User:Swtpc6800/Citations

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Citations and References[edit]

Used in Amazing Stories[edit]

  • "Advertising News and Notes". New York Times. January 18 1938. p. 28.  Check date values in: |date= (help) "Ziff-Davis Publishing Company, New York and Chicago, has purchased Radio News Magazine and Amazing Stories."
  • Carlson, Walter (June 23 1965). "Advertising: Death and Taxes and Insurance". New York Times. p. 62.  Check date values in: |date= (help)"[P]urchase by the Ultimate Publishing Company, Inc., of two science-fiction magazines from Ziff-Davis Publishing Company. [Amazing Stories and Fantastic.] … according to Sol Cohen, president of Ultimate."

Used in Altair 8800[edit]

  • US patent 3800129, Richard H. Umstattd, "MOS Desk Calculator", issued 1974-03-26  The Electronic Arrays, Inc. calculator chip set that was used in the MITS 816 calculator.
  • Ed Roberts (November 1971). "Electronic desk calculator you can build". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 35 (5): 27–32. 
  • Kellahin, James R. (July 1973). "The 1440: A calculator with memory, square root and other new features". Radio-Electronics (Gernsback Publication) 44 (7): 55–57.  The cover story is for the MITS 1700 waveform generator. An ad for the MITS 1200, a $99 battery operated handheld calculator, is on page 15.
  • Greelish, David (1996). "Ed Roberts Interview with Historically Brewed magazine". Historically Brewed (Historical Computer Society) (9). Retrieved 2007-11-22.  Ed Roberts said: "We had a Nova 2 by Data General in the office that we sold time share on …The front panel on an Altair essentially models every switch that was on the Nova 2. We had that machine to look at. The switches are pretty much standard of any front panel machine. It would have taken forever if we would have had to re-decide where every switch had to go. "
  • Young, Jeffrey S. (1998). Forbes Greatest Technology Stories: Inspiring Tales of the Entrepreneurs. New York: John Wiley & Sons. pp. pg 153. ISBN 0471243744.  "By 1973, M ITS had more than 100 employees, working in two shifts, churning out digital calculators as fast as they could."
  • Mims, Forrest M (1986). Siliconnections: Coming of Age in the Electronic Era. New York: McGraw-Hill. pp. pg 40. ISBN 9780070424111.  "By November 1973 MITS had 51 employees, 25 of whom worked full time."

Used in Altair BASIC[edit]

  • Freiberger, Paul; Michael Swaine (2000). Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 53. ISBN 0-07-135892-7.  "While walking through Harvard Square one day, Allen spotted the Popular Electronics cover that features the Altair. … Allen ran to tell Bill that he thought their big break had finally come. Bill agreed."
  • Wallace, James; Jim Erickson (1992). Hard Drive: Bill Gates and the Making of the Microsoft Empire. John Wiley & Sons. pp. pg 81–83. ISBN 0-471-56886-4.  "Harvard officials had found out that he (Gates) and Allen had been making extensive use of the university's PDP-10 to develop a commercial product. The officials were not pleased." The computer was funded by the Department of Defense and was under the control of Professor Thomas Cheatham. "Although DARPA was funding the PDP-10 at Harvard, there was no written policy regarding its use."
  • "We have a BASIC". New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Retrieved 2007-04-18. 
  • Wallace, James; Jim Erickson (1992). Hard Drive: Bill Gates and the Making of the Microsoft Empire. John Wiley & Sons. pp. pg 78. ISBN 0-471-56886-4. 

