User:Dchmelik/Theism

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Autotheism[edit]

(Kat)henotheism[edit]

(Kat)henotheism may be the autotheism of 'great' historical Prophets or abstract or concrete numbers-based theism or polytheism.

  • Henotheism: The Philosophical viewpoint that there may be more than one deity, but one is supreme.
  • Kathenotheism: The belief that there is more than one deity, but only one deity at a time should be worshiped. Each is supreme in turn, or besides any ruling one, there is a supreme beyond all, e.g. 'Parabrahm,' i.e. 'Chaos.'

Number-based Theisms[edit]

Number-based theisms ('arithmo' -theisms) are mythologies/viewpoints with an idea about enumeration about God or gods.

Infinite Theism[edit]

The rest of number-based theisms can take this view with either pantheisms (even with autotheism) or polytheism: either one can be with henotheisms.

Atheism[edit]

As 'null theism,' atheism is not just its subjective Philosophical viewpoint opposing 'some theism' but is also the objective linguistic viewpoint opposing it: with no inherent viewpoint judgment, but it indeed allows clearest translation of 'theism' from English, i.e. without circular definitions! It does not fully conflict with the infinite theism of scientific (kat)henotheistic pan(en)theism, i.e. where the ideals of science are a Philosophical deity and the universe causes itself.

Monotheism[edit]

Monotheism is the viewpoint/belief that there is only one deity. [1]

  • Inclusive monotheism: The Philosophical viewpoint that there is only one deity, and that all other claimed deities are just different emanations from it or names of it. The Hindu denomination of Smartism is an example of inclusive monotheism: Hindu Philosophy that defines Parabrahm ('beyond God') as an ideal form (or beyond forms) which the Philosophical Monad 'The One' as a euphemism for the Absolute Monad (universal) 'The All' is an abstract type of 'monotheism' that has a more complex cosmology.
  • Exclusive monotheism: The belief that there is only one deity, and that all other claimed deities are distinct from it and false — either invented, demonic, or simply incorrect. Most Abrahamic religions, and certain versions of the Hindu denomination of Vaishnavism, such as ISKCON which regard the worship of anyone other than Vishnu as incorrect are examples of exclusive monotheism.
  • Monolatry: The belief that there may or may not be more than one deity, but only one should be worshipped.

The earliest known form of monotheism still in practice is Judaism.

Duotheism[edit]

Duotheism is either the idea that there is a distinct Goddess & God, or that, in the case of Mazdaism there is a good God and evil god.

Tritheism[edit]

Tritheism is what many people say of middle Christian era doctrine that each part of the Trinity is distinct. Tritheism is also an idea that there is a distinct Goddess & God and their child(ren,) but this is implied in that duotheism.

Heptatheism[edit]

Heptatheism is inherent to some Hindu and much of Old Semitic mythology, as well as to some extent, Mazdaism. In these mythologies, besides the causeless cause and first cause, there are six other creative spirits that worked with the first cause, and they generally together are also considered the 'entire' first cause emanating from the causeless.

Decatheism[edit]

Decatheism is inherent to some Hindu and much of Old Semitic mythology. In these mythologies, besides the causeless cause and first cause, there are six other creative spirits that worked with the first cause, and they generally together are also considered the 'entire' first cause emanating from the causeless.

Dodecatheism[edit]

Dodecatheism is the worship of the twelve main Olympian Gods.

Pan(en)theism[edit]

Polytheism[edit]

Polytheism is also divided according to how the individual deities are regarded.


Value-judgment theisms[edit]

  • Misotheism: the belief that some god or gods are evil.