Uriah Smith

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Uriah Smith
Uriah Smith.jpg
Born (1832-05-03)May 3, 1832
Wilton, New Hampshire
Died March 6, 1903(1903-03-06) (aged 70)
Occupation Author, Inventor and Editor of Review and Herald of the Seventh-day Adventist Church

Uriah Smith (May 3, 1832 – March 6, 1903) was a Seventh-day Adventist author and editor who worked for the Review and Herald (now the Adventist Review) for 50 years.

Uriah Smith was a church leader, in addition to being a teacher, writer, editor, poet, hymn writer, inventor, and engraver. When the General Conference was organized in 1863, Uriah Smith was elected as its first secretary. This was a position that he subsequently held five different times. He was ordained to the gospel ministry in 1874. With the founding of Battle Creek College in 1874, Elder Smith became the Bible teacher, a position he held for the next eight years, the last two of which he was also chairman of the board. Uriah also served as General Conference treasurer from 1876-1877.

Uriah Smith produced many of the first illustrations that appeared in the Review and Herald. He also wrote a number of books, the most famous of which was Thoughts on Daniel and the Revelation better known just as Daniel and the Revelation.[1] In addition, Uriah Smith was an inventor who patented such diverse things as an artificial leg with a moveable ankle and a school desk with an improved folding seat. He died in Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1903, at the age of 70, from a stroke on his way to the Review office. [2]

His book Daniel and the Revelation became the classic text on Adventist end-time beliefs.

His sister Annie R. Smith was an early Seventh-day Adventist hymnist.

Early life[edit]

Uriah Smith was born in 1832 in West Wilton, New Hampshire. His family accepted the Millerite message and in 1844 experienced what has become known as the Great Disappointment. That same year, Smith had his left leg amputated due to an infection. Following the Disappointment, Smith lost interest in religion and commenced schooling at Philips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. In December 1852, he accepted the message taught by Sabbatarian Adventists which in 1863 became the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In 1853, he began working at the offices of the Advent Review and Sabbath Herald (now the Adventist Review), becoming its editor in 1855. His main contribution to Adventist theology was a commentary on the prophetic Biblical books of Daniel and the Revelation, but he also wrote extensively on conditional immortality and other topics. He advocated religious liberty, the abolition of slavery, and noncombatancy for Adventists.

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Preceded by
James White
Editor of the Adventist Review
1855–1861
Succeeded by
James White
Preceded by
James White
Editor of the Adventist Review
1864–1869
Succeeded by
J. N. Andrews
Preceded by
J. N. Andrews
Editor of the Adventist Review
1870–1871
Succeeded by
James White
Preceded by
James White
Editor of the Adventist Review
1872–1873
Succeeded by
James White
Preceded by
James White
Editor of the Adventist Review
1877–1880
Succeeded by
James White
Preceded by
James White
Editor of the Adventist Review
1881–1897
Succeeded by
A. T. Jones
Preceded by
A. T. Jones
Editor of the Adventist Review
1901–1903
Succeeded by
W. W. Prescott