Used in Binary_prefix#History[edit]

  • Sonquiest, John A. (December 1962). "Fixed-word-length arrays in variable-word-length computers". Communications of the ACM (ACM Press) 5 (12): pg 602. "The following scheme for assigning storage for fixed-word-length arrays seems to meet these criteria and has been used successfully in working with linear arrays on a 4k IBM 1401." 
  • Gruenberger, Fred (October 1960). "Letters to the Editor". Communications of the ACM 3 (10).  "The 8K core stores were getting fairly common in this country in 1954. The 32K store started mass production in 1956; it is the standard now for large machines and at least 200 machines of the size (or its equivalent in the character addressable machines) are in existence today (and at least 100 were in existence in mid-1959)." Note: The IBM 1401 was a character addressable computer.
  • Lin, Yeong; Mattson, Richard (September 1972). "Cost-performance evaluation of memory hierarchies". Magnetics, IEEE Transactions on (IEEE) 8 (3): pg 390–392. "Also, random access devices are advantageous over serial access devices for backing store applications only when the memory capacity is less than 1 Mbyte. For capacities of 4 Mbyte and 16 Mbyte serial access stores with shift register lengths of 256 bit and 1024 bit, respectively, look favorable." 
  • IBM (1972). "System/370 Model 158 brochure". IBM. "All-monolithic storage ... (1024-bit NMOS) This new improvement of processor storage makes system expansion more economical. Real storage capacity is available in 512K increments ranging from 512K to 2,048K bytes." 

Used in Binary_prefix#Floppy_drives[edit]

  • IBM (May 1982). Disk Operating System by Microsoft (Version 1.1). IBM Corporation. pp. G–1.  Some software applications "used with DOS 1.10, will operate with either two 160KB drives or two 320KB drives. Both drives MUST be of the same type…"
  • IBM (January 1983). Disk Operating System by Microsoft (Version 2.0). IBM Corporation. pp. A–2.  "Beginning with DOS Version 2.00, DOS formats diskettes at 9 sectors per track, which increases capacity from 163,840 to 184,320 characters of information for single-sided diskettes and from 327,680 to 368,640 characters for dual-sided diskettes. The smaller capacity diskettes created by DOS Version 1.00 or DOS Version 1.10 (8 sectors per track) are also usable with DOS Version 2.00."
  • Apple Inc. (August 22, 1991). "Double-Density Versus High-Density Disks". Article ID: 3802. Apple Inc. Retrieved 2007-07-07.  "This article gives the specifications for the 800K floppy disks and the1.4MB floppy disks." 800K Disk has 1600 sectors and 1.4MB Disk has 2880 sectors. A sector is 512 bytes.
  • Microsoft (May 6, 2003). "Determining Actual Disk Size: Why 1.44 MB Should Be 1.40 MB". Article ID: 121839. Microsoft. Retrieved 2007-07-07.  "The 1.44-megabyte (MB) value associated with the 3.5-inch disk format does not represent the actual size or free space of these disks. Although its size has been popularly called 1.44 MB, the correct size is actually 1.40 MB."

Binary Prefix Misc[edit]

  • Habib, Stanley (October 1973). "Notes from industry". ACM SIGMICRO Newsletter (ACM Press) 4 (3): pg 29. "OCEANPORT, N.J., SEPT. 25, 1973 -- A 16-bit minicomputer priced at under $2,000.00 in quantities and a 32-bit minicomputer priced at under $6,000.00 in quantities were introduced today by Interdata, Inc. The 16-bit mini, the Model 7/16, includes an 8KB memory unit in its basic configuration, and will be available for delivery in the first quarter of 1974. The single unit price of the 7/16 is $3,200.00. The 32-bit mini, the Model 7/32, includes a 32KB memory unit and will be available for delivery in the second quarter of 1974. The single unit price of the 7/32 is $9,950.00." 
  • Real, P. (September 1959). "A generalized analysis of variance program utilizing binary logic.". ACM '59: Preprints of papers presented at the 14th national meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM Press): pg 78–1 – 78–5. doi:10.1145/612201.612294. "On a 32k core size 704 computer, approximately 28,000 datum may be analyzed, … without resorting to auxiliary tape storage."  The author is with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.
Editor:
The fact that 210 and 103 are almost but not quite equal creates a lot of trivial confusion in the computing world and around its periphery. One hears, for example, of doubling the size of a 32K memory and getting 65K (not 64K) memories. Doubling again yields a 131K (not 130K) memory. People who use powers of two all the time know that these are approximations to a number they could compute exactly if they wanted to, but they seldom tale the trouble. In conversions with outsiders, much time is wasted explaining that we really can do simple arithmetic and we didn't mean exactly what we said.
The confusion arises because we use K, which traditionally means 1000, as an approximation for 1024. If we had a handy name for 1024, we wouldn’t have to approximate. I suggest that κ (kappa) be used for this purpose. Thus a 32κ memory means one of exactly 32,768 words. Doubling it produces a 64κ memory which is exactly 65,536 words. As memories get larger and go into the millions of words, one can speak of a 32κ2(33,554,432-word) memory and doubling it will yield a 64κ2 (67,108,864-word) memory. Users of the language will need to have at there fingertips only the first nine powers of 2 and will not need to explain the discrepancies between what they said and what they meant.
Donald R. Morrison
Computer Science, Division 5256
Sandia Corporation, Sandia Base
Albuquerque, N, Mex.

