User:Adam Silverstein2/sandbox

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Adam Silverstein (talk) 16:24, 4 September 2013 (UTC)

Life[edit]

Kenneth Carleton Frazier (born (1954-12-17)December 17, 1954) is the Chairman, President and CEO of Merck & Co. and the first African-American to lead a major pharmaceutical company.

Please note: This introduction is from Mr. Frazier’s current page. The reference supporting the claim that he is the first African American to lead a major pharmaceutical company is from the Harvard Law Review. The citation is below. Please see below. “ha1” is the same as what’s currently listed on his page and supports that he is “the first African-American to lead a major pharmaceutical company. His birth date is supported by “ap2010nov30.” This is reference #5 in your original notes.

  • native of North Philadelphia


Suggested text: Frazier is a native of North Philadelphia, one of the poorest parts of the city.

Please note: This claim is supported by “hepp1." This is reference #1 in your original notes.


  • father was a janitor

Suggested text: His father, Otis, was a janitor at the United Parcel Service and raised him and his two siblings.

Please note: This claim is supported by “hepp1." This is reference #1 in your original notes.


  • father’s name was Otis

Please note: We don’t suggest including "chen1" (reference #2 in your original notes). It requires the user to give the outlet access to a LinkedIn profile and is behind a pay wall. We stating his father’s name in the above bullet point and using “hepp1" instead.


  • Mother died when he was 12

Suggested text: Frazier’s mother died when he was 12.

Please note: This claim is supported by "dd." This reference #3 in your original notes.


Suggested text: His late father suffered from Alzheimer's disease, which Frazier says inspires him to lead Merck in its development of Alzheimer's medicines.

Please note: We would like to keep this, if possible, given Merck’s work in Alzheimer’s and Ken’s personal passion for it. The source is provided in the referenced section below.


  • graduate of Northeast High School and Pennsylvania State University

Suggested text: Frazier graduated early, at the age of 16, from Northeastern High School.

Please note: This claim is supported by “hepp1." This is reference #1 in your original notes. We would like to keep the “early graduation” statement. Please see the new citation below. Also, we suggest moving his PSU graduation and combining it with the other bullet points you have about selling tadpoles to make money in college.


  • entered PSU in 1971

Please see comments above (father's name was Otis) re: this reference. Please see below for how we combined PSU and Harvard


  • earned a law degree from Harvard University
  • graduated law school in 1978

Please note: We do not see that “hepp1" supports the claim that Mr. Frazier entered PSU in 1971. We suggest noting he graduated from PSU and using "hepp1" to support this. For the claim regarding his law degree, it is supported by “dd.” This is reference #3 in your original notes. Please see below for how we combined PSU, Harvard, and the tadpoles info.


  • Thurgood Marshall was one of his heroes growing up
  • Sold tadpoles and newts to local stores to make money in college


Suggested text: Fraizer has said Thurgood Marshall was one of his heroes growing up. He completed his undergraduate studies at Pennsylvania State University and sold tadpoles and newts to local stores to make money in college.

Please note: The claim regarding PSU is supported by "dd," which is reference #3 in your original notes. The claim regarding tadpoles is supported by “hepp1.” This is reference #1 in your original notes. We would suggest moving this above his law school degree to maintain chronological order.

Drinker Biddle[edit]

  • joined Drinker Biddle in 1978

Please note: We suggest not citing the year he joined. Please see comments above (bullet point: graduated law school in 1978)

  • partner at Drinker Biddle & Reath

Please see below


  • He began his law career at Drinker Biddle & Reath in Philadelphia.

Suggested text: He began his law career at Drinker Biddle & Reath in Philadelphia and was a partner at the firm. Please note: The claims about both his working for and being a partner at Drinker are supported by "hepp1." This is reference #1 in your original notes.'

