User:Asiaticus/Henry Stanton Burton

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Henry Stanton Burton (1819 - 1869), graduate of West Point, rose to the rank of Colonel in the U. S. Army serving in the Second Seminole War, Mexican American War and the American Civil War.

Henry Stanton Burton was born at West Point, New York May 9, 1819, when his father, Major Oliver Burton, was stationed there. He received an appointment to the United States Military Academy as a cadet in January 1835, before he was sixteen years old and had to wait until he reached that age, to enter the Acadamy in the July term. He graduated with high marks and was offered a post in the engineer corps, but he preferred to serve in the artillery. On his graduation he was promoted Second Lieutenant serving in the U.S. 3rd Artillery Regiment. On November 11, 1839, he was promoted to First Lieutenant and on December 4, 1840 he married Elizabeth F. Smith. He served in the Second Seminole War, from 1840 to 1842. He was stationed at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina, until 1843, and then appointed instructor of artillery at West Point until 1846.

Mexican American War[edit]

After the Mexican American War was declared, Burton was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of Volunteers in the First Regiment of New York Volunteers, second in command to Colonel Jonathan D. Stevenson. Burton sailed from New York on September 23, 1846 with Company D, I, H and a portion of E on board the transport "Susan Drew" arriving at San Francisco on March 6, 1847. On March 31, he sailed with Companies A, B and E on the bark "Moscow" to Santa Barbara, arriving on April 8, to establish a garrison in the town. [1]

On the July 4, 1847 Lieutenant Colonel Burton was ordered to take La Paz, Lower California, sailing with Company A and B on board the storeship "Lexington". On July 21, the New York Volunteers landed at La Paz and peacefully occupied the port. On September 22, 1847 Burton was promoted by the U. S. Army to Captain.

On November 16-17, 1847 Burton's garrison repulsed an attack by the Mexicans in the Battle of La Paz. Following their defeat at La Paz and at Battle of San José del Cabo the Mexican force was reinforced and from November 27 until December 8, 1847 Burton's command held out against the Mexican Siege of La Paz.

Battle of Todos Santos


While in the Lower Country, Companies " A " and " B " withstood a siege of some thirty days at La Paz by the Mexican Forces doing duty in Lower California, and upon the arrival of the ship "Isabella" with Company "D" and 114 recruits, in March, 1848, the whole command, under Lieutenant- Colonel Burton, marched into the interior and dispersed the Mexican forces, which outnumbered the Americans five to one. On the 31st day of August, 1848, the Company embarked on board the U. S. Ship of the Line, "Ohio," and sailed September ist for Monterey, stopping at San Jose, del Cabo, near Cape San Lucas for Company " D," and on the i4th of October following- arrived in Monterey, Upper California. [2]


On the 5th of March, 1848, Company D sailed in the ship "Isabella" for La Paz, Lower California, arriving there on the 226. of the same month. At La Paz the Company was filled up to 100 men, from recruits which had recently arrived by the ships " Isabella " and "Sweden." One week after their arrival at La Paz, Lieut. -Col. Burton, with Companies A,- B and D, made a march into the interior, had an engagement with the Mexican Forces at Todas Santos, completely dispersing the enemy and driving them from the peninsula. After an absence of two weeks the command re turned to La Paz, and, on the i5th of April, Co. D embarked on board the U. S. Storeship "Southampton" for San Jose del Cabo, and within three days relieved the Naval Forces stationed at that town, which they continued to. garrison until the 6th of Sept., 1848, upon which date the Company hauled down the stars and stripes and evacuated Mexican soil. The Company embarked on the U. S. Ship of the Line "Ohio," which conveyed them to Monterey, Upper California, where they were discharged. This Company was without doubt the last command of American troops to leave the soil of Mexico after the close of the Mexican War. [3]



Colonel Burton was stationed at Fortress Monroe for a few months in 1859, after his return East. Soon afterward the civil war broke out, and General Scott selected him as one of the most trustworthy officers of the army, and he was placed in command of Alcatraz Island, in San Francisco harbor, for two years; and in 1862 he returned East again and took command of Fort Delaware, which was filled with prisoners. Thence he was ordered on detail service to erect fortifications around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from September 1863, to January 1864. Next he had command of an artillery reserve in the Richmond campaign of the Army of the Potomac; then of the artillery of the Eighteenth Corps until 1865, being engaged in the battles of Cold Harbor, Spottsylvania Courthouse, and at the bombardment of Petersburg, for which service he was brevetted Brigadier General in March, 1865. While erecting the works around Petersburg he contracted malarial fever, which resulted fatally, April 4, 1869, when he was but forty-nine years and ten months of age; he was buried at West Point.

[4]



January 1849 or July 9, 1849 married Ampara Ruiz Y Aranjo (Maria Ruiz) at Monterey, Calif.

May 14, 1861 promoted Major.

1861-1863 commanded Ft. Delaware, Del. military prison;

July 25, 1863 promoted Lt Col. serving in 4th U. S. Artillery Rgt.

Aug. 11, 1863 promoted Col., 5th U. S. Artillery Rgt.

1863-1864 commanded artillery reserve, Army of the Potomac; inspector of artillery in the Richmond campaign; in the Department of the East;

1864 member of the retiring board;

March 13, 1865 brevet brig gen., U. S. Army for capture of Petersburg, Va. commanded 5th U. S. Artillery Rgt. at Fort Monroe, Va. at Columbia, S. C. at Richmond, Va. and at Ft. Adams, R .I.

October 1868-March 1869 court martial duty at New York City;

April 4, 1869 died at Ft. Adams, Newport, R. I. and buried at West Point;

Col Henry Stanton Burton (1819 - 1869) - Find A Grave Memorial

References[edit]

  1. ^ Francis D. Clark, THE FIRST REGIMENT OF NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, COMMANDED BY COL. JONATHAN D. STEVENSON, IN THE MEXICAN WAR, George S. Evans & Co., New York, 1882. p.
  2. ^ Clark, THE FIRST REGIMENT OF NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, p.24
  3. ^ Clark, THE FIRST REGIMENT OF NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, p.32
  4. ^ Clark, THE FIRST REGIMENT OF NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS, p.32

External links[edit]