Used in Byte (magazine)[edit]

  • Green, Wayne (August 1975). "73 Staff". 73 Amateur Radio (179): 2. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 

Used in Commodore PET[edit]

  • What's New (February 1978). "Commodore Ships First PET Computers". BYTE (Byte Publications) 3 (2): 190.  Commodore press release. "The PET computer made its debut recently as the first 100 units were shipped to waiting customers in mid October 1977."
  • Bagnall, Brian (2006). On The Edge - The Spectacular Rise and Fall of Commodore. Winnipeg, Manitoba: Variant Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-9738649-0-7.  1977 Consumer Electronics Show

Used in Coppertone girl[edit]

  • NYT Staff (May 18, 2006), Joyce B. Brand, Commercial Artist, Dies at 88, New York Times  The original artist, Joyce Ballantyne Brand, created this iconic image using her daughter Claire Blackburn as the model.

Used in Copyleft[edit]

  • Wang, Li-Chen (May 1976). "Palo Alto Tiny BASIC". Dr. Dobb's Journal of Computer Calisthenics & Orthodontia, Running Light Without Overbyte. 1 (5): 12–25.  Source code begins with the following six lines. "TINY BASIC FOR INTEL 8080; VERSION 1.0; BY LI-CHEN WANG; 10 JUNE, 1976; @COPYLEFT; ALL WRONGS RESERVED" The June date in the May issue is correct. The magazine was behind schedule, the June and July issues were combined to catch up.
  • Rauskolb, Roger (December 1976). "Dr. Wang's Palo Alto Tiny BASIC". Interface Age 2 (1): 92–108.  Source code begins with the following nine lines. TINY BASIC FOR INTEL 8080; VERSION 2.0; BY LI-CHEN WANG; MODIFIED AND TRANSLATED TO INTEL MNEMONICS; BY ROGER RAUSKOLB; 10 OCTOBER, 1976 ; @COPYLEFT; ALL WRONGS RESERVED

Used in Datapoint 2200 and Datapoint[edit]

  • Thompson Kaye, Glynnis (1984). A Revolution in Progress - A History to Date of Intel. Intel Corporation. pp. pg 13. Order number:231295.  "The 8-bit 8008 microprocessor had been developed in tandem with the 4004 and was introduced in April 1972. It was originally intended to be a custom chip for Computer Terminals Corp. of Texas, later to be known as Datapoint." "As it developed, CTC rejected the 8008 because it was too slow for the company's purpose and required too many supporting chips."

Used in Ed Roberts (computers)[edit]

  • "Ed Roberts". New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Retrieved 2007-07-05. 
  • Forrest Mims; Henry E. Roberts (November 1970). "Assemble an LED Communicator - The Opticom". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 33 (5): 45–50. 
  • Ed Roberts (November 1971). "Electronic desk calculator you can build". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 35 (5): 27–32. 
  • H. Edward Roberts; William Yates (January 1975). "Altair 8800 minicomputer". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 7 (1): 33–38. 
  • H. Edward Roberts; Paul Van Baalen (November 1975). "First Motorola/AMI "6800" MPU computer project". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 8 (5): 33–36. 