  • While there, he and two colleagues began working on the case of James Willie “Bo” Cochran, an Alabama man on death row
  • Frazier and his colleagues represented Cochran on a pro bono basis
  • Cochran accused of murdering an assistant manager at a Birmingham grocery store
  • Arrested in November 1976
  • 11th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned his conviction in 1995
  • Retried in 1997 and found not guilty
  • Frazier took the case in 1991
  • Partner when he took the case
  • Continued to represent Cochran after joining Merck
  • Took four summer sabbaticals to teach trial advocacy in South Africa while at Drinker Biddle (ref2)
  • Represented Merck while at Drinker Biddle


Suggested text: While there, Frazier and two colleagues began working on the case of James Willie “Bo” Cochran, an Alabama man on death row. In 1976, Cochran was arrested, accused and convicted of murdering an assistant manager at a Birmingham grocery store.

Please note: The first sentence is supported by "dd." This reference #3 in your original notes. The second sentence is supported by "rogers1." This is reference #4 in your original notes.

Suggested text: Frazier and his colleagues took the case in 1991.

Please note: This claim is supported by "dd." This reference #3 in your original notes.

Suggested text: In 1995, after 19 years on death row, the 11th United States Courts of Appeals overturned his conviction. In 1997, Cochran was retried and found not guilty.

Please note: This claim is supported by "rogers1." This is reference #4 in your original notes.

  • married and has two children

Suggested text: Frazier is married to Andrea with two children, Lauren and James.

Please note: We suggest moving up to the “life” section. The reference here is "dd." Please see the referenced section below

Merck[edit]

  • Frazier joined Merck in 1992
  • Started at public affairs division

Suggested text: Frazier joined Merck in 1992 in the public affairs division as vice president, general counsel during the company’s collaboration with Astra.

Please note: This claim is supported by "pierson1." This is reference #6 in your original notes. We are also citing "ap2010nov30." This is supported by reference #5 in your original notes.


Suggested text: Within two years, he was leading the public affairs group. Please note: This claim is supported by "pierson1." This is reference #6 in your original notes.

  • Top legal post in December 1999
  • Frazier became senior general counsel in 1999
  • Top legal post in December 1999


Suggested text: He was named senior general counsel in 1999, promoted to executive vice president and general counsel by 2006.

Please note: This claim is supported by "pierson1." This is reference #6 in your original notes.


  • As general counsel, he was credited with overseeing the company's defense against Vioxx-related litigation.

Suggested text: As general counsel, he was credited with overseeing the company's defense against Vioxx-related litigation...

Please note: This claim is supported by "koppel." This is reference #7 in your original notes.


  • Over 5,000 lawsuits relating to Vioxx

Suggested text: and its nearly 5,000 lawsuits claiming Vioxx...

Please note: This claim is supported by "hepp1." This is reference #1 in your original notes.


  • Lawsuits claimed that Vioxx caused heart attacks and strokes

Suggested text: caused heart attacks and strokes.

Please note: This bullet point is supported by "dd." This is reference #3 in your original notes


  • Vioxx case was “the most significant challenge I’ve ever faced”

Suggested text:Frazier has said that the Vioxx case was “the most significant challenge” he ever faced.

Please note: This claim is supported by "dd." This is reference #3 in your original notes


  • From 2007 to 2010, he served as executive vice president and president of the company's global human health unit.

Suggested text: and led the company's largest group, human health, from 2007 to 2010...

Please note: This claim is supported by "koppel." This is reference #7 in your original notes.

  • In 2010, he became Merck's president

Suggested text: before being named president of Merck.

Please note: This claim is supported by “ap2010nov30." This is reference #5 in your original notes

  • President in April
  • on January 1, 2011 its CEO.

Suggested text: On January 1, 2011 he became CEO and a member of the company’s board of directors...

Please note: This claim is supported by “ap2012dec01." This was reference #5 in your original notes.


  • Succeeded Richard T. Clark as CEO

Suggested text: ...replacing former Merck CEO Richard Clark. He became chairman of the board on December 1, 2011

  • Merck is second-largest drug company in US
  • Was eligible for $11.25 million compensation in cash and stock in 2011
  • Base salary of $1.5 million in 2011

Suggested text: Merck is the second-largest drug company in the United States. In 2011, Frazier was eligible for $11.25 million in cash and stock and had a base salary of $1.5 million.

