User:DrRockzo/Daly

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Daniel Joseph Daly
A light blue neck ribbon with a gold star shaped medallion hanging from it. The ribbon is similar in shape to a bowtie with 13 white stars in the center of the ribbon. DanielDaly.jpg  A light blue neck ribbon with a gold star shaped medallion hanging from it. The ribbon is similar in shape to a bowtie with 13 white stars in the center of the ribbon.
Dan Daly, two-time Medal of Honor recipient
Place of burial Cypress Hills National Cemetery, New York
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch USMC logo.svg United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1899-1929
Rank Sergeant Major
Unit 6th Marines
Battles/wars Boxer Rebellion
*Battle of Peking
Banana Wars
*Second Battle of Veracruz
*Battle of Fort Riviere
World War I
*Battle of Belleau Wood
Awards Medal of Honor (2)
Navy Cross
Distinguished Service Cross
Croix de guerre
Médaille militaire

Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph "Dan" Daly (November 11, 1873 – April 27, 1937) was a United States Marine and one of only nineteen men (including seven Marines) to have received the Medal of Honor twice. of the Marines who are double recipients, only Daly and Major General Smedley Butler received their Medals of Honor for two, separate actions.

Dan Daly is well remembered for his famous cry during the Battle of Belleau Wood, when, besieged, outnumbered, outgunned, and pinned down, he led his men in attack, shouting, "Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever?"[1]

Daly was described by his fellow Medal of Honor double award recipient, Maj. Gen. Smedley Butler as,"The fightenist Marine I ever knew!" Daly reportedly was offered an officer's commission twice to which he responded that he would rather be, "...an outstanding sergeant than just another officer."

Biography[edit]

Daly was born in Glen Cove, New York, on November 11, 1873. By size he was a small man (5'6" in height, 132 lbs),[2] but had established himself as an amateur boxer.

Marine Corps service[edit]

Hoping to participate in the Spanish–American War, he joined the Marine Corps on January 10, 1899 and was sent to the Brooklyn Navy Yard for recruit training. However, the war ended before he was finished.

In 1900, during the Boxer Rebellion, he received his first Medal of Honor for single-handedly defending his position against repeated attacks and inflicted casualties of around 200 on the attacking Boxers.

His second Medal of Honor came fifteen years later. On the night of October 24, 1915, he was part of a group of 35 Marines who were ambushed by a force of approximately 400 Cacos (Haitian insurgents). He led one of the three groups of men during the fight to reach a nearby fort, and was awarded the medal for his conspicuous actions.

Daly's battle cry, delivered during the fighting in the Battle of Belleau Wood, in June 1918, came as the Marines were taking a terrific pounding on the outskirts of Lucy le Bocage at the fringe of Belleau Wood. Daly chose to order an attack, and, leaping forward, yelled to his tired men, "Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever?"[1] (Daly was, perhaps unknowingly, paraphrasing Frederick the Great who asked, on June 18, 1757 at the Battle of Kolin, "Kerle, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?") (Men, do you want to live for ever?). For this and other actions during the battle, Daly was awarded the Navy Cross.

Dan Daly retired from the Marine Corps on February 6, 1929.

Death and burial[edit]

Sgt. Maj. Daly is buried in New York City in Cypress Hills National Cemetery.

Daly died on April 27, 1937. He is buried in New York City in Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Section 5, Grave No. 70.

Decorations and honors[edit]

Medals[edit]

A complete list of Sergeant Major Daly's decorations and medals includes two Medal of Honor (The Medals of Honor are on display at the National Marine Corps Museum in Triangle, Virginia); the Navy Cross; Distinguished Service Cross; three Letters of Commendation; Good Conduct Medal with two bronze stars; China Relief Expedition Medal; Philippine Campaign Medal; Expeditionary Medal with one bronze star; Mexican Service Medal; Haitian Campaign Medal; World War I Victory Medal with Aisne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne and Defensive-Sector clasps; Médaille militaire; Croix de guerre with Palm; and the Fourragère (the last three awards are from the French government; only the Croix de guerre is authorized for wear by US personnel).

Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
1st Row Medal of Honor Medal of Honor
2nd Row Navy Cross Distinguished Service Cross Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal w/ 2 service stars
3rd Row Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal w/ 1 service star China Relief Expedition Medal Philippine Campaign Medal
4th Row Haitian Campaign Medal Mexican Service Medal World War I Victory Medal
5th Row Croix de guerre w/ Palm

Honors[edit]

The destroyer USS Daly (DD-519) was named for him.