Used in Electronics Illustrated[edit]

  • Dougherty, Philip H. (August 3, 1972), Fawcett Folds Magazine, New York Times: 52 
  • Dougherty, Philip (October 2, 1987). "Advertising: Diamandis Group at the Helm". New York Times. pp. D14. 
  • Fabrikant, Geraldine (April 14, 1988). "Hachette to Buy Magazine Publisher". New York Times. pp. D1. 

Used in Experimenter Publishing bankruptcy [edit]

  • "Radio News Publisher In Hands Of Receiver". New York Times. February 21, 1929. p. 36. 
  • "Business Records, Bankruptcy Proceedings". New York Times. March 12 1929. p. 53.  Check date values in: |date= (help) "Experimenter Publishing Co., Inc., 230 Fifth Avenue. - Liabilities approximately $500,000, assets not stated. Principal creditors listed are Art Color Printing Co., Dunellen, N.J., $152,908; Bulkley Dunton Co., $154,406; Walter Braunstein, $10,258; Edward Langer Printing Co., Hollis L.I., $14,614; S. Gernsback, $8, 450; Spencer Wynne Paper Products, Newburgh, N.Y., $9,249; Sieldinger Press, $8,719; Service Photo Co., $6,227."
  • Kennedy, T. R. (April 1958). "From Coherer to Spacistor". Radio Electronics (Gernsback Publications) 29 (4): pp. 44–59. 
  • "Bid For Magazines In Receivership". New York Times. 1929-03-29. p. 13. 
  • "To Pay 95% Of Debts In $600,000 Failure". New York Times. 1929-04-04. p. 22. 
  • "Gernsbacks Deny Diverting Assets". New York Times. 1929-04-18. p. 13. 
  • Shunamen, Fred (October 1979). "50 Years of Electronics". Radio Electronics (Gernsback Publications) 50 (10): pp. 42–69. 
  • Stashower, Daniel (August 1990). "A Dreamer Who Made Us Fall in Love with the Future". Smithsonian 21 (5): pp. 44–55. 

Used in Forrest Mims[edit]

  • Mims, Forrest (November 1970). "Light-emitting Diodes". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 33 (5): 35–43. 
  • Mims, Forrest; Henry E Roberts (November 1970). "Assemble an LED Communicator - The Opticom". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 33 (5): 45–50, 98–99. 
  • Mims, Forrest (January 1985). "The Tenth Anniversary of the Altair 8800". Computers & Electronics (Ziff Davis) 23 (1): 58–62, 81–82. 

Used in Halt and Catch Fire[edit]

  • Wheeler, Gerry (December 1977). "Undocumented M6800 Instructions". BYTE 2 (12): 46–47. 

Used in IBM Personal Computer[edit]

  • IBM (July 1982). Technical Reference: Personal Computer Hardware Reference Library (Revised Edition ed.). IBM Corp. pp. page 2–93. 6025008.  The drives are soft sectored, single or double sided, with 40 tracks per side. They are Modified Frequency Modulation (MFM) coded in 512 byte sectors, giving a formatted capacity of 163,840 bytes per drive for single sided and 327,680 bytes per drive for double sided.

Used in IMSAI 8080[edit]

  • IMS Associates, Inc. (October 1975). "IMASI and Altair Owners". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 8 (4): 110.  Advertisement: IMSAI 8080 computer with 1K of RAM. $439 kit, $621 assembled.
  • Littman, Jonathan (1987"). Once Upon a Time in ComputerLand: The Amazing, Billion-Dollar Tale of Bill Millard. Los Angeles: Price Stern Sloan. pp. pg18. ISBN 0-89586-502-5.  Check date values in: |date= (help) "Later that day, December 16 [1975], United Parcel Service picked up the first shipment of 50 IMS computer kits for delivery to customers."