Please note: This claim is supported by "dd." This is reference #3 in your original notes

Penn State[edit]

  • On November 11, 2011, as a member of the Penn State board of trustees, the board selected Frazier as chairman of a commission empaneled to investigate a child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky and allegations of a cover up by university officials.

Please note: The article does not state that Frazier was selected by the board. It only states that as the “chairman of a newly formed committee” he would conduct “a thorough probe” We are open to your recommendations if you would like to change, but you may also leave as is.


  • Kenneth Frazier's commission retained the private law firm Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan as "Special Investigative Counsel" who then hired Pepper Hamilton, legal counsel for Merck. The report, costing the university $6.5 million, was accepted and used as the basis for the NCAA sanctions against Penn State.(unreliable?)

Please note: We are unable to confirm the reliability of this report.


  • Frazier was criticized by attorney William Cluck and other Penn State alumni for his role in the Penn State Board of Trustees' handling of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, particularly its decision to fire head football coach Joe Paterno.

Please note: We have not recommended any changes to this statement.


  • On March 14, 2013, while defending the Freeh report at a sub-committee meeting of the Penn State Board of Trustees, Frazier commented on William Cluck's race, saying "if you cared about that, you are one of the few people in this country that looks like you who actually believes the O.J. Simpson not guilty verdict was correct."

Please note: We have not recommended any changes to this statement.


  • Frazier apologized for his remarks to Cluck several days later.

Other[edit]

  • "Boards of Exxon Mobil Corp., Pennsylvania State University, Cornerstone Christian Academy in Philadelphia"

Please note: This claim is supported by “ap2010nov30." This is from reference #5 in your original notes. We suggest moving this up to the preceding section.


  • helped run CCA in the late 1990s

Suggested text: In the late 1990s, Frazier was a founding board member of the Cornerstone Christian Academy, an inner-city school K-8 school in Philadelphia, and currently serves on the board of trustees.

Please note: This claim is supported by "=happ1." This is from reference #5 in your original notes.

Suggested Section: Public Life[edit]

Please note: We are requesting this additional information be added, if possible.

Suggested text: In 2012, Frazier joined several CEOs who met with President Barack Obama to discuss deficit and debt reduction. Frazier said he supported tax revenue increases, including the top 2 percent, but only if accompanied by responsible spending limits. Frazier also discussed the importance of innovation and continued support for biomedical research.

Reference is cited in the section below.

Suggested text: On September 18, 2013, President Obama appointed Frazier as a member of the President’s Export Council to represent the views of business on the nation’s export policies and deep commitment to expanding U.S. exports.

Reference is cited in the section below.

Suggested text: He spoke at The American Law Institute’s 90th Annual Meeting in May 2013, on being a lawyer in private, in-house practice and from his current vantage point as CEO of Merck.

Reference is cited in the section below.

Suggested Section: Awards[edit]

Please note: We are requesting this as an additional section

*Frazier has been recognized for his advocacy in providing legal representation to underserved communities and for his personal pro bono work.

Please note: The reference is cited in the section below.


*2012: National Equal Justice Award from the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

Please note: The reference is cited in the section below.


*2008: National Legal Aid & Defender Association Exemplar Award for longtime service on behalf of low-income communities

Please note: The reference is cited in the section below.


*2004: Excellence in Corporate Practice Award from Association of Corporate Counsel for legal advocacy and counseling

Please note: The reference is cited in the section below.


*2003: Laurie D. Zelon Award (housed at Georgetown University Law Center) for pro bono work

Please note: The reference is cited in the section below.

Unsourced[edit]

Please note: we suggest deleting this, as we've covered above.