On November 10, 2005, the United States Postal Service issued its Distinguished Marines stamps in which Daly was honored, along with three other Marine Corps heroes. Besides Daly, these stamps honored John Basilone, John A. Lejeune, and Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller.[1]

Medal of Honor citations[edit]

First award — 1901[edit]

DALY, DANIEL JOSEPH

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: November 11, 1873, Glen Cove, Long Island, N.Y. Accredited to. New York. G.O. No.: 55, July 19, 1901. Other Navy Awards: Second Medal of Honor, Navy Cross.

Citation:

In the presence of the enemy during the battle of Peking, China, August 14, 1900, Daly distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.[3]

Second award — 1915[edit]

DALY, DANIEL JOSEPH

Rank and organization: Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: Glen Cove, Long Island, N.Y., November 11, 1873. Accredited to: New York. Other Navy awards: Second Medal of Honor, Navy Cross.

Citation:

Serving with the 15th Company of Marines on October 22, 1915, GySgt. Daly was one of the company to leave Fort Liberte, Haiti, for a 6-day reconnaissance. After dark on the evening of October 24, while crossing the river in a deep ravine, the detachment was suddenly fired upon from 3 sides by about 400 Cacos concealed in bushes about 100 yards from the fort. The Marine detachment fought its way forward to a good position, which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a continuous fire from the Cacos. At daybreak the Marines, in 3 squads, advanced in 3 different directions, surprising and scattering the Cacos in all directions. GySgt. Daly fought with exceptional gallantry against heavy odds throughout this action.[4]

Navy Cross[edit]

Citation:

The Navy Cross is presented to Daniel Joseph Daly, First Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for repeated deeds of heroism and great service while serving with the 73d Company, 6th Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F., on June 5, and 7, 1918 at Lucy-le-Bocage, and on June 10, 1918 in the attack on Bouresches, France. On June 5, at the risk of his life, First Sergeant Daly extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump at Lucy-le-Bocage. On June 7, 1918, while his position was under violent bombardment, he visited all the gun crews of his company, then posted over a wide portion of the front, to cheer his men. On June 10, 1918, he attacked an enemy machine-gun emplacement unassisted and captured it by use of hand grenades and his automatic pistol. On the same day, during the German attack on Bouresches, he brought in wounded under fire.

Distinguished Service Cross[edit]

Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Sergeant Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, for repeated deeds of heroism and great service while serving with the Seventy-Third Company, Sixth Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F., on 5 and 7 June 1918 at Lucy-le-Bocage, and on 10 June 1918 in the attack on Bouresches, France. On June 5, at the risk of his life, First Sergeant Daly extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump at Lucy-le-Bocage. On 7 June 1918, while his position was under violent bombardment, he visited all the gun crews of his company, then posted over a wide portion of the front, to cheer his men. On 10 June 1918, he attacked an enemy machine-gun emplacement unassisted and captured it by use of hand grenades and his automatic pistol. On the same day, during the German attack on Bouresches, he brought in wounded under fire.[5]

See also[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

In Starship Troopers, a 1959 science fiction novel of social commentary written by Robert A. Heinlein in support of civic duty and martial service, the first chapter includes the paraphrase, "Come on you apes! You wanna live forever?"

A similar famous quote was made by Frederick the Great to his retreating army in 1757: "Kerle, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?" "Rogues, would you live forever?"[6]

A similar line turns up in the Gaunt's Ghosts series of novels: "Men of Tanith! Do you want to live forever?"

He is quoted in The Long Walk by Richard Bachman as "Come on you assholes, you want to live forever?". Bachman is a pseudonym for Stephen King, who attributes the quote to "An unknown top sergeant."

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Farwell, Byron (1999). Over There: The United States in the Great War, 1917-1918. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 170. ISBN 0393320286. 
  2. ^ "Double Congressional Medal of Honor recipient — Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph Daly". MedalofHonor.com. 
  3. ^ "Daly, Daniel Joseph (First Award)". Medal of Honor recipients: China Relief Expedition (Boxer Rebellion). United States Army Center of Military History. 
  4. ^ "Daly, Daniel Joseph (Second Award)". Medal of Honor recipients: Haiti Campaign - 1915. United States Army Center of Military History. Retrieved July 15, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Daniel Joseph Daly". Hall of Valor. Army Times Publishing Company. Retrieved 19 September 2009. 
  6. ^ q:Frederick II of Prussia

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.
 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.

External links[edit]