Used in Indian Head test card[edit]

  • Kay, M. S. (January 1949). "The Television Test Pattern". Radio & Television News (Ziff-Davis) 41 (1): pp 38–39, 135–136.  "Every television station, prior to it's actual broadcasting period, transmits a test pattern for the purpose of permitting set owners to adjust their receiver controls for optimum reception." The article also states that television programming (in 1949) was only a few hours each evening. The "Indian Head" test pattern was built into the RCA "Monoscope" tube, a 2F21, which acted as a complete replacement for the TV camera.

Used in John Fred[edit]

  • Bronson, Fred (2003). The Billboard Book of Number 1 Hits. Billboard Books. p. 235. ISBN 0823076776.  "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" Number 1, January 1968.

Used in Kansas City standard[edit]

  • Virginia Peschke (February 1976). "BYTE's Audio Cassette Standards Symposium". BYTE (BYTE Publications) 1 (6): 72–73. 
  • Don Lancaster (March 1976). "Build the Bit Boffer". BYTE (BYTE Publications) 1 (7): 30–39. 
  • Harold A. Mauch (March 1976). "Digital Data on Cassette Recorders". BYTE (BYTE Publications) 1 (7): 40–45. 
  • Robert S. Jones (May 1977). "The Floppy-ROM Experiment". Interface Age (McPheters, Wolfe & Jones) 2 (6): 28, 83. 
  • William W. Turner (May 1977). "Robert Uiterwyk's 4K BASIC". Interface Age (McPheters, Wolfe & Jones) 2 (6): 40–54. 
  • William Blomgren (May 1977). "Platter BASIC: The Search for a Good, Random Access, Record Cutting Juke Box". Interface Age (McPheters, Wolfe & Jones) 2 (6): 29–36. 
  • Gary Kay (December 1976). "The Designer's Eye View of the AC-30". BYTE (BYTE Publications) 1 (16): 98–108. 

Mark 8 Newsletter[edit]

  • Freiberger, Paul; Michael Swaine (2000). Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 220. ISBN 0-07-135892-7.  "Hal Singer and John Craig started the Mark 8 Newsletter to provide information for fellow users to the Mark 8."

Used in Model Rocketry (magazine)[edit]

  • Ceruzzi, Paul E. (2003). A History of Modern Computing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. pp. 227–233. ISBN 0-262-53203-4. 

Used in MOS Technology 6502[edit]

  • James (September 1975). "James Advertisement". Popular Electronics 8 (3): pg 107.  James is now Jameco Electronics. The 8080 CPU was $149.95, the 8008 CPU was 29.95. A 2102 1K bit static RAM was $4.95. Their price for a 8080A CPU was 37.95 in the June 1976 issue.
  • Digi-Key (December 1975). "Digi-Key Advertisement". Popular Electronics 8 (6): pg 124.  The 8080A CPU was $69.50. A 2102 1K bit static RAM was $3.50. Digi-Key's price for a 8080A was $34.95 in the June 1976 issue.
  • Fylstra, Daniel (November 1975). "Son of Motorola (or the $20 CPU Chip)". BYTE (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 1 (3): 56–62.  A comparison of the Motorola M6800 and the MOS Technology MCS6501/MCS6502 microprocessors. It was written in August 1975, about a month before the 6500 family was introduced at the WESCON trade show in San Francisco CA., (September 16-19, 1975)

Used in Motorola 6800[edit]

  • Motorola (1976), Motorola Annual Report 1975, p. 13  "We introduced our M6800 microprocessor system late in 1974 and it gained broad industry acceptance in 1975."

Used in North Star Computers[edit]

  • Greenberg, Mark; Charles Grant (February 1977). "Kentucky Fried Computers advertisement". BYTE 2 (2): pg 103.  Slogan: "A Computer in Every Pot" Address was 2465 Fourth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710
  • Reiling, Robert (June 1976). "Bulletin Board". Homebrew Computer Club Newsletter 2 (6): pg 2. Retrieved 2007-07-21.  Kentucky Fried Computers, a new retail computer kit business in Berkeley makes this offer: All IMSAI products (except some peripherals) will be sold at 10% off to Homebrew Computer Club members. Add 2% if shipping is desired (excess is refunded). Orders may be picked up in Berkeley by appointment only. If there is sufficient volume from Homebrew members, we will arrange free delivery for distribution at Homebrew meetings. California residents must add 6% sales tax. The discount offer expires July 31, 1976. Terms: cash. Kentucky Fried Computers is operated by Mark Greenberg and Charles Grant. They plan to open a store later this year, but for now they are selling on a mail and telephone order basis. Contact them at Applied Computer Technology, 1038 Merced, Berkeley, Ca. 94707; telephone (415) 527-6760.

