User:MaynardClark/AboutMe

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Maynard S. Clark
Web-Maynard.jpg
Maynard S. Clark
Born 20th century
USA
Occupation Vegan Advocate,
Social Reformer,
Civil Servant
Nationality American (USA)
Ethnicity European-American
Citizenship United States
Alma mater Wheaton College (Illinois), California State University, Harvard, Emmanuel College (Massachusetts)
Period 20th and 21st centuries
Genres philosophical, sociological, spiritual, ethical, practical
Subjects veganism, ahimsa, community organizing, business skills,
business procedures
transcendent ethical questions
academics
social history
futurism
Literary movement vegan movement
Notable work(s)

popular, vegan, serious

  • over 200 Wikipedia articles;
  • numerous book reviews;
  • talks on vegetarianism & veganism;
  • thousands of blog entries;
  • documentation for various businesses;
  • how-to-do-it articles on vegetarian organizing;
  • local vegetarian dining guides;
  • several book chapters
  • various other writings
Notable award(s)

Marquis's Who's Who;
most widely-read undergraduate,
California State University, Hayward, Hayward, CA
Hare Krishna Vegetarian Cookbook Award, ISKCON (2003)
St. Lawrence Fellowship

Massachusetts Software Council Fellowship
Spouse(s) single, never married (she would need to be a serious vegan)
Children none (loves children and animals)
Relative(s) Some of his relatives have been vegetarian for part of their lives; it is reputed that some still are vegetarian

maynard.clark.googlepages.com



User:MaynardClark is Maynard S. Clark of Boston. https://sites.google.com/site/maynardclark/ and Maynard (dot) Clark (at) gmail (dot) com

He is known for promoting vegan practice and values, founding several vegetarian organizations: Boston Vegetarian Society and Vegetarian Resource Center, urging vegetarians onto the Internet in the 1990s, starting the Boston Vegetarian Food Festival, and popularizing the word Vegan[1][2] as the core value and guiding principle in a growing system of maturing sophistication for purging harm and cruelty from all that human life does, individually or collectively, while enhancing its own (species and individual) vitality and ecological, economic, social, and geopolitical stability. Fairness for others translates this into physical security for others, at least at the "duty level" of not intending unwarranted injury to others ('dynamic noninjury' or ahimsa).[3][4][5] He is also known for his roles supporting famous Harvard Faculty, specifically Dan Wikler (HSPH) and Leon Eisenberg (HMS). Before that, he was known as "an effective bureaucrat" in various other settings - corporate and academic.

Though they are not structurally related, his current work in the medical ethics area is not discontinuous with work done in Joshua Greene's Moral Cognition Lab in the Department of Psychology located at Harvard University, which studies moral judgment and decision-making using behavioral methods and functional neuroimaging (fMRI). When Maynard was at Harvard Divinity School, he worked with Lawrence Kohlberg's stage theories of moral development and found them to be illuminating descriptions of moral reasoning, but not exhaustive explanations of the nature of right and wrong, good and bad. His work in those periods with youth groups of various ages involved institutionally-supported rudimentary efforts to do observations and implementation of the insights of early moral education protocols.

Maynard has studied many, many, many subjects, mostly in efforts at that time to stay ahead of that time period's "curve". Other family members also loved learning, and some had become 'lifetime students' but denounced such aspirations (or inclinations). While college and university Faculty are 'lifetime students' for pay, "the odds" of competing successfully are low, so why not seek a time-honored profession (or a job)? Life can be a series of forays into knowledge reservoirs and knowledge production, but with Wikipedia. he can constructively engage many topics ('giving back is widely encouraged'). Maynard S. Clark of Boston has been featured in Marquis Who's Who since the early 1990s.

Formative Early Years[edit]

Unremarkably, Maynard began life at a very young age and learned early some of the most basic lessons about taking from the environment what is needed: air, water, food, and both manufactured (clothing and more) and social (love, affection, education, language, insights) products. For most of us, much of our earlier living is quickly forgotten, then recalled later in life as being among the most important, formative, and satisfying of life's times. This section will not attempt to relive or chronicle those fondly-recalled events of early life. However, insights would be lost if one didn't recall and ponder the far-reaching social and psychological influences of his and other's earliest crises and the surrounding love of others, whoever they were at the time, in their then-present stages of development and maturity.

There's home and home influences of family friends and neighbors, who are discussed in person but not on the Internet.

Then there are the professional educators. As professionals often do, Maynard S. Clark took instruction under several great teachers; quite a large amount of this sitting under the tutelage of great teachers was outside or orthogonal to the credentialing educational system.

College Professors and Clergy

As most of their congregants realized, some of the clergy were extremely disciplined, smart, well-educated, wise, and pastoral in their commitments. Many were just excellent, and Harvard's instruction is often magnificent. College professors most admired during the undergraduate years included:

  • Arthur F. Holmes of Wheaton College (Illinois) - a borrowed book from Dr. Holmes (on linguistic philosophy applied to problems in Christian thinking) still sits on Maynard's current bookshelves, facing Maynard whenever he types at his computer. Holmes also had pointed out the economic context of some of these philosophic analysts and communicators; skilled craftsmen, business persons, physicians and lawyers, and more. Maynard and likely many others found curious that Thales wasn't so dumb. Based upon passages in his writings, it is believed that he made a fortune investing in the olive market of his time, though to many of us philosophy students he's known for teaching that reality is water. Heracleitus, who taught that 'all reality is flux' (or change) and that we cannot step into the same river even one time because it is constantly changing (like Wikipedia pages), is cited today by business school teachers.[6] That message could be absorbed and appreciated in today's global and constantly changing plurality of economies. And as Holmes would teach, the other careers, professions, and fields of competence aren't for the undisciplined or lame of brain. Disciplined intelligence is important for success in any field. Curious that so many of his students became Christian clergymen or taught philosophy, psychology, and related fields.
  • Holmes accepted the then-widely-taught 'historical bifurcation' of the Continental philosophers from the analytic philosophers?[7] It isn't universally accepted today, but some theorists still focus upon that perspective.[8] Was anything WRONG in this judgment? Citation of it has re-emerged in the 21st century.
  • How about the teaching of Holmes about multilinear historical evolution, that human history does not appear to be going to one place by an internal logic or conatus[9][10][11], but rather, from within those social and intellectual histories, a variety of different social and political goals are intended? Today, many folks believe that outlook differences should be constructively engaged to the point of resolution, for most differences can be 'overcome' rather than merely understood and appreciated and carefully explicated without believing or absorbing?
  • Arthur Holmes LOOKED very much like Dr. Aaron Bernstein, MD, MPH, Associate Director, Center for Health and Global Environment, Harvard School of Medicine; Physician in Medicine, Children’s Hospital Boston; Instructor in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School. Understanding one in terms of the other requires some sense of the role of organic molecules in living systems.[12] From there, it's a small step to the scientific study of nutrition, since the four (4) types of organic molecules in living systems are carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.[13]
1. Carbohydrates are organic compounds comprised of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Carbohydrates are made from single sugars (monosacharrides) linked together and provide cellular energy. Starch, made of many linked glucose molecules, is a primary example.
2. Lipids (fats, phospholipids, steroids, waxes) are nonpolar water-insoluble molecules. Lipids provide energy and are important in the structure and function of cell membranes. Examples include saturated fat (butter), steroid (cholesterol), and wax (earwax).
3. Proteins are amino acid chains and have many functions. They can be enzymes, to promote chemical reactions; they can have important structural functions like collagen does in your skin. They may structure ligaments, tendons, bones, hair, and muscles. They are found in fibers that help your blood clot. Proteins called antibodies help the body defend against infection. Other proteins in muscles enable bodily movement by allowing contraction. Another protein, hemoglobin, bonds with oxygen in its coursing through the body, transporting life-giving oxygen to the cells.
4. Nucleic acids are long chains of nucleotides (smaller molecules). Nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA, provide organisms with their genetic blueprints and coding and define who and what anyone is, structurally and functionally.

Reflecting decades later upon the teaching of Dr. Arthur Holmes may seem reminiscent of the small college professor featured in Irwin Edman's Philosopher's Quest.[14]

In the TV special "Eat, Fast and Live Longer" by Michael J. Mosley, the specialists at the Ethyl Percy Andrus Gerontology Center urged a low-fat high-fiber plant-based with WITH ADF for weight loss. Mosley didn't accept that; he preferred the very contrarian 5:2 diet. Maynard prefers the vegan nutritarian (Joel Fuhrman) version of a low-glycemic diet, which emphasizes low-glycemic vegetables[15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20], limits fruit [21] , and restricts all flour and refined grains and most whole grains, but 'fat lot of good that's going to do him' if he fails to follow the rigorous discipline.

