symptoms[edit]

Symptoms that may be caused by urethral cancer include:

  • Bleeding from the urethra or blood in the urine.
  • Weak or interrupted flow of urine.
  • Urination occurs often.
  • A lump or thickness in the perineum or penis.
  • Discharge from the urethra.
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in the groin area.
  • Most common site being bulbomembranous urethra.

Risk factors[edit]

  • Having a history of bladder cancer.
  • Having conditions that cause chronic, swollen, reddened part in the urethra.
  • Being 60 or older.
  • Being a white female.

Diagnosis[edit]

Diagnosis is established by transurethral biopsy. Types of urethral cancer include transitional cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and melanoma.

Treatment[edit]

Surgery is the most common treatment for cancer of the urethra. One of the following types of surgery may be done:

Chemotherapy as a form of Urethral Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy involves using drugs to destroy urethral cancer cells. It is a systemic urethral cancer treatment (i.e., destroys urethral cancer cells throughout the body) that is administered orally or intravenously (through a vein; IV). Medications are often used in combination to destroy urethral cancer that has metastasized. Commonly used drugs include cisplatin (Platinol®), vincristine (Oncovin®), and methotrexate (Trexall®).

Side effects include the following:

Anemia (causing fatigue, weakness) Nausea and vomiting Loss of appetite (anorexia) Hair loss (alopecia) Mouth sores Increased risk for infection Shortness of breath Excessive bleeding and bruising [2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ries, LAG; Young, JL; Keel, GE; Eisner, MP; Lin, YD; Horner, M-J, eds. (2007). "SEER Survival Monograph: Cancer Survival Among Adults: US SEER Program, 1988-2001, Patient and Tumor Characteristics". SEER Program. NIH Pub. No. 07-6215. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. pp. 251–262. Retrieved 18 October 2013.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  2. ^ Urethral Cancer Treatment