Used in One Week (film)[edit]

  • The Screen, New York Times, October 25, 1920: 22  The New York Times movie review said, "One Week, a Buster Keaton work, has more fun in it than most slap-stick, trick-property comedies."

Used in Open Letter to Hobbyists[edit]

  • Mames, Stephen; Paul Andrews (1994). Gates: How Microsoft's Mogul Reinvented an Industry and Made Himself the Richest Man in America. Touchstone, Simon and Schuster. pp. pg 91. ISBN 0-671-88074-8.  Chapter 7 "Thieves in our Midst!"
  • Gates, Bill (Feb 10, 1976). "An Open Letter To Hobbyists". Micro-8 Computer User Group Newsletter (Lompoc, CA: Cabrillo Computer Center) 2 (2): 1. 
  • Gates, Bill (March 11, 1976). "An Open Letter to Hobbyists". Minicomputer News (Boston MA: Benwill Publishing). 
  • Gates, Bill (March-April 1976). "An Open Letter To Hobbyists". People's Computer Company (Menlo Park, CA: People's Computer Company) 4 (5).  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  • Gates, Bill (May 1976). "Computer Hobbyists". Radio-Electronics (New York NY: Gernsback Publications) 47 (5): 14,16. Retrieved 2007-11-25. 
  • Warren, Jim C. (July 1976). "Correspondence". SIGPLAN Notices (ACM) 11 (7): 1.  Jim Warren, the editor of Dr. Dobbs Journal, describes how the Tiny BASIC project is an alternative to hobbyist "ripping off" software.
  • Singer, Harold L. (March 28, 1976). "An Open Letter to Ed Roberts". Micro-8 Computer User Group Newsletter (Lompoc, CA: Cabrillo Computer Center) 2 (4): 1. 
  • Wada, Robert (July 1976). "An Opinion on Software Marketing". BYTE (Peterborough, NH: BYTE Publications) 1 (11): 90,91. 

Used in PAiA Electronics [edit]

  • Simonton, John (May 1968). "Cyclops Intruder Detector". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 28 (5): 41–44. 

Used in Popular Electronics[edit]

  • The early issues listed the circulation figure on the Contents page. Starting in 1962 this data was in the back of each years January issue. The circulation was around 400,000 until 1985.
  • "We have a BASIC". New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Retrieved 2007-04-18. 
  • Raymond F. Yates (February 1943). "Popular Electronics, Part 1". Radio-Craft (Radcraft Publications) 14 (5): 266–268, 316–317. 
  • Art Salsberg (November 1982). "Editorial: Number One!". Computers & Electronics (Ziff Davis) 20 (11): 4.  "A survey of subscribers conducted last year confirmed again that the great majority of our readers are male (97%)..."
  • Barnes, Bill (November 19, 1972), Do-It Yourselfers Propel Kit Maker to High Levels, San Antonio Express-News: Business Section, page 10  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  • Forrest Mims; Henry E. Roberts (November 1970). "Assemble an LED Communicator - The Opticom". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 33 (5): 45–50, 98–99. 
  • Lou Garner (August 1972). "State of Solid State". Radio Electronics (Gernsback Publications) 43 (8): 23–25. 
  • H. Edward Roberts; William Yates (January 1975). "Altair 8800 minicomputer". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 7 (1): 33–38. 
  • Terry Walker; Roger Melen, Harry Garland (February 1975). "Build Cyclops, First All Solid-State TV Camera". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 7 (2): 27–31. 
  • Terry Walker; Roger Melen, Harry Garland, Ed Hall (February 1976). "Build the TV Dazzler". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 9 (2): 31, 37–40. 
  • Lee Felsenstein (March 1976). "Build the Pennywhistle - The Hobbyist's Modem". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 9 (3): 43–50. 
  • Robert M. Marsh; Lee Felsenstein (July 1976). "Build SOL, An Intellignet Computer Terminal". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 10 (1): 35–38. 
  • Art Salsberg (October 1984). "A Warm Welcome". Modern Electronics (Modern Electronics Inc.) 1 (1): 4. 