Vegetables in supermarket in United States
A Venn diagram shows the overlap in the terminology of "vegetables" in a culinary sense and "fruits" in the botanical sense

Now, the SURNAME Andrus reminds him of several persons with that surname, including a minister who was also a musician with keyboards.

He recalls how some congregants had complained that Howard Andrus wasn't quite up to speed with the graduate-school level sermons that attracted seminary Faculty from the nearby Hamma Divinity School at Wittenberg University, but Rev. Andrus could certainly wow the congregants with his musical skills, though his musical style preferences (he was quite a showman) were far from what some congregants had grown to expect musically. Later internet searches suggest that he (now Dr. Andrus) has since completed his doctorate (from Cedarville University), counseled for ten years, and become involved with disaster relief from base in Asheville, North Carolina, for FEMA. What about climate disruption OR Biblical prophecy (which cynics call "Bible issues") as a background for his current understanding. To date, efforts to reach Dr. Andrus and to explore this with him have been unsuccessful.

Cal State Philosophy Department

  • One of his Cal-State undergraduate Philosophy Professors urged him to consider community organizing, presumably seeing in him something he hadn't recognized in himself.
  • Another of his Cal-State undergraduate Philosophy Professors urged him to consider a career in corporate human resources as a quick path to a highly-respected position, but one where opportunity levels off because of the quick ascent to power and respectability.
  • Yet another of his Cal-State undergraduate Philosophy Professors urged him to consider the study of the philosophy of religion at the Harvard Divinity School, a move considered totally foolish by his mother, but one which he seized - for better (and perhaps for worse!). However, studying the larger cultural setting that influences how we know or think what we think that we know, or that humans can know, can be one possible means for our "making the complex understandable" (words of Rush Limbaugh).
  • Finally, Dr. Robert Larsen of San Jose State University, who taught in both philosophy and the humanities, was well-loved because of his many courses in science and religion. He raised Maynard's awareness of the classical "theory of adequation" - that the rational mind is capable of knowing, that "mind" is "adequate" to the tasks of knowing (in some physical or other ways), a fundamental assumption of the possibility of knowing truth, a dimension of reason and rationality which must be carefully analyzed and considered.[22] What makes the mind "adequate" to such tasks. An active member throughout his adult life of Christ the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Dr. Larsen died September 17, 2006.[23]
  • In 2013, MIT announced that MIT (and Harvard) will begin offering MOOC courses with CalState, on twelve (12) California State University campuses through edX .[24] What might this seeming collaboration mean? Does it suggest that all CalState students are Harvard and MIT quality OR, alternatively (and not so impressively for any of the players - CalState, Harvard, MIT) that Harvard and MIT are offering something that the state universities haven't yet learned how to do?[25] Is Harvard merely looking for new sources of revenue[26][27][28] SJSU Professors (afer Dr. Robert Larsen died) raised a stink about Harvard's offering their Harvard courses free to the same world that includes SJSU. "Unfair!" they cried (as it threatens to put unionized philosophy faculty out of work with its deft playing of market dynamics around "knowledge reproduction" simultaneously through both teaching and publication).

Harvard Div School Faculty

Maynard's preaching professor at Harvard Divinity School was Rev. Dr. Gardner Taylor of the Concord Baptist Church of Christ, who preached Bill Clinton's Inaugural Sermon.[29]


Ever think that "other people" are just awful, or behaving dreadfully? HDS Counseling Professor Bill Rogers told the story of how he was tempted to request a vanity plate for his car (just a few years after Massachusetts first offered them as a source of additional revenue for the Commonwealth). Since he taught counseling in a major divinity school, perhaps 'Agape' should be on his plate - but his wife reminded him of his driving habits, so he changed his mind and decided that he shouldn't denigrate the word.

Maynard became vegetarian at Harvard Divinity School while thinking about "agape on his plate" and later met Holocaust survivor, Dr. Alex Hershaft, who to this day drives around Maryland with the "ahimsa" on vanity plate. Maynard got rid of his car in the 1980s as an justifiable expense and an unjustifiable polluter in a region where public transportation is widely available, the two political parties are totally backward on replacing the internal combustion engine, and

One of his several Harvard Divinity School Faculty urged him towards a nontraditional path towards religious leadership, perhaps under the tutelage of the late Dr. Dana McLean Greeley, past President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, who had taken a pulpit in Concord, Massachusetts, famous for Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Transcendentalists, which congregation at that time also had a student minister's quarters (which provided - or would have provided - both mentorship and a physical 'roof over his head').

His 'going public' changed all that (as if periodically standing in a public pulpit isn't 'going public'). If one IS going to 'be public' irreversibly, be some kind of (reluctant) 'example' (and use public transportation, as the current Pope Francis I did when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires).

He reflected on the religious liberalism of his time and the constant urge to drink (he's a teetotaler) and to eat experimentally (with no ethical qualms about what and whom one eats). He found that 'adventurous liberals' to be morally bankrupt and walked out unceremoniously. Today, getting out the knowledge that human research produces is a major challenge, where before, the core epistemological difficulty seemed to be on the order of 'how is anyone going to know anything?' Ah, yes - epistemological challenges. Does community-based fell-good do-nothing 'involvement' really make enough of a contribution to justify the effort? You decide! If one's appearance of 'religion' and 'religious vocation' is no more than a feeding line in an increasingly obese nation, of mopping up the damage from lifestyles gone astray, lifestyles one's liberalized mainline denomination has tacitly or overtly endorsed, how can anyone in good conscience or good faith be part of that charade? So, get out of the clergy if there's no real solution to offer from the role or community or faith (or its illusion).

That said, he was once offered (half jokingly?) a position with 'hidden money that no one wanted' teaching temperance and abstinence from alcohol to Native Americans (endowment money from the 19th century liberal Congregationalists).

Office of the Chaplain, Boston State Hospital, Mattapan (Boston), Massachusetts

Dr. Joseph R. Woodson (PhD, Clinical Psychology, 1911-1991[30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39], was associated with the Danielson Pastoral Counseling Center, a.k.a. Danielson Institute, at Boston University School of Theology.), Senior Chaplain of (the former) Boston State Hospital, is credited the the ECRI method of indigenous 'method of personal induction' which Maynard often cites for self-help mental health: Experience, Compare, Reflect, and Integrate. Other instructors during his days in the Boston State Hospital[40] chaplaincy employ were Boston psychiatrists Dr. David Limentani (now retired and living in West Chatham, Massachusetts), and Dr. Bessel van der Kolk.

One of Dr. Woodson's keenest quips about Maynard's career concerned the problem of seeking a leadership role in a group (of any kind) where everyone else believes that s/he is already a leader and that religious, moral, or other leadership is either redundant, or worse, an obstacle to their own self-realization. Of course, some leaders manage to subvert the leadership dynamic so that the constituency believes that they have leadership to give to others. However, the constituency find what their reject leader experiences with them: the general public rejects the leadership of the self-appointed 'avante garde' over their choices. What works in that dynamic is their leaders' helping them struggle with their issues with the public's rejection of their leadership.

New Hippocrates Health Institute ('New Hippocrates'), Medford, Massachusetts

When Professor David F. Kingsley (a scientific vegan), retired Professor of Biomedical Sciences from the State University of New York at Buffalo, sought to establish through clinical study a scientific evidence-based foundation for raw foods vegan lifestyles - 'natural hygiene' - he adapted the ECRI model to illuminate Kingsley's talks, emphasizing the role of clinical observation and comparison with available medical literature. That 'New Hippocrates' operation in Medford, MA, where Maynard had served on the Board, closed on Kingsley's death early in the 21st century, before he could effectively harvest the medical literature through the Internet. Kingsley was the author of several journal articles and the self-published book, Nutrimmune Therapy: A Vegetarian Approach to Healing Nutrition and the Immune System.[41] He had actively done secondary life sciences research through PubMed since its earliest days. The usefulness of Woodson's ECRI model was made quite evident in Kingsley's efforts in research, teaching, and advocacy. Those self-care advocates who sought to manage or 'be in charge of their own healthcare' could be clinically engaged with active researchers with relevant background and credentialing so that their self-exploration could be guided. Today, that is automated and powerfully enabled through online search, which he and Kingsley did not envision at the time. Still, Kingsley repeatedly emphasized the importance of clinical engagement as crucial for independent grounding for one's own self-care. Beyond clinical consultation, no viable healthcare delivery model was ever developed by New Hippocrates. Kingsley, reared a Roman Catholic, practiced Vipassana (meditation) with vegetarian friends and conducted a 'vegetarian Bible study' at St. Anthony Shrine, “The Church on Arch Street”, demonstrating how to read the Bible 'from left to right' as a vegetarian, for reading the Bible 'from the left' begins with a Creator who authors a purely plant-based vegan diet for the creatures. The hi/story of 'God in the Bible' repeats a number of vegetarian high points which invite serious reflection for a spiritually-minded reader who is searching for understand. Christians are urged to pray for understanding (Psalm 119: 33 - 48). David Kingsley often cited the then-new work of Dr. Herbert Benson of Boston's Harvard Medical School, who had written The Relaxation Response (1975) from his clinical studies of meditators from several different contemplative disciplines, including the Transcendental Meditation technique and Tibetan Buddhism. This book outlined Benson's secularized meditation which is designed to relax the meditators.

Profitable Employment[edit]

Maynard Clark at the Harvard Faculty Club

Maynard is presently available for work in research administration, preferably in the Harvard community. His recent Master's Degree in Management supports that career direction with its certifications and emphases in research administration. Currently, Maynard S. Clark of Boston supports population ethicist Dan Wikler, where they work on a full array of ethical issues, including but not limited to research ethics, clinical ethics of treatment adherence, adherence monitoring ethics, medical practice and access, compensation and redress, endemic diseases, reimbursement mechanisms, and a robust array of other research-related topics.[42] From 2007 until recently, he had been Program Manager for the annual Ethical Issues in Global Health Research course in the Department of Global Health and Population in the Harvard School of Public Health, previously known as the HSPH Department of Population and International Health. EIGHR was begun in 1999 with a 2-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to Dr. Richard A. Cash, a medical doctor teaching in GHP who is famous for developing oral rehydration therapy (aka ORT) in the developing world, with the 3rd party claim that Dr. Cash's ORT has saved more lives less glamorously and less expensively than all HIV work today. The intensive summer course, which has run successfully and profitably for 11 years, draws from the developed and developing world medical experts involved with designing, conducting, supervising, funding, or approving health research across several nations. After the hand-off of program materials, that EIGHR program is now run by the HSPH OHRA, Office of Human Research Administration, just around the corner from Maynard's office. He received for each year a 'Certificate of Participation' in Harvard's Ethical Issues in Global Health Research program.

He first stepped into Harvard School of Public Health in the days of John D. Graham, who founded the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis (HCRA). He has been employed by the Harvard Medical School of Boston since the 1990s. In the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, he has served (when GHSM was DSM) on the Green Team, the Website Committee, and the Social Committee and over the years (covering two decades) has volunteered for various special projects and events. For roughly a decade he served as Faculty Assistant to the late Dr. Leon Eisenberg, GHSM Department of Social Medicine Founder and former Chair, where they worked on 'everything that could possibly touch upon brain science.' The scientific prospects for such research are great, but how could much of this research ever be conducted ex vivo? Radio-imaging and modeling are useful tools, but only to the extent that they can predict actual physiological effects and their manifestations in the brain and body of the subject. They also realized that turning vast amounts of genomic data into meaningful information about the cell is the great challenge of bioinformatics (which hires mathematicians and uses no unconsenting sentient subjects - e.g. lab animals), with major implications for human biology and medicine. The avalanche or "tsunami of medical information coming from ongoing research" about whole genome sequencing and its impact on individually-customized or personalized medicine challenges the future practice of clinical medicine.

While at HMS, he worked on a series of two-day conferences for medical educators (with the late Dr. Leon Eisenberg) on the teaching of genetics of complex diseases to distinct and identifiable school medical constituencies (addressed in sequential years: medical students, medical residents, etc.). These were organized to prepare medical educators in various medical specialties (internal medicine, psychiatry, pediatrics, etc.) to integrate into medical school curriculum this tidal wave of research information in genomics to prepare current medical students for a future of clinical practice which predictably will have translated research results into practice breakthroughs. Today's medical students should expect profound changes in medical knowledge and professional practice, which may need a different kind of diagnostic skill for customized medicine. How will tomorrow's physicians be prepared or equipped today with the critical skills needed tomorrow for evaluating what ought to be weighed more heavily and what ought to be approached more cautiously?

Of course, he's interested also in genetics and nutrition, but do look at the massive Cornell-Oxford-China epidemiological project, which demonstrates the primacy of behavioral contributions to health outcomes, both in China and elsewhere.

He researched and archived the entire set of published writings of the late Professor Leon Eisenberg, MD, whom he had supported from 1999 through Dr. Eisenberg's death in September 2009. A nearly complete electronic archive of Eisenberg's 62+ years of writings and speeches will be available through the Center for the History of Medicine of the Countway Medical Library of Harvard Medical School.

H This user attends or attended Harvard University.
Flag of New England 1988.png This user resides in
New England




Before that, he studied in a variety of universities and graduate schools, including California State University, Hayward, Harvard Divinity School, Wheaton College (Illinois), Tufts University, etc. He was employed while studying at each school. He has worked in a number of Boston's finest corporations and tallest and finest high-rise buildings. Fidelity Investents owns several of these. During the most recent of his periods of employment with Fidelity, he did CIPP Certificate Training for the PSI Certificate (SP2I), a security credential.

Encore Careers

  • After full-time graduate student in research administration at Emmanuel College in Boston, Massachusetts, while continuing to work for the Harvard School of Public Health, Maynard received (May 2012) the Master of Science in Management degree (emphasis in Research Administration), and he received the Research Administration Certificate (Graduate Certificate in Research Administration) in December 20102. His thesis topic was the the business case for implementating smoke-free building policies in multi-unit residential high-rises, using the Charlesbank Cooperative in Boston's Mission Hill (across the street from the Longwood Medical Area) as his primary case study). [There he serves on the Finance, Landscaping, and Newsletter committees and is the Newsletter Editor.][43] and he also attends Harvard-sponsored classes in research administration at the Cambridge and Longwood Medical Area campuses.
  • He holds other research administration certificates from CITI, the National Institutes of Health (rDNA), Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard University (REACH Intermediate).
  • He also attended the Harvard Clinical Bioethics Course offered by the Division of Medical Ethics of the Harvard Medical School, for which he also received a Certificate of Participation.
  • He has studied related online courses at Harvard School of Public Health and elsewhere, including biostatistics and epidemiology. In addition to working, he frequently attends in the Longwood Medical Area expert lectures (unrelated to research administration as such, but rather in the core knowledge-production areas central to Harvard's mission).

Before Green Was the New Crimson[44][edit]

Way back when, Maynard's family visited the Seattle World's Fair and noted the monorail. Later, he visited in Seattle (at different times) some friends from Wheaton College and was able to RIDE in the Seattle Monorail (with much less excitement than he had anticipated during his youth).

Today he walks to work and rides public transportation, got rid of his private car years ago, and is talking with new friends bout the JPod urban transportation.

He's been active in urban recycling (worked intermittently with Cambridge, Somerville, Medford, and Malden (in their independently setting up their curbside recycling programs) and has served on the Green Teams of several Harvard academic departments. At Tufts, when he was in Electrical Engineering, he worked on the UEP-based Tufts team developing solid waste collection and handling (including cafeteria food waste composting). He has organized and hosted lectures in several venues on controversial 'green' topics (including vermiculture).

He explored preparing for a 'green' career at Tufts (first the BSCE in Civil Engineering then the MPP in UEP) but migrated elsewhere, miscalculating his financial resources.

He has served with several private nonprofits that have advised Greater Boston's MBTA, including the Association for Public Transportation (where he worked on the signage and other committees), which provided 'Friend of the T' reports to the MBTA planners and management. The Association for Public Transportation is a nonprofit organization founded in 1973 to encourage development of effective, accessible, and affordable public transport solutions in Boston, Massachusetts, and throughout the northeastern region of the United States.[45] The organization since 1977 has authored the transit guidebook, Car-Free in Boston, now in its 10th (2003) edition.[46]

The Vegetarian Part[edit]

The condensed story of vegetarianism in Maynard's life is in this Wikipedia user subpage.[47]

In the Bible, the Apostle Paul is charged with a 'tentmaking' ministry - he earns a living through manual labor, by selling his own custom-made tents to buyers, and this helps finance his ministry of outreach. Frank L. Hoffman's [2] 'made permanent' as 'Systematic Vegetarian Theology'some early insights into this period which Maynard shared with them in 1998 concerning his struggles with religious and moral values around being vegetarian and the desirability of vegetarianism.

Culinary Field

Maynard left the culinary field (he had cooked professionally in various places, including the Boca Raton Hotel and Club in Boca Raton, Florida, and had managed some restaurants in the San Francisco Bay Area) to study in the Harvard Divinity School, where he became vegetarian,[48] then a year later became vegan. He tried returning to the culinary field, but he suggests that he may not have been innovative enough at that time to have a sufficiently vegetarian then, or later vegan, culinary career, nor did he have the financial and strategic resources to buck then current trends in foodservice and to establish a professional career consulting in a field that had not yet become as well-developed for vegetarians and vegans as it is today. Also, hindsight (and keeping track of developments in one's fields) can provide clarity which had not previously existed. He's currently writing a business plan for volunteers and others in a 'Veganization Project' to illustrate how fast food chains and smaller food retailers could profit through vegan-friendly menu offerings.

One masterful touch has since been provided by vegan chef, Ken Bergeron, CEC, who has won gold and silver medals at the International Culinary Olympics, who through the summer of 2011 organized annually the food preparations and serving at the annual NAVS (North American Vegetarian Society) Vegetarian Summerfest (http://www.VegetarianSummerfest.org) and studied with Ron Pickarski, CEC. Chef Ken Bergeron wrote Professional Vegetarian Cooking.

Staunch Early Resistance to Vegetarian Ideas

Before attending graduate school at Harvard in Cambridge, where he became vegetarian then vegan (he has continued being vegan for over half his natural life now), he was designated a "most widely-read undergraduate" while at California State University in Hayward (CSUH has since become CSUEB, California State University, East Bay). Previously, he had long resisted 'going vegetarian' with the excuse, "I'm NOT a do-gooder."

Finding the Right Vegetarian (Vegan) Diet

Maynard attended scores of vegetarian and vegan, macrobiotic, natural hygiene, raw foods, natural health, and animal rights conferences. Different vegan diets and dietary ideas were presented there, and the ideas and practices needs to be tested against the emerging evidence bases from comparative research and clinical experience. He read numerous books and attended expert and lay-level practitioner lectures in relevant areas. The idea of 'evidence-based' diets was concretized more in his thinking as he worked with the writings and lectures of Dr. Leon Eisenberg. who emphasized evidence-based criteria in medicine and psychiatry. From there, framing an evidence-based nutrition standard for vegetarian living and nutrition seemed straightforward. The ethical issues around wanting truth and truthfulness in all advocacy seemed sufficiently evident to clearly warrant further work, although the notion had been clearly presented in vegetarian conferences by a number of advocates, including Dr. Carl Phillips, Dr. T. Colin Campbell of Cornell University[49], and, of course, medical doctors appealing to scientific evidence. The place of value judgments in advocacy remains an open topic of discussion; whether or not all vegetarian practitioners really care - in practice - that their dietary practice is evidence=based (e.g. do they merely want to kow the truth and then decide how aberrant they will be with snacks and junk food). The place of evidence in public practice, public policy, public health, and health recommendations remains a living topic of ongoing research and fervent discussion.

Vegetarian Community Organizer

As a vegetarian community organizer and planner and developer of events, he helped (with several national vegetarian organizations) to organize several national, continental, and international-scale vegetarian events, such as the 8th International Vegan Festival[50][51] (in San Diego, CA, in 1995), the Great American Meatout (organized by FARM, where he was regional or national outreach coordinator for several years in a row around the late '80s and early '90s), and the 1996 World Vegetarian Congress (held with NAVS in Johnstown, PA). He also developed the groundwork for the Boston Vegetarian Food Festival, organizing a team and helping directing its first several years of development, before passing the event over to the Boston Vegetarian Society, an organization which he ALSO founded in the mid-1980s. Further, during the late 1990s and the turn of the 21st century, he laid the groundwork of online networking among religious and specifically Christian vegetarians (both general and denominationally specific groups), which eventually emerged as the Christian Vegetarian Association (CVA) in 2002, after Rev. Frank L. Hoffman of New York developed the All-Creatures.org website portal, which hosts a CVA mirror site. Later, the more ecumenical SERV, Society of Ethical and Religious Vegetarians, emerged under the leadership of Dr. Richard Schwartz, and later Dr. Stephen Kaufman. He continues to 'organize' by talking with vegetarian businesses about how to improve their 'transformative' role in popular culture by advancing high-quality vegan products, services, and values. He has been involved with sales projects for companies that provided products and services to those practicing vegetarian diets and currently is involved with a possible business transfer of ownership for a Boston area vegan business.

VeggieSeek.com

Maynard's efforts to start vegetarian business have been less successful than his efforts to engender all volunteer nonprofit vegetarian social operations, such as the Boston Vegetarian Society, the Vegetarian Resource Center, and various vegetarian and vegan meetups throughout Boston. Vegan most of my life, he and colleagues concocted (the now defunct) VeggieSeek.com as a supply chain-oriented portal to enable profitability in a global supplier shift away from animal-derived foods and clothing towards non-animal foods (plants) and clothing (synthetic, natural plant fibers). The players in materials and foods needed business intelligence (and ready customers) to know how to earn money (at a time when earning large money was the appetite) in doing the right thing (or they would continue doing the wrong thing). The template was built by Dr. Ken Granderson, then of Inner City Software in Boston, but the team voted to bring down the supply chain business portal with lots of FREE bells and whistles for veg*an social networking, community organizing, and the like. The young entrepreneurs ran up against the economy, and VeggieSeek.com didn't fare very well between 1999-2001 because (a) the dot-com boom was (temporarily) ending and some (very famous) vegetarians (at that time) questioned the notion that a vegetarian should try to make a living from charging for a service (of any kind) provided to vegetarians and vegans, to the herbivorous communities.

SERV - Society of Ethical and Religious Vegetarians Maynard participates in SERV online discussions. SERV could be described as ‘Ethics Shop Talk’ about vegetarianism and animals and the practice of or thoughts about religion or any religions (or ethics), AND about the persons or groups that ADVOCATE either or both of those as all or part of their public messaging.

SERV's website describes it as: "SERV is an interfaith effort to gain a more humane, just, peaceful, and environmentally sustainable world. We believe that applying spiritual values to scientific knowledge encourages plant-based diets, with major benefits for humans, animals, and the environment."[52]

Reviewer Role in Publications

He has reviewed vegetarian and vegan, social science, and religion books since the early 1970s and continues to do so.

Legacy Online Duties

He continues to manage numerous online resources for vegans and vegetarians: some controlled-access networking venues, and some open-ended discussion venues. He currently combines ongoing intellectual and spiritual explorations with vegan buffets in Cambridge and Boston. Handing off these legacy responsibilities to capable and dependable volunteers would be greatly appreciated.

Early Efforts[edit]

Food Reform and Temperance

Much of Maynard's early fascination with vegetarianism had much to do with a 'continuing historical interest' in American temperance and food reform.[53] He is a nondrinker - a teetotaler, and the presence of Seventh Day Adventists and rawfooders (Natural Hygienists) spoke loudly to his interest in the health side of vegetarianism. He long had the health benefits of fresh air and the rights of all persons to not be invaded by environmental pollutants, whether produced by industry, motor vehicles, personal smoking, or added scents.

"Pure food reform emerged directly from Temperance and Abolition movements based in American religious revivalism" in the 19th century in America. The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was formed in 1874[54], and songs of the American temperance movement included "We have heard the joyful sound: YTC, YTC." (Youth Temperance Crusade). In that era, food reform was [art of American political and social progressivism. Thinking about revivalism and the Second Great Awakening was continuous with his experience at Wheaton College, and studying New England Transcendentalism at Harvard Divinity School brought it a curious twist.[55]

Agitation for prohibition began during the Second Great Awakening in the 1840s when Crusades against drinking originated from evangelical Protestants.[56] Evangelicals precipitated the second wave of prohibition legislation during the 1880s, which had as its aim local and state prohibition. During the 1880s, referendums were held at the state level to enact prohibition amendments. Two important groups were formed during this period. The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was formed in 1874.[57] The Anti-Saloon League was formed in 1893, uniting activists from different religious groups.[58]

Historically, animal advocacy was deeply intertwined with the redefinition of English-American Victorianism in "reckoning with the beast" (following the Darwinian naturalistic shift, which not everyone took literally in their focus on the moral meaning of paying attention to the vast expanse of human and nonhuman persons surrounding us in natural history). He wishes that his friend, biographer and historian Rynn Berry had lived longer so that they could have discussed more of what he could later read in the historical background of this topic

Soon after ????

Some of the ethics history work in his job relates to the history of eugenics in that period, widely practiced, including by Jews.

VINES - Vegetarians in New Energy Sources

Years ago, soon after Maynard had become vegetarian while at the Harvard Divinity School, he started a group called VINES - Vegetarians In New Energy Sources - vegetarians working in renewable energy. A fine line graphic of edible vines was used on the stationery (he still has some of that high quality VINES stationery).

During the working out of the organization's imagery and scope of work, he contacted scores of renewables researchers (imagine - in the late 1970s and 1980s!), and he contacted and/or was contacted by a number of early-stage researchers.

Living and working on Lois Lane in Charlton, MA, was a solar storage battery inventor (who was looking for venture capitalists). That battery inventor's idea was that sunlight is intermittent, so that energy had to be stored in batteries. Therefore, he was working on solar storage batteries. We may not know what direction that research went (or where that person is today or if he's alive today), but today, we plug that energy into the computer-controlled "smart grids" so that every input is distributed across the grid.

At Tufts University, the EOTC (Electro-Optics Technology Center) was interested in "smart windows" (thin films applied to glass or another substrate so that electrical power produced in those photo-electric dried thin films could be "drawn off" the surface and into electrical wiring so that they could be transformed into useful current (I) to heat or cool the building (climate control) and run "appliances" inside the building. The idea, was energy-self-sustaining buildings - standalone buildings through photochemistry.

Boston Vegetarian Society

The Seekers (Vegan)

The Seekers was an effort during the early 1980s to bring together a local in-person vegetarian (vegan) social network. It included in-house vegan potlucks, which attracted a handful of the thousands of local macrobiotic practitioners who had arrived to take instruction from Michio Kushi, Ed Esko, and others at the local KI or Kushi Institute at 17 Station Street, Brookline Village (near where Maynard currently lives and works at Harvard). The Seekers morphed into the Boston Vegetarian Society when someone asked, 'What do we call our group? Steve Hecht (then of Brookline) suggested that the name 'Boston Vegetarian Society' sounded august and that, long-term, they should envision owning an older downtown Boston building with their name, Boston Vegetarian Society, etched in stone across the entrance, from which downtown urban center they would organize and administer a series of vegan-oriented educational, lifestyle and member support, and community engagement programs. That suggested name was accepted with near unanimity, and early institutional visionaries set about to develop a decisionmaking structure (including Maynard and a few others). BVS formed, and eventually bylaws and articles of organization were developed (while Maynard was working at Tufts and he could recruit some 20-something vegans to work with him on the projects, which were delivered to BVS decisionmakers).

Vegetarian Resource Center Accomplishments[edit]

The Vegetarian Resource Center (VRC) is credited with:

  • Establishing on-line resources that have led to the founding of the Christian Vegetarian Association, several Muslim vegetarian networks, Sikh and Bahai vegetarian networks, and the Society of Ethical and Religious Vegetarians
  • Establishing the Boston Vegetarian Food Festival, the major organizing tool and fundraiser for the Boston Vegetarian Society. The 16th BVFF was held October 29-30, 2011, at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center. The 17th annual Boston Vegetarian Food Festival will held October 27-28, 2012, at the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center in the Roxbury Crossing section of Boston, near the Longwood Medical Area of Boston and {Mission Hill, Boston]].
  • Instigating community organizing discussions among vegetarians and vegans
  • Developing the very first vegetarian dining guide for Greater Boston (a current excellent vegetarian dining guide resource for Greater Boston is found on the website of the Boston Vegetarian Society)
  • The LOGO of the World Guide to Vegetarianism, founded and developed by Mark Wisdom, was adapted by Mark Wisdom for Vegetarian Resource Center (VRC)[59] and given to VRC, is seen widely around the Internet, as a public domain image. According to Mark Wisdom, VRC was the first to use his public domain image as an integral part of their vegetarian organization's logo.
  • Developing and maintaining the Vegetarian Resource Center Library in Central Square, Cambridge. In November of 1995, the holdings were moved to the Peace Abbey in Sherborn, MA, and became part of the New England Vegetarian Resource Library. Today, those holdings are archived (presumably with the University of Massachusetts Boston, which accepted some of the Peace Abbey resources and combined them in The Peace Room there at UMB, on the 5th floor of the UMB Healey Library).[60] Life Experience School members gather at the Peacemakers Table in the 5th Floor Healey Library at UMB most Thursday mornings at 11:30. am.

An earlier (1995? surely outdated in its content) version of the VRC's website reads (interestingly) that:

Mission Statement and Purpose:

  • The Vegetarian Resource Center was founded in 1993 to support the formation and development of local vegetarian societies, to contribute to the building of a strong, dynamic, cooperative vegetarian movement, and to manifest the diversity of that movement - throughout the world, first in New England, then in every part of North America, and in every area where V.R.C. can be of service.
  • To this end, the Vegetarian Resource Center has established what is hoped to be the first of many (thousands of) vegetarian resource centers, perhaps one in every burb and hamlet and post office, wherever humans settle and ponder their relationship with life and its manifold processes.
  • The collections of the Vegetarian Resource Center include various informational materials in the areas of vegetarian diet and lifestyle, including history of the vegetarian movement's policies and politics, personalities, and expressions, from the Ancients in the civilized world through the present. These useful collections, transferred from the Boston Vegetarian Society, and augmented by gifts from the American Vegan Society in Malaga, NJ; by Maynard Clark, and by numerous other donors, were for years stored in our office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; but in November of 1995, the holdings were moved to the Peace Abbey in Sherborn, MA, and became part of the New England Vegetarian Resource Library, administered by Beverly Rich.
  • These educational materials support research into these areas mentioned, and include 45 years of publications in areas of vegetarianism (for inquirers, check out the inquirers' page), expressing and looking deeply at many different dietary habits, philosophical approaches, and consumer issues, including animal rights, human health, human nutrition, ethics, environmental responsibility and stewardship (also, allocation of resources), spirituality, economics, and aesthetics.
  • For 2-1/2 years, the Vegetarian Resource Center was physically located in a heavily-trafficked commercial area of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and had occupied that old building since its founding in 1993. This downtown office had been inherited from the Boston Vegetarian Society, Inc., which was founded in 1986 by Maynard Clark.. The VRC assumed the lease of the space that had once housed the BVS office, and continued those more popular responsibilities to the vegetarian movement that the BVS Board, citing time and resource constraints, had at that time voted to not continue supporting, including organizational development, or encouraging and supporting the founding of other local vegetarian societies, the maintenance of a research and study library center, outreach to high school and college students, and a walk-in resource center.
  • In 1995, however, the Vegetarian Resource Library was moved to its current headquarters at the Peace Abbey in Sherborn, MA, at the intersections of Routes 16 and 27, where it is in a "stable" setting. Perhaps the most notable things about the Peace Abbey are Emily the Cow, a slaughterhouse escapee who leaped over a 5' fence to escape her executioners, hid for several months in a neighboring forest, and was publicly adopted by Louis and Meg Randa of the Peace Abbey; and the PA's annual "Courage of Conscience Award," which has been given to such notables as Michael Klaper, MD, Alex Pacheco of PETA, Gene and Laurie Bauston of Farm Sanctuary, Mother Theresa, and more.
  • But the Library is only a small part of what was begun by the VRC. In addition to setting up a study and research library and center, the Vegetarian Resource Center maintains ten (10) vegetarian e-mail discussion lists[61], and has produced a local vegetarian dining guide for the Boston area, where we are physically located, and has set up the Boston Vegetarian Food Festival at MIT and the World Vegetarian Day Festival celebrations on the Boston Common.
  • The Vegetarian Resource Center can be reached by E-Mail at vrc@tiac.net.[62] Caring and committed responses will be generated there, including information on how to locate other vegetarians in your locale and how to start and/or build your local vegetarian network.
  • The Vegetarian Resource Center cooperates with others whose goal is also to promote a wholesome, healthful, responsible, caring, intelligent, and farsighted way of living for all human beings (which necessarily includes vegetarianism).
  • The Vegetarian Resource Center is an affiliate of BOTH the North American Vegetarian Society and the Vegetarian Union of North America, and, through the IVU's arrangement with VUNA, the International Vegetarian Union.

Vegetarian Business Mentoring[edit]

Market Consulting

Maynard is often sought for advice on the feasibility of developing a certain business line (typically a food item or set of related food items) for vegetarian and vegan markets.

Selling Vegetarian-Oriented Businesses

Maynard is often sought by vegetarian entrepreneurs for advice on selling their businesses (typically restaurants or food production operations) which largely target vegetarian consumers (though the products may be vegetarian or vegan, not all the consumers are 'strict' about the diet). Reasons for selling may vary (and are confidential), but the challenges of continuing such businesses through recurring US and world economic crises are familiar challenges.

Teaching[edit]

Topical Talks

In addition to training and mentoring responsibilities for vegetarians and in the context of their employment, businesses, and/or advocacy, he gives public talks in vegetarian contexts. One of his more recent vegetarian-themed talks was (with journalist, blogger, and cartoonist Vance Lehmkuhl) at the 35th Annual NAVS Vegetarian Summerfest in Johnstown PA " 'Friend' is a Verb: Vegetarians and Social Media - the Ethics of 'Getting the Word Out'." Maynard is developing his PowerPoint skills.

Technical Teaching

He has also taught computer networking through South End Technology Center (SETC) in Boston (at the Harriet Tubman Center in the South End, but the program is headquartered in Tent City). He also taught computer repair and rebuilding through TecsChange in Boston.

Targeted Technical Tutoring

He spent two years tutoring fourteen (14) pre-nursing medical courses to one healthcare student who earned the Medical Assistant certificate and was top of her class in the core program and in her phlebotomy course. He continues tutoring (in several subject areas) "on the side" but not as an income source.

Certifying Participants' Exposure during 'Learning Opportunities' in Curriculum

Here's how he thought in the EIGHR/EIIHR intensive workshops in research ethics taught at HSPH:

  • To work in an area, one needs a body of knowledge. SMEs (subject matter experts) are polled to discern what that knowledge is.
  • Common, prescribed bodies of knowledge can be learned (often through experience and mentoring), and anything that can be learned can to some extent be taught)
  • When we HAVE a list of the issues that leaders in a field think are important, we can prepare a curriculum that EXPOSES current "practitioners" to those issues and, as they complete the EXPOSURE to quality presentations on the content of those knowledge areas, we can certify that they have been EXPOSED to those presentations.
  • If we VERIFY comprehension (and related reasoning skills) in those core areas of competence, they can "walk away with" a "certification"
  • If we DO NOT VERIFY comprehension (and related reasoning skills) in those core areas of competence, they can STILL "walk away with" a "certification" (which "represents") what people tend to MAKE of the certification.
  • In either case, the "certification" is worth what it represents, but it represents" to both persons who ARE thinking critical about the certification and to those who are NOT thinking critical about the certification.
  • Typically, a "certification" is either for-credit or non-credit, and it may have been graded or ungraded, and there may or may not be verification of comprehension of the core subject areas, and there may or may not be "testing" of "core competencies"
  • In business process, 'Report Cards' are often used. Teaching is a business process where both instruction and student learning can be 'graded'.

Avocations[edit]

Major religious groups as a percentage of world population.
Christian symbol (top-left), Islamic symbol (top-right), Jewish symbol (bottom-left), Bahá'í symbol (bottom-right)

Doing Science, Being Science

Others who share an interest in participating in clinical trials could visit SearchClinicalTrials.org.

Asian Languages, Cultures, People, Philosophy, Population Issues

Recently he has set up, administered, and hosted Mandarin chat in Harvard's Longwood Medical Area (LMA), and guest speakers (usually members) give bilingual talks (Mandarin AND English, so that everyone can learn a little about the topic and about the other language). The experience allows him to work on his weak Mandarin skills and to engage intellectually with highly-accomplished Asians, Asian students, and US travelers to Asian nations.[65]

Buddhism

He has been a regular at the "Dharma with Dinner" talks (and vegan dinners) at Cambridge's Greater Boston Buddhist Cultural Center. For several years, he brought his three vegetarian meetups and several other meetups there monthly for the $10 vegan buffets. Buddhism's approach to common existential issues (everyday truths about experience) is comparatively interesting when other wisdom and faith traditions are engaged actively and constructively. One could call that perspective "Buddhism along the way" over every Earthling's search for insight and understanding and a better life (hopefully with a coherent understanding of the whys and hows of vegan practice).

For a while, he was with the Medical Team of the Boston area Tzu Chi Service Center, which dispatches expertly-trained Buddhist healthcare professionals and emergency respondents to crisis settings, after environmental and other disasters. One worries about 'sowing confusion' by one's presence where confusion has already been sown but recent developments.

It's curious, for anyone who is watching him carefully, that he was attracted to two forms of Humanistic Buddhism, BOTH of which practice and encourage vegetarianism, and that he had and has NO interest whatsoever in ANY form of Buddhism that does NOT both practice AND publicly advocate vegetarianism. Christians and other Abrahamics (followers of the Abrahamic religions) should note this self-evident fact. Buddhism is ONLY six per cent (6%) of the global human population on earth today[66], which is surpassed by the more syncretistic "Chinese Universists" (which we may see expressed and manifested in North American and European Chinatowns.[67]


Writing and Publications[edit]

Maynard's writings (not specifically referenced here) are popular, vegan, and/or serious:

  • numerous book reviews (first reviews were in anthropology, religion, and social science geenerally; later, after a culinary career, he was invited to review vegan and vegetarian cookbooks and othervegetarian and vegan publications;
  • graduate thesis
  • talks on vegetarianism & veganism;
  • thousands of blog entries - one blog attracted over 160,000 readers;
  • documentation and training manuals for various businesses;
  • how-to-do-it articles on vegetarian organizing;
  • numerous vegetarian newsletters and editorial and commentary contributions
  • various other writings
  • about 200 Wikipedia articles (easy to find for Wikipedia editors); some of these have been for Harvard faculty and other academics; some are topical; a number related to topics of special interest and background (religion, philosophy, vegetarianism and veganism, organizations).

Wikipedia Status[edit]

Wikipedia Contributions
Maynard has started, maintained, improved, worked on, or tweaked ~200 accepted Wikipedia pages:
These ~200 accepted Wikipedia articles (plus some that have NOT been accepted) break down (approximately) as follows:

  • Primary Contributor - Started/Initiated or Maintained - 19+
  • Started/Initiated or Maintained - 22+
  • Significant Structural Improvements 25+
  • Worked On and made Significant Contributions - 25+
  • Tweaked - 75+
  • Minor Tweaks - 35+
  • Wikipedia articles developed but removed - at least 12

(note evident overlaps in categories)

Wikipedia Academic
In alphabetical order, some of these more academic articles are:

Vegetarian Interest Articles
In alphabetical order, some of these more substantial articles of vegetarian interest, which Maynard started and still maintains, are:

Frustrations
"Why don't they love us?"
Several of his articles (at least 9) have been rejected; most (not all) of those rejected articles dealt with vegetarian topics.

Those included articles on:

"Hey, these are historically formative!"
Rejected articles which did NOT deal with vegetarian topics include:

He has been a Wikipedian since early May 2007 and spends far TOO MUCH time on it. He attended the 2011 Wikipedia conference at Simmons College in Boston. Let's call that 'dedication'.

Badges[edit]

Registered editor badge with tildes.jpg This editor is a Registered Editor and is entitled to display this Service Badge.
Editor - silver ribbon - 2 pips.jpg This editor is a Yeoman Editor and is entitled to display this Service Badge.
Zeno of Citium.jpg
This user is interested in Stoicism.
Smiley.svg
This user just wanted to say...
"Have a nice day!"
Noia 64 apps karm.svg This user has been on Wikipedia for 7 years, 2 months and 3 days.
50 States flag.PNG This user has visited 48 of the 50 United States. 48
The Earth seen from Apollo 17.jpg This user hails from or lives on Earth.
H This user attends or attended Harvard University.
Flag of New England 1988.png This user resides in
New England
Open Access logo PLoS white.svg
This user is interested in open access to research literature.
incl This user is an inclusionist.
☺ This user is a member of the
Welcoming Committee.
TheThinker2.jpg This user enjoys philosophy.
Icon-gears2.svg This user believes in logic.
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg This user is of British ancestry.
Flag of Germany.svg This user is of German ancestry.
Noia 64 apps karm.svg This user has been on Wikipedia for 7 years, 2 months and 3 days.
Wikipedia-logo.png This user has been a member of Wikipedia since 2004.
Plato-raphael.jpg This user is interested in philosophy.
Haydn portrait by Thomas Hardy (small).jpg
This user enjoys music by
Joseph Haydn.
GClef.svgFClef.svg This user's favorite subject is Music.
Okrent's Law
This user believes that the pursuit of balance can create imbalance because sometimes something is true.
Open Access logo PLoS white.svg
This user is interested in open access to research literature.
Rod of asclepius.png This user is interested in medicine.
Women Science.png This user is a member of WikiProject Women scientists.
Beethoven.jpg
This user enjoys music by
Ludwig Van Beethoven.
Additive time signature.svg This user enjoys contemporary classical music.
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina.jpg
This user enjoys music by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina.
Claudio Monteverdi.jpg This user enjoys music by Claudio Monteverdi.
Lemming (1).jpg This user believes Groupthink is the most dangerous aspect of the human psyche. Who's with me?
Supply-demand-right-shift-demand.svg This user's favourite subject is Economics.
Vegetarian Adoption

Boards[edit]

PAST

  • Vegetarian Union of North America (VUNA) - Vice President, Regional Council Member
  • Boston Vegetarian Society, Boston Massachusetts - Founder in 1984 through early 21st century
  • New Hippocrates Health Institute, Medford, Massachusetts - mid-1980s-mid-1990s[78]

Unpaid (Volunteer) Commitments[edit]

PAST

  • 2012 Boston Greenfest, Boston Massachusetts - 2012 - Messaging (NOTE: resigned after becoming very critical of how the final product had been subverted by commercial interests inimical to long-term ecological sustainability, for petty commercial gain, often resulting in detriment to human health, also)
  • Massachusetts Cities of Cambridge, Somerville, Medford, and Malden (Recycling committees)
  • FARM = Farm Animal Reform Movement - National Education Coordinator, Great American Meatout annual outreach campaign
  • Green Committee, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • SERV - Somerville Environmental Recycling Volunteers
  • Steering Committee of Somerville MA Recycling Committee
  • TecsChange of Boston
  • Tutoring for the Salter School of Malden (2009-2011)
  • Vegetarian Union of North America (VUNA) - Vice President, Regional Council Member

Animal Rights Involvements[edit]

PAST

  • National Alliance for Animal Legislation

Vegetarian Involvements[edit]

[edit]

CURRENT:

PAST (incomplete list):

Ideas and Controversies[edit]


Maynard believes in and advocates an 'implied obligation' FOR ADVOCATES to help 'ramp up' the progression from abuse to nonabusive strategies, that aggressive efforts really MUST be organized with the best possible talents for understanding the nature of the oral AND scientific problems so that working scientists can on THEIR OWN (seemingly insensitive) TERMS appreciate the desirability of the long-term objective of achieving a full array of research objectives without the use of animal animals whatsoever. He admits that these complex challenges require the very best of dedicated minds and careers to realize the goals of abolition, and he seeks public funding of these efforts, the buy-in for which requires an extended educational effort which will enable the public to see the economically and scientifically sustainable character of such efforts.

Interests and Avocations[edit]

He loves classical music, hiking, backpacking, vegan whole foods cooking, vegetarian social events, getting to know previously unmet vegans,[83] and digital photography. He traveled to India in September 2006 for the IVU's 37th World Vegetarian Congress in Goa, after which he vege-toured three of India's many states: Goa, Karnataka, and Maharashtra (where Mumbai/Bombay is located).

He's hiked across the Great Divide a number of times and has traveled extensively throughout continental US. He recalls walking across the glaciers in Glacier National Park before anthropogenic climate disruption resulted in glacial melting.[84][85]

He's an aggressive blogger and social media advocate; he's lectured to vegetarian conferences on using these tools. His Facebook friends number over 4500, his LinkedIn contacts over 2468 (he invites LinkedIn invitations from persons of quality[86], character, and accomplishment[87][88][89][90]), and his blog readership passed a million early in 2009 and eventually exceeded 1.3 million.

Although he professes to be shy and introverted, he has friends in every one of the 206 nations and states on the planet, every state in the USA, and in every province of Canada.

Quips and Humor[edit]

Maynard has absolutely NO sense of humor. He'll tell you as much, but other folks seem to think quite differently about him. Strangers (usually well-educated women) have shown up (unannounced) telling him, "You're really very funny, you know?" Totally unexplained! Totally! What could he POSSIBLY have said (or thought) that gets so many chuckles and laughs from total strangers. The world is serious and demands focus and discipline, and humor is hardly what he's trying to achieve. Perhaps it's an "externality"!

To answer this question, one looks at readily remembered quips, such as:

  • Most "blondes" aren't ![91][92] [Most (not all) persons who APPEAR to be "blondes" are not really blondes; they have been artificially enhanced to appear as blondes. Look at the eyes and face; is that truly a real blonde?]
  • Vegan over half my natural life, longer than most human earthlings have been alive.
  • Anyone who holds a fundraiser in a nonvegetarian eatery does not need MY money.
  • It's much easier to recognize the personhood and moral significance of nonhuman persons if we're not habituated to eating them daily.
  • As an undergraduate, he described the 'search for God' phenomenologically, as the search for 'the highest person I am capable of knowing personally.' If anyone were to answer the question, "Is there a God?" with "I don't think there's a God", would that response imply that there is no God? No! Why is anyone taking a poll? Maybe it's qualitative research on public perception of ultimate reality. Truly, the issue is greater than an issue of human opinion. So, why are polls, surveys, and simple questions to "significant others" used to clarify one's own thinking rather than using a careful and systematic study of all the relevant issues that have bearing upon such a question? At the very least, that's a most speciesist way to explore a question. The inquiry is ontology, and a special kind of ontology, at that. Extremely bright, conscientious, relevantly-informed persons throughout the centuries and millennia have differed on this issue, yet some seem to think that being a conscientious person of faith is something to be treated with disdain. Perhaps they don't understand all the pertinent issues that are involved. Then, what do opinion surveys mean, given that samplings are seldom truly representative? And if they were or are representative, what would that data mean, in the broader picture, which is what that question urges us to search? ["Social prejudices" of the mind are found in academia and elsewhere.]
  • He 'reels' each time he's described as 'iconic' (usually in terms of his work promoting veganism and vegetarianism), without his becoming 'embattled and beleaguered' in the process.

These are pretty serious thoughts (with possible exception of the observation about erstwhile "blondes").

Judge for yourself. Maynard can often be seen having his photograph taken with cute young women on college campuses, where he is dressed up as a cuddly plush animal in an animal advocacy 'standout' with the Massachusetts Animal Rights Coalition (MARC), as part of MARC's "Barnyard Trio" on Commonwealth Avenue at Boston University or just outside Harvard Yard in Harvard Square, where he gets to wave (as a large, oversized plush animal at Harvard Faculty (and students) walking (or driving) by.

In college, then classmate and college newspaper reporter Cathy Pierson (known today publicly as Kate Pierson of the B-52s) quoted Maynard as saying,

  • "Only when we're completely alone can we communicate with others."

It's dubious that he had previously uttered that sentence. The burden of proof remains with the (named) college newspaper reporter (Cathy "Kate Pierson").

Perhaps 'there's more humor in a jugular vein.'[93][94]

Curiosities[edit]

External links[edit]

*

User Subpages[edit]

Current DRAFT ARTICLES (safer than putting them up as stub articles, which risks their 'speedy deletion')

Recently published ARTICLES (redirects)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holland, Colleen (2012, September 17). Why the Word “Vegan” is More Powerful Than Ever. VegNews, retrieved December 26, 2012.
  2. ^ In the earliest 20th century days of using the word vegan in England, the phrase 'vegetarianism proper' was also used to describe the consistent practice of dietary veganism. Several nuances of that word has been identified, but the concept of 'ethical veganism' can be further subdivided into underlying assumptions and sets of value systems that require the vegan dietary practice and determine the degree of economic involvements which overtly or tacitly support or endorse the exploitation of unconsenting nonhuman persons, and for many, the degree of public opposition to economic and political enslavement of nonhumans. These can be seen as markers in the journey to bookmark the clear positions of conscience in a confusing market-defined complex of entangelement with hinsa (hinsic entangelement).
  3. ^ Buddhist ethics
  4. ^ Ahimsa in Jainism
  5. ^ H. Jay Dinshah
  6. ^ The Philosophy Of Mediation In Heraclitus And Protagoras
  7. ^ Blattner, W. (2008) "What Heidegger and Dewey Could Learn from Each Other". Pages 57-77, in Philosophical Topics, Pragmatism, Volume 36, Issue 1, Spring 2008
  8. ^ Larry Wright, UC Riverside
  9. ^ English pronunciation: /koʊˈneɪtəs/;"conatus— Definitions from Dictionary.com". Dictionary.com. Lexico Publishing Group. Retrieved 2013-04-26. 
  10. ^ Latin for effort; endeavor; impulse, inclination, tendency; undertaking; striving) is an innate inclination of a thing to continue to exist and enhance itself
  11. ^ Traupman 1966, p. 52
  12. ^ Google search on the role of organic molecules in living systems
  13. ^ Name the four main groups of organic molecules in living things
  14. ^ Google search for "Irwin Edman" and "Philosopher's Quest"
  15. ^ "Vegetable" comes from the Latin vegetabilis (animated) and from vegetare (enliven), which is derived from vegetus (active), in reference to the process of a plant growing.
  16. ^ According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word "vegetable" was first recorded in English in the 15th century and originally applied to any plant. This is still the sense of the adjective "vegetable" in biological context.
  17. ^ In 1767, the meaning of the term "vegetable" was specified to mean "plant cultivated for food, edible herb, or root." It is believed that the year 1955 noted the very first use of the shortened, slang term "veggie".
  18. ^ As an adjective, the word vegetable is used in scientific and technical contexts with a different and much broader meaning, namely of "related to plants" in general, edible or not — as in vegetable matter, vegetable kingdom, vegetable origin, etc.
  19. ^ Swedenborg, Emanuel (2003). Swedenborg Concordance 1888. Kessinger Publishing. p. 502. ISBN 0-7661-3728-7.
  20. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2013-08-01.
  21. ^ At least four (4) broad definitions of fruits and vegetables are relevant to general discussions of produce:
    • Fruit (botany): the ovary of a flowering plant (sometimes including accessory structures),
    • Fruit (culinary): any edible part of a plant with a sweet flavor,
    • Vegetable (culinary): any edible part of a plant with a savory flavor.
    • Vegetable (legal): commodities that are taxed as vegetables in a particular jurisdiction
  22. ^ Google search for "theory of adequation"
  23. ^ Department Newsletter Fall 2006 - San Jose State University
  24. ^ 6.002x to be offered at up to 12 California State University campuses;The expanded collaboration between San Jose State University and edX follows a successful pilot that increased pass rates.
  25. ^ Rejecting edX, Amherst Doubts Benefits of MOOC Revolution, By Amna H. Hashmi, Crimson Staff Writer, Harvard Crimson, April 26, 2013
  26. ^ EdX To Seek New Revenue Models, by Amna H. Hashnu and Cynthia W. Shih, Contributing Writers, March 05, 2013
  27. ^ [1]
  28. ^ For Many California Students, Harvard Is Now Cheaper Than State Schools, March 6, 2012 at 12:00 AM
  29. ^ Preaching when parched: Gardner Taylor on desolate spirituality, "aridity," and the hope of home.
  30. ^ Internet FAQ Archives, Death Records, "Joseph Woodson"
  31. ^ Dr. Joseph R. Woodson, Baptist minister and clinical psychologist, was also the Senior Chaplain at Boston State Hospital
  32. ^ Asylum Projects wiki page for the Boston State Hospital
  33. ^ Specters of old state hospitals vanish as new uses take shape
  34. ^ Google search for photos of Boston State Hospital
  35. ^ Boston Redevelopment Authority's 1973 proposal for redevelopment of the Boston State Hospital,a.k.a. Mattapan State Hospital
  36. ^ The Lena New Boston development proposal, entitled "Olmsted Green," provides a creative mixed-use development plan offering housing, recreation, and economic development benefits, while respecting and preserving the natural open space characteristics of the site. Approximately 500 units of housing are to be built for sale and rental at various income levels, and include units for seniors and clients of the Department of Mental Health. Economic development opportunities are a fundamental aspect of the plan, with the establishment of agriculture and aquaculture businesses, a job-training center, and a recreational facility. "Heritage House" will commemorate and support efforts aiding people with mental illnesses.
  37. ^ Boston Natural Areas Network proposal for reclaiming BSH land for a nature preserve, including historic Clark/Cooper Community Garden and Boston Nature Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, with links to historic documents on the hospital and various site r-use proposals
  38. ^ Results of excavation activities on site after the hospital's closing
  39. ^ Reprint of 2006 NY Times article on Lena Park Community Development Corp.'s interest in redeveloping BSH parcel
  40. ^ All employees of state offices and institutions and services were required to take Federal loyalty oaths, as this 1971-1972 case of a terminated BSH employee, Ms. Lucretia Peteros Richardson, indicates
  41. ^ Nutrimmune Therapy: A Vegetarian Approach to Healing Nutrition and the Immune System, published through Sapphire Press
  42. ^ Concept cloud for Dr. Daniel I. Wikler of HSPH
  43. ^ The Google search for "newsletter editor" retrieves some excellent suggestions about and definitions of the job and also provides sources of further guidance, including books on the general topic.
  44. ^ Green Is the New Crimson at Harvard, by Kate Galbraith, New York Times, October 23, 2008, 9:00 am
  45. ^ Official web site, www.car-free.com
  46. ^ Boston Public Library electronic record.
  47. ^ Vegetarianism in Maynard's Life
  48. ^ Iacobbo, K, Iacobbo, M. (2004) Vegetarian America: A History. (page 180) His longtime friend, 'Saiom' Nellie Shriver, was mentioned for her public media outreach with vegetarian PSAs and how Maynard had heard a string of those PSAs on WEEI, which was then a local Boston news outlet, while at Harvard Divinity School. Maynard had been preparing for an Old Testament exam (a section on the minor prophets). He felt stirred to turn on his dorm room radio. He heard the American Vegetarians PSA, wrote down their 'PO Box 4333' address, and sent 'them' (her) a postcard asking 'for more information' (and received a generous 'care package' later on). Then, he resumed preparing for his grueling Old Testament exam at HDS. Within a few years, he developed the Vegetarian Hotline (late 70s, not 80s as the Iacobbos wrote), then the Boston Vegetarian Society (www.BostonVeg.org). The book continues to talk about how Shriver's missionary work 'made believers' out of lots of Americans.
  49. ^ Dr. T. Colin Campbell of Cornell University commented in Boston as early as winter 1991 (at Tufts that the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academies of Sciences had frequently debated whether dietary recommendations should be what the evidence tells us they should eat or what evidence tells us they will likely do if we tell them what we think they are likely to achieve in their daily individual diets. Should they recommend five fruits and vegetables each day, which the evidence then told them each American should eat, or one to two vegetables each day, since many Americans were avoiding vegetables altogether and would do well to eat at least one to two vegetables, and they would be very unlikely to adopt the evidence based dietary standard of 1991 of five fruits and vegetables per day because of unfamiliarity and taste.
  50. ^ http://www.ivu.org/veganfest/1995/
  51. ^ 8th International Vegan Festival, San Diego, CA
  52. ^ SERV's website
  53. ^ William L. Clement Library: Food Reform and Vegetarianism
  54. ^ Jed Dannenbaum, Drink and Disorder: Temperance Reform in Cincinnati from the Washingtonian Revival to the WCTU (1984)
  55. ^ Teach US History: Second Great Awakening and Reform
  56. ^ Jack S. Blocker, American Temperance Movements: Cycles of Reform (1989)
  57. ^ Jed Dannenbaum, Drink and Disorder: Temperance Reform in Cincinnati from the Washingtonian Revival to the WCTU (1984)
  58. ^ Kerr, Organized for Prohibition: A New History of the Anti-Saloon League (1985)
  59. ^ Vegetarian Resource Center webpage regathered by the Wayback Machine from August 15, 2000
  60. ^ The Peace Room there at UMB, housing some of The Peace Abbey's resources
  61. ^ List of VRC's first six Envirolink-hosted e-mail discussion lists
  62. ^ [This e-mail address - vrc@tiac.net - was closed around 2000 (TIAC - 'The Internet Access Company' - closed soon afterwards when it was sold to Earthlink), but it serves as a marker to identify print and online digital publishing concerning the work of the Vegetarian Resource Center]
  63. ^ Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3) | American Cancer Society
  64. ^ American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-3, By Charlie Hepp, April 22, 2013, Wauwatosa Now
  65. ^ Short summary of 'China' and 'Chinese' interests
  66. ^ Worldwide percentage of Adherents by Religion
  67. ^ Chinese universists are 'followers of a unique complex of beliefs and practices that may include: universism (yin/yang cosmology with dualities earth/heaven, evil/good, darkness/light), ancestor cult, Confucian ethics, divination, festivals, folk religion, goddess worship, household gods, local deities, mediums, metaphysics, monasteries, neo-Confucianism, popular religion, sacrifices, shamans, spirit writing, and Taoist and Buddhist elements.' (information source: World Christian Database)
  68. ^ Google search for Carl V. Phillips, MPP, PhD
  69. ^ Shankar Narayan
  70. ^ Campaign for Aging Research (C.A.R.)
  71. ^ Calorie Restriction
  72. ^ YouTube promotional video
  73. ^ C.A.R. on Facebook
  74. ^ Lifestyle Master program
  75. ^ Elder Helpers program
  76. ^ Idealist.org volunteer page for C.A.R.
  77. ^ YouTube promotional video for C.A.R.Registration information for the Campaign for Aging Research (C.A.R.)
  78. ^ Incorporation information for the New Hippocrates Health Institute and Health Center
  79. ^ Newspaper article by Jennifer Berkshire from The Boston Herald 9/14/2003 "Web inspires no-meat-and-greets" (in "Food" Section)
  80. ^ The Significance of BLIA's Four-Line Verse
  81. ^ Newspaper article by Jennifer Berkshire from The Boston Herald 9/14/2003 "Web inspires no-meat-and-greets" (in "Food" Section)
  82. ^ What's the Diference? Boston/Cambridge 'brain corridor'
  83. ^ getting 'out' socially in Boston
  84. ^ Glaciers in Glacier National Park
  85. ^ Geography and geology of Glacier National Park
  86. ^ Google search for compassionate intelligence quality
  87. ^ Selling Yourself Through Accomplishments
  88. ^ How to write a biography
  89. ^ Industry Experience vs. Lifetime Accomplishments
  90. ^ Google search for "significant accomplishment"
  91. ^ Maynard's 'blonde' v. blonde blog entry
  92. ^ Random blogger admits that most blondes' aren't really blondes at all.
  93. ^ History of Mad
  94. ^ Epinions: "Humor in a Jugular Vein: Mad Magazine" by George Chabot

Category:Living people