Referenced Section[edit]

Kenneth Carleton Frazier (born (1954-12-17)December 17, 1954) is the Chairman, President and CEO of Merck & Co. and the first African-American to lead a major pharmaceutical company.[1][2]

Life

Frazier is a native of North Philadelphia, one of the poorest parts of the city.[3] His father, Otis, was a janitor at the United Parcel Service and raised him and his two siblings.[3]

Frazier’s mother died when he was 12.[4] His late father suffered from Alzheimer's disease, which Frazier says inspires him to lead Merck in its development of Alzheimer's medicines.[5]

Frazier graduated early, at the age of 16, from Northeastern High School.[3][6] He has said Thurgood Marshall was one of his heroes growing up. He completed his undergraduate studies at Pennsylvania State University and sold tadpoles and newts to local stores to make money in college.[3][4]

Frazier is married to Andrea with two children, Lauren and James.[4]


Drinker Biddle

He began his law career at Drinker Biddle & Reath in Philadelphia and was a partner at the firm.[3]

While there, Frazier and two colleagues began working on the case of James Willie “Bo” Cochran, an Alabama man on death row. In 1976, Cochran was arrested, accused and convicted of murdering an assistant manager at a Birmingham grocery store.[4][7] Frazier and his colleagues took the case in 1991.[4] In 1995, after 19 years on death row, the 11th United States Courts of Appeals overturned his conviction. In 1997, Cochran was retried and found not guilty.[7]


Merck


Frazier joined Merck in 1992 in the public affairs division as vice president, general counsel during the company’s collaboration with Astra.[8][2]

Within two years, he was leading the public affairs group. He was named senior general counsel in 1999, promoted to executive vice president and general counsel by 2006.[8]

As general counsel, he was credited with overseeing the company's defense against Vioxx-related litigation and its nearly 5,000 lawsuits claiming Vioxx caused heart attacks and strokes.[4][9] Frazier has said that the Vioxx case was “the most significant challenge” he ever faced.[4]

From 2007 to 2010, he served as executive vice president and president of the company's largest group, the global human health unit before being named president of Merck.[9][2] On January 1, 2011 he became CEO and a member of the company’s board of directors, replacing former Merck CEO Richard Clark. He became chairman of the board on December 1, 2011.[10]

Merck is the second-largest drug company in the United States. In 2011, Frazier was eligible for $11.25 million in cash and stock and had a base salary of $1.5 million.[4]

Frazier sits on the boards of Exxon Mobil and the Weill Cornell Medical School and Graduate School of Medical Sciences.[2] In the late 1990s, Frazier was a founding board member of the Cornerstone Christian Academy, an inner-city school K-8 school in Philadelphia, and currently serves on the board of trustees.[2][11]


Penn State

On November 11, 2011, as a member of the Penn State board of trustees, the board selected Frazier as chairman of a commission empaneled to investigate a child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky and allegations of a cover up by university officials.[12]

Kenneth Frazier's commission retained the private law firm Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan as "Special Investigative Counsel" who then hired Pepper Hamilton, legal counsel for Merck. The report, costing the university $6.5 million, was accepted and used as the basis for the NCAA sanctions against Penn State.(unreliable?)[13]

Frazier was criticized by attorney William Cluck and other Penn State alumni for his role in the Penn State Board of Trustees' handling of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, particularly its decision to fire head football coach Joe Paterno.[14]

On March 14, 2013, while defending the Freeh report at a sub-committee meeting of the Penn State Board of Trustees, Frazier commented on William Cluck's race, saying "if you cared about that, you are one of the few people in this country that looks like you who actually believes the O.J. Simpson not guilty verdict was correct."[15]

Frazier apologized for his remarks to Cluck several days later.[16]


Suggested section: Work and Awards

In 2012, Frazier joined several CEOs who met with President Barack Obama to discuss deficit and debt reduction. Frazier said he supported tax revenue increases, including the top 2 percent, but only if accompanied by responsible spending limits. Frazier also discussed the importance of innovation and continued support for biomedical research.[17]

On September 18, 2013, President Obama appointed Frazier as a member of the President’s Export Council to represent the views of business on the nation’s export policies and deep commitment to expanding U.S. exports.[18]

He spoke at The American Law Institute’s 90th Annual Meeting in May 2013, on being a lawyer in private, in-house practice and from his current vantage point as CEO of Merck.[19]

