User:FloNight

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Sydney Poore
Wikipedian in Residence, Cochrane Collaboration
Sydney Poore

About me

I have been an active editor since 2005, and an administrator since 2006. I've created over a hundred articles and made thousands of edits. I have been a member of the Wikipedia English arbitration committee, oversighter, and CheckUser. Currently, I'm a member of the Wikimedia Foundation Fund Dissemination Committee.

My work

Disclaimer: I am currently a part time remote Wikipedian in Residence at Cochrane Collaboration Like most WiR, my primary role is to be a liaison between Cochrane and Wikimedia. When I am editing Wikipedia as part of my work at Cochrane, I always strive to strictly abide by Wikipedia's accepted practices on conflicts of interest and neutrality. I will always work in the best interest of Wikipedia, because that is in line with the Cochrane's educational mission, too. For more information, see the initial job posting Wikipedian in Residence at Cochrane Collaboration and the blog post announcement. See the FAQ that address my conflict of interest. User:FloNight/FAQ WiR

Contact me

sydney.poore@gmail.com

Useful links

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My articles about women and women's groups

My articles about interesting women and the groups that they were involved with. Most are short and still loads of work, so feel free to expand them.

2011

  • Anna Eliot Ticknor who started the Society to Encourage Studies at Home is called the mother of correspondence schools in the United States.
  • Ida A. Bengtson was the first bacteriologist hired by the United States Public Health Service's Hygienic Laboratory.
  • Beatrix Hamburg, American psychiatrist, whose long career in academic medicine advanced the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. She was the first African-American to attend Vassar College, and was also the first African-American woman to attend Yale Medical School. Her daughter Margaret Hamburg is the commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • Susan Wojcicki is an American businesswoman who is a senior vice president in of charge of product management and engineering at Google. Until recently she has been called "the most important Googler you've never heard of." Currently 16th on Forbes Magazine's List of The World's 100 Most Powerful Women(2011).
  • Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a Chippewa attorney. In 1914 Baldwin was the first Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law. She worked in the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, and was an officer in the Society of American Indians.
  • Gertrude Greene was an abstract sculptor and painter from New York, New York. Gertrude and her husband, artist Balcomb Greene, were heavily involved in political activism to promote mainstream acceptance of abstract art.
  • Adele Brandeis was an art administrator, who during the Great Depression of the 1930's worked for the WPA Federal Art Project and the Section of Painting and Sculpture. Brandeis did art-research for the Index of American Design, a comprehensive collection of American material culture, and managed the creation of visual artwork by local artists. Brandeis wrote for the Louisville Courier-Journal starting in 1945.
  • Rowena Spencer is an American physician who specialized in pediatric surgery at a time when it was unusual for a female to become a surgeon. She was the first female surgical intern at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, the first female appointed to the full-time surgery staff at Louisiana State University, and the first female surgeon in Louisiana.

2010

  • JoAnn H. Morgan is an aerospace engineer who was a trailblazer in the United States space flight program as the first female engineer at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) John F. Kennedy Space Center and the first woman to serve as a senior executive at Kennedy Space Center.
  • Patty Prather Thum was American painter and art critic. [1] Thum received an honorable mention for book illustration of "Robbie and Annie: A Child's Story" at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
March 2010
Women's History Month
Rhoda Fox Graves
(1877 – 1950)
Ann Baumgartner
(1918 – 2008)
Mildred "Micky" Axton
(1919 – 2010)
Mary Lilly
( – 1930)
Katharine Bement Davis
(1860 – 1935)
Bessie A. Buchanan
(1902 – 1980)
Mary Elliott Flanery
(1867 – 1933)
Sarah J. Garnet
(1831 – 1911)
Equal Suffrage League
Ida Sammis
(1865 – 1943)
Nell Scott
Caroline Conn Moore
Josephine K. Henry
(1846 – 1928)
Eliza Calvert Hall
(1856 – 1935)
Ellen Hardin Walworth
(1832 – 1915)
Women's National War Relief Association
American Monthly Magazine
Sally Ann's Experience
Aunt Jane of Kentucky
Anna Johnson Gates
(1889 – 1939)
Emma Guy Cromwell
(1865 – 1952)
Sara W. Mahan
(1870 – 1966)
Kathryn Morrison (legislator)
Rachel Berry
(1859 – 1978)
Dorathy M. Allen
(1910 – 1990)
Lillian H. South
(1879 – 1966)

My Images


Joshua Tree National Park.
Cholla Cactus Garden Nature Trail.



The Caudel House on Blythe Branch in Frenchburg, Kentucky served as a school, court house, and private residence of Thomas L. Caudel

.

Upper waterfall and Koi pond at Yuko-En on the Elkhorn, a Kentucky-Japan Friendship Garden.

Caboose at Historic Stanford L&N Railroad Depot
Historic Baughman Mill



Stream flowing from Boil spring to Final Sink at McConnell Springs park
Blue Hole, an artesian spring at McConnell Springs park.

Painter Thomas Satterwhite Noble's boyhood home in Lexington, Kentucky.
McConnell Springs Education Center



Gratz Park fountain
McConnell Springs, amphitheater with Education Center in background
Lexington Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Leestown Road Division


Close up view of Toccoa Falls with rainbow.
Waterfall at Yuko-En on the Elkhorn, official Kentucky-Japan Friendship Garden, is located in Georgetown, Kentucky
Royal Spring, Georgetown KY
Royal Spring, the main source of water for Georgetown, Kentucky since earliest settlement as McClelland's Station in 1775.