Used in Programmable Array Logic[edit]

  • "Monolithic Memories announces: a revolution in logic design". Electronic Design (Rochelle, NJ: Hayden Publishing) 26 (6): 148B, 148C. March 18, 1978.  Introductory advertisement on PAL (Programmable Array Logic).
  • Birkner, John (August 16, 1978). "Reduce random-logic complexity". Electronic Design (Rochelle, NJ) 26 (17): 98–105.  Text " Hayden Publishing " ignored (help)

Used in Programmable logic device[edit]

"Semiconductors and IC's : FPLA". EDN (Boston, MA: Cahners Publishing) 20 (13): 66. July 20, 1975.  Press release on Intersil IM5200 field programmable logic array. Fourteen inputs pins and 48 product terms. Avalanched-induced-migration programming. Unit price was $37.50

"FPLA's give quick custom logic". EDN (Boston, MA: Cahners Publishing) 20 (13): 61. July 20, 1975.  Press release on Signetics 82S100 and 82S101 field programmable logic arrays. Fourteen inputs pins, 8 output pins and 48 product terms. NiCr fuse link programming.

Used in Radio News[edit]

  • "Advertising News and Notes". New York Times. January 18 1938. p. 28.  Check date values in: |date= (help) Ziff-Davis Publishing Company, New York and Chicago, has purchased Radio News Magazine and Amazing Stories.
  • "Advertising News and Notes". New York Times. June 14 1938. p. 28.  Check date values in: |date= (help) Ziff-Davis Publishing Company, publisher of Radio News, has bought All Wave Radio and will combine the two publications with the August issue.
  • "Advertising: 2 Big Agencies Study a Merger". New York Times (New York Times). August 14, 1957. p. 34.  "The acquisition of Mercury Publications, Inc., and the Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine has been disclosed by Bernard G. Davis. He had resigned last month as president of the Ziff-Davis Publishing Company. Control of the Corporation was purchased from Joseph W. Furman."
  • Snitzer, Milton. (Jan 1972). "Popular Electronics - Including Electronics World". Popular Electronics (Ziff-Davis Publications) 1 (1): 16. 

Used in Streamline Cars Ltd[edit]

  • Gernsback, Hugo (November 1931). "Streamline Car Carries Engine at Rear". Everyday Science and Mechanics (Gernsback Publication): pg 663.  Shows cut-away view of car.
  • Special Cable to New York Times (January 4, 1932), Burney Will Display His Latest Auto Here, New York Times: Automobiles pg 1 "Inventor and Streamlined Car With Rear Engine Will Sail From England Tomorrow." This will be the ninth one built; the Prince of Wales bought the fifth one.
  • Spearing, James O. (October 5, 1930), At the Wheel, New York Times  Report about the London automobile show that opens October 16, 1930. The main focus of this article is Sir Dennistoun Burney's Streamline.
  • Sinsabaugh, Chris (January 31, 1932), The News From Detroit: Sir Dennistoun Burney's Streamlined Car With Motor in Read Interest Engineers - Expectations Growing, New York Times: Automobiles pg 1  "[T]he car would have an impressive gasoline economy performance, this was borne out by the record of twenty-one miles to the Imperial gallon. The car weights 4,400 pounds and has an 80-horsepower engine."