Frazier has been recognized for his advocacy in providing legal representation to underserved communities and for his personal pro bono work

  • 2012: National Equal Justice Award from the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund[20]
  • 2008: National Legal Aid & Defender Association Exemplar Award for longtime service on behalf of low-income communities[21]
  • 2004: Excellence in Corporate Practice Award from Association of Corporate Counsel for legal advocacy and counseling[22]
  • 2003: Laurie D. Zelon Award (housed at Georgetown University Law Center) for pro bono work[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The new CEO of pharmaceutical giant Merck, Kenneth Frazier ’78 is driven by high hopes for the company and what it can do". Harvard Law School. 2011-06-28. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Biographical Info on Merck CEO-Elect Frazier". Yahoo News. Associated Press. November 30, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Hepp, Christopher K. (December 1, 2010). "New Merck CEO Kenneth C. Frazier has Philadelphia roots". Philadelphia Inquirer. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Merck New CEO Frazier Vows Innovation, Wider Markets". Bloomberg. November 30, 2010. 
  5. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Johnson, Linda A. (March 1, 2012). "CEO: Risks Key for Merck to Succeed, Help Patients". Associated Press. 
  6. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Randall, Tom (March 21, 2011). "Merck's Risky Bet on Research". Bloomberg Businessweek. 
  7. ^ a b Rogers, Lisa (March 26, 2005). "Cochran continues to inspire". Gadsden Times. p. B1. 
  8. ^ a b BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Pierson, Ransdell; Krauskopf, Lewis (November 30, 2010). "Merck elevates Frazier to succeed Clark as CEO". Reuters. 
  9. ^ a b BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Koppel, Nathan (November 30, 2010). "Another Lawyer Done Good: Merck Names Frazier CEO". Wall Street Journal / Law Blog. 
  10. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif "Merck's CEO to get $1.5 million yearly, incentives". BusinessWeek. Associated Press. December 1, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Cornerstone Christian Academy Board of Trustees". Cornerstone Christian Academy. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  12. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Sisak, Michael R. (November 11, 2011). "Committee promises thorough investigation of sex abuse at PSU". The Citizens' Voice. 
  13. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif "Review of the Freeh Report". Penn Staters for Responsible Stewardship. September 13, 2012. Retrieved September 27, 2013. 
  14. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Thompson, Charles (March 14, 2013). "Penn State trustee Ken Frazier fires back at Freeh Report critics". The Patriot-News / PennLive. 
  15. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif Horne, Kevin (March 15, 2013). "Ken Frazier Goes off on BOT Candidate". Onward State. (unreliable?)
  16. ^ BlueCheckBoxUnChecked.gif "Our View: Penn State trustee Frazier did more harm than good with outburst". Centre Daily Times. March 16, 2013. 
  17. ^ Linda A. Johnson (2012-03-01). "CEO: Risks Key for Merck to Succeed, Help Patients". Associated Press. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  18. ^ "President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts". WhiteHouse.gov. Retrieved 2013-09-27. 
  19. ^ "American Law Institute Annual Meeting 2013:Events". The American Law Institute. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  20. ^ "NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. 2012 National Equal Justice Award Dinner". Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  21. ^ "NLADA TO HONOR MERCK'S KENNETH FRAZIER WITH THE 2008 NLADA EXEMPLAR AWARD". 2008-03-21. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  22. ^ "ACC Awards". Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  23. ^ "Laurie D. Zelon Pro Bono Award". Retrieved 2013-09-04. 


{{Persondata <!-- Metadata: see [[Wikipedia:Persondata]]. --> | NAME = Frazier, Kenneth | ALTERNATIVE NAMES = | SHORT DESCRIPTION = | DATE OF BIRTH = December 17, 1954 | PLACE OF BIRTH = | DATE OF DEATH = | PLACE OF DEATH = }} DEFAULTSORT:Frazier, Kenneth Category:1954 births Category:Directors of ExxonMobil Category:Living people Category:Merck Category:Harvard Law School alumni Category:Pennsylvania State University alumni Category:American chief executives Category:Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences