User:Number 57

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
About Me
♂
This user is male.
X This user is a member of Generation X.
Flag of England.svg This user lives in England Royal Arms of England (1198-1340).svg
This user has two academic degrees.
Man-and-woman-icon.svg This user is straight
but not narrow.
Emblem-cool.svg
Exquisite-Modem.png This user remembers using
a rotary dial telephone.
gk This user is a geek.
Babel
en This user is a native speaker of English.
he-2
משתמש זה מסוגל לתרום ברמה בינונית של עברית.‏
de-2 Dieser Benutzer hat fortgeschrittene Deutschkenntnisse.
fr-1 Cet utilisateur peut contribuer avec un niveau élémentaire de français.
Cyrl-2
Д
This user has an intermediate understanding of the Cyrillic script.
Arab-2
ع
This user has an intermediate understanding of the Arabic script.
man-
kind
Regarding gender, this user will use the vernacular, not what is politically correct.
“,;:’ This user is a punctuation stickler.
its & it’s This user understands the difference between its and it’s. So should you.
Wikipedia
Keesings This user has access to Keesing's World News Archives through The Wikipedia Library
Wikipedia ויקיפדיה
משתמש זה תורם לוויקיפדיה העברית

I support Hebrew language Wikipedia with my contributions.
Admin mop.PNG This user is an administrator on the English Wikipedia. (verify)
Nuvola apps important.svg This user page has been vandalized 20 times.
Unbalanced scales.svg This user strives to maintain a policy of neutrality on controversial issues.
Human.svg Wikipedia is not censored.
47-aspetti di vita quotidiana,ira,Taccuino Sanitatis, Casana.jpg This user absolutely hates redirects and has to fix any one he/she sees.
@ This user can be reached by email.
Flag of Israel.svg This user is a member of
WikiProject Israel
Paullusmagnus-logo.JPG This user spends WAY too much time on Wikipedia and really needs to get off the computer... after one more edit.
Beliefs
Parthenon icon.jpg This user is a committed advocate of democracy.
BRoy square.png This user is a monarchist.
Clock.tower.from.westminster.br.arp.750pix.jpg This user prefers parliamentary systems of government.
UserboxDeathStopV2.png This user believes that the death penalty should never be used.
Dome 1.jpg This user believes in the separation of church and state. ReligionSymbolAbr.PNG
HumanismSymbol.PNG This user is a secular humanist.
Universe expansion2.png This user believes that the universe began with a bang.
Lq-dna.png This user understands biological evolution.

' This user does not believe in Flying Spaghetti Monsterism, but agrees it is as likely as creationism.
Sunrise over the sea.jpg This user believes that the meaning of life is to live a happy life.
Green ribbon.svg This user has arranged for organ donation; have you?
Female.svgMale.svg This user supports gender equality.
This user opposes all forms of racism and admires Nelson Mandela. Nelson Mandela.jpg
Leaf 1 web.jpg This user is an environmentalist.
Urbine221dc.jpg This user supports the use of green energy.
Radiation warning symbol.svg This user supports the use of nuclear energy. Radiation warning symbol.svg
House mouse.jpg This user is interested in animal rights issues.
Organic-vegetable-cultivation.jpeg This user believes that Organic farming is a bad thing.
Recycle001.svg This user supports recycling.
25 railtransportation.svg This user supports public transit.
Small Flag of the United Nations ZP.svg This user supports the United Nations.
מרצ This user supports Meretz-Yachad.
C2H5OH-0 This user is a non-drinker.
No smoking symbol.svg
This user does not smoke.
"No smoking" sign with text This user supports the ban on smoking in public places.
Cannabis prohibited sign This user is drug-free.
Peace dove.gif This user is peaceful.
Flag of Israel.svgFlag of Palestine.svg
Flag of Jordan.svgFlag of Egypt.svg
This user believes in a multi-state solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict Druze star.svgChristian cross.svg
Flag of Lebanon.svgFlag of Syria.svg


Where I've been

EnglandCornwallWalesRepublic of IrelandFranceFlag of Brittany.svgJapanAustraliaTurkeySwitzerlandIsraelScotlandSyriaState of PalestineItalyCanadaQuebecUnited StatesBelgiumFlandersNetherlandsFrieslandMoroccoAustriaSloveniaCroatiaHungaryGermanyGreeceSpainSouth KoreaPolandCzech RepublicGibraltar

Obligatory lolcat picture.

My main contributions to Wikipedia are articles on elections and referendums (at some point I will also create associated articles on the parties that contested the elections), non-League football and Israeli politics (although this sphere is now largely complete at least in terms of the articles being started, and whilst I have many article on my watchlist, I rarely make any edits other than to revert vandalism or fix other edits).

Why I edit Wikipedia

The main reason I edit Wikipedia is a strong belief that every person on the planet has the right to access the accumulated knowledge of humanity. Giving people access to this knowledge allows them to make informed decisions – one only has to look at how desperate repressive countries like North Korea are to stop their citizens finding out the truth to see how important it is. The even sadder thing for me is that access to the facts in a neutral, reliable and trusted source is still needed in the "free" world. I can think of no better example than the recent referendum in my own country in which the ruling party and the majority of the mainstream media (which is supportive of it) colluded to run a campaign largely based on a lie.[1]

Many of the articles I write (particularly recently) are ones on which there is little online information, and are on topics that I feel are sufficiently important that the information should be available more widely (elections, for instance, are a key part of a nation's history). I should note my thanks to Wikimedia UK, who provided me with a grant to purchase Elections in Europe: A data handbook, from which I have written and improved several hundred articles.

And, of course, I edit Wikipedia because I am interested in the topics themselves, and enjoy the research and reading required to write the articles.

My contributions

At the last count (12 May 2014), I'd started 4,901 articles. These can be grouped into several categories:

Article type Articles Notes
Elections and referendums 2,721 Mostly complete, but some work to do on historical elections, particularly in former colonies.
Football 246 Completed all clubs to have played in top division in Israel and in the Eastern Counties League, plus other articles on non-league football clubs, seasons or players to have played for Sudbury Town/AFC Sudbury
Israeli places 569 Completed set of articles on all registered towns/villages/regional councils in Israel, plus a few settlements
Israeli politics 621 Completed sets of articles on all members of the Knesset, ministers, governments and signatories of the declaration of independence
Israeli society 50 Random articles on things like G. Yafit, Hitahdut HaIkarim and basketball clubs.
Other politics 12 Random articles on politicians like Aleqa Hammond
Other 8 Totally random stuff
Places in Suffolk 130 Completed the set of articles on civil parishes in Suffolk
Political parties 525 Trying to create articles on every political party to have won a seat in a national legislature

Did you know

A few articles I created (or in one or two cases, merely contributed to) have been selected for DYK:

  1. ... that Pinchas Rosen, Israel's first Minister of Justice, served in the German army during World War I?
  2. ... that the Alignment is the only political party in Israel ever to have held a majority of seats in the Knesset?
  3. ... that Bechor-Shalom Sheetrit was the only signatory of the Israeli declaration of independence to have been born in the Land of Israel?
  4. ... that the 1951 Gold Coast legislative election was the first to be held in Africa under universal suffrage?
  5. ... that the 1967 general election in Sierra Leone saw the first defeat of a ruling party in an election held under universal suffrage in sub-Saharan Africa?
  6. ... that the Bedouin villagers of al-Sayyid developed their own form of sign language in response to the high rate of deafness amongst their tribe?
  7. ... that the 1966-68 Liga Leumit season was played over two years in an effort to rid Israeli football of corruption and violence, which included riots on the field?
  8. ... that Mishmar David was the first kibbutz to be privatised?
  9. ... that Hapoel Tayibe was the first ever Arab football club to play in the top division in Israel?
  10. ... that Hussniya Jabara was the first Israeli Arab woman to be elected to the Knesset?
  11. ... that Gershom Schocken was the editor of Haaretz for over 50 years?
  12. ... that Abd el-Aziz el-Zoubi was the first non-Jewish member of an Israeli government?
  13. ... that Shmuel Flatto-Sharon successfully ran for election to the Knesset to avoid extradition to France, where he was wanted for embezzlement?
  14. ... that Shmuel Rechtman was the first member of the Knesset to be sent to prison?
  15. ... that Israeli politician and settlement activist Gershon Shafat spent ten months as a Jordanian prisoner of war?
  16. ... that at just 85 days in office, the sixteenth government of Israel was the shortest-lived in the country's history?
  17. ... that the twenty-ninth government of Israel was the first to have a non-Jewish minister?
  18. ... that Edward Francis Small was the first Gambian to be elected to the country's legislative council?
  19. ... that voter turnout for the 2001 judicial reform referendum in Botswana was just 4.9%?
  20. ... that the 1957 election in Zanzibar was the first election to be held in East Africa?
  21. ... that in the 1970 presidential election in DR Congo, Joseph Mobuto received more votes than the number of registered voters?
  22. ... that Guinea was the only French colony to reject the 1958 constititution in a referendum, thereby opting for independence?
  23. ... that the 1927 presidential election in Liberia made it into the Guinness Book of Records as the most fraudulent ever?
  24. ... that following a referendum in 1984, Liechtenstein became the last country in Europe to grant women the right to vote?
  25. ... that it took a replay and then eighty minutes of extra time for Brighton & Hove Albion reserves to win the 1920–21 Southern League title?
  26. ... that the 2002 Costa Rican presidential election was the first in the country's history to go to a second round?
  27. ... that by making her debut in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup at the age of 16, Cecilia Santiago became the youngest-ever goalkeeper to appear in a World Cup?
  28. ... that Japanese international footballer Aya Sameshima worked at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants prior to the disaster there?
  29. ... that Eynesbury Rovers are the most westerly football club ever to play in the Eastern Counties League?
  30. ... that following opposition calls for a boycott, voter turnout in the 1983 general elections in Jamaica was just 2.7%?
  31. ... that the electoral system for the 1883 elections in Egypt was said to have been based on the design of a pyramid?
  32. ... that the 2011 Micronesian parliamentary elections were the first to feature female candidates?
  33. ... that Pike's Lane was the venue of the first-ever goal scored in league football?

Problems with Wikipedia

Despite my beliefs about Wikipedia's role in providing neutral and reliable information, there are several areas that concern me. Due to a lack of will by admins early in Wikipedia's history, the issue of nationalist editors has never really been dealt with. There are several areas of the project which are almost no-go areas for outside/neutral editors, and many false consensuses have been built up by small groups of editors (usually around five people, which is sufficient to block progress on any attempt at outside involvement (the fatal flaw of the WP:RFC process being that it is not limited to outside editors). The areas I have come across which are particularly problematic are:

  • Estonia - attempts to revise history by denying the fact that Estonia was part of the Russian Empire or USSR. This usually manifests itself in insisting that country of birth is listed as Estonia in years when the country was not independent.
  • Ireland/Northern Ireland - a key example being the de facto banning of the phrase "Northern Irish" to describe people from Northern Ireland and (similar to the Estonia situation) the refusal to accept that Ireland was part of the UK prior to 1921. As well as the issue over birth places, one particularly stupid example I came across whilst working on election articles was Irish general election, 1918 - an election to the UK parliament that convention dictates should be United Kingdom general election, 1918 (Ireland). Unsurprisingly, a requested move was blocked more than once.
  • Israel/Palestine - several years ago the major problem was Israeli bias (refusal to acknowledge that settlements were considered illegal by international law etc), but the pendulum has swung the other way in recent years. Major problems include the refusal to even allow the phrase "Israeli Arabs" in the introduction of the article about those people (despite it being the common name - and those editors that call for the use of the "neutral" phrase "Arab citizens of Israel" are now attempting to sneak "Palestinian Arabs" into articles instead) and attempts to replace "Palestinian Territories" with "Palestine" despite the state not yet existing.

Whilst I have given up on these issues being resolved, the problem still bothers me.

Barnstars

Notes

  1. ^ The Conservative Party claimed that changing the voting system to the run-off voting would cost the taxpayer £250 million, and this was the primary campaigning tool for use on posters and was repeated almost unquestioned by all Conservative-supporting newspapers (which made up the vast majority of the printed press at the time). However, this figure included the £80m cost of the referendum (which was being held anyway) and £130m for electronic voting machines that would be required to introduce it. This was clearly a lie as Australia uses the same voting system but processes votes manually.