Used in T. O'Conor Sloane[edit]

  • Davis & Sanford (August 8 1940). "Dr. T.O'c. Sloane, Scientist, Author". The New York Times. p. 19.  Check date values in: |date= (help) Inventor of the Self-Recording Photometer for Gas Power Dies in South Orange. Wrote Technical Books. Ex-Associate Editor of Science and Invention Translated Foreign Works as Hobby .

Used in Traf-O-Data[edit]

  • Wallace, James; Jim Erickson (1992). Hard Drive: Bill Gates and the Making of the Microsoft Empire. John Wiley & Sons. pp. pg 42–46. ISBN 0-471-56886-4. 

Used in TV Typewriter[edit]

  • Freiberger, Paul; Michael Swaine (2000). Fire in the Valley: The Makine of the Personal Computer. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. pp. 35–36. ISBN 0-07-135892-7.  "A giant step toward the realization of the personal-computer dream happened in 1973, when Radio Electronics published an article by Don Lancaster that described a "TV Typewriter."
  • Lancaster, Don (September 1973). "TV Typewriter". Radio Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (9): 43–52. 
  • Ceruzzi, Paul E. (2003). A History of Modern Computing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. p. 226. ISBN 0-262-53203-4. "One influential project was the TV-Typewriter, designed by Don Lancaster and published in Radio-Electronics in September 1973."
  • Editors (November 1973). "TV Typewriter Notes and Comments". Radio Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (11): 16, 22. 
  • Lancaster, Don (December 1973). "TV Typewriter Corrections". Radio Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (12): 16, 22. 
  • Singer, Hal (Editor). (April 15, 1975). "Modifications for the TVT-1". Micro-8 Computer User Group Newsletter (Lompoc, CA: Cabrillo Computer Center) 1 (6): 27–33. 
  • Smith, Roger (February 1975). "UART and Modem for TV Typewriter". Radio-Electronics (Gernsback Publications) 46 (2): 51–53. 
  • Lancaster, Don (February 1973). "Low-Cost Keyboards". Radio Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (2): 54–57, 87,88. 
  • Lancaster, Don (February 1974). "Build Improved ASCII Encoder". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 45 (2): 27–31. 
  • Lancaster, Don (April 1974). "ASCII Keyboard and Encoder". Popular Electronics (Ziff Davis) 5 (2): 27–31. 
  • Freiberger, Paul; Michael Swaine (2000). Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 220. ISBN 0-07-135892-7.  "Computer enthusiasts relied on the hobbyist electronics magazines, such as Popular Electronics and Radio Electronics, to stay up on the latest technological developments."
  • Mims, Forrest M. (1986). Siliconnections: Coming of Age in the Electronics Era. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. p. 169. ISBN 0-07-0242411-X Check |isbn= value (help).  The Popular Electronics management decided to devote more space to audio and citizen's band radio to attract more advertisers. After Radio Electronics' success with the TV Typewriter and Mark 8 computer articles, Popular Electronics renewed the project article competition.
  • Art Salsberg (November 1982). "Editorial: Number One!". Computers & Electronics (Ziff Davis Publishing) 20 (11): 4.  "A survey of subscribers conducted last year confirmed again that the great majority of our readers are male (97%)..."
  • Roberts, H. Edward; William Yates (January 1975). "Altair 8800 minicomputer". Popular Electronics (New York: Ziff-Davis) 7 (1): 33–38.  The full page advertisement, "SWTPC is Proud to Announce the CT-1024 Terminal System", appeared on page 32. The Altair 8800 article started on page 33.
  • Lancaster, Don (1974). TTL Cookbook (First edition ed.). Indianapolis, IN: Howard W. Sams. ISBN 0-672-21035-5. 
  • Lancaster, Don (1976). TV Typewriter Cookbook (First edition ed.). Indianapolis, IN: Howard W. Sams. ISBN 0-672-21313-3. 
  • Lancaster, Don (1978). The Cheap Video Cookbook (First edition ed.). Indianapolis, IN: Howard W. Sams. ISBN 0-672-21524-1. 
  • Lancaster, Don (February 1973). "Low-Cost Keyboards". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (2): 54–57, 87–88. 
  • Lancaster, Don (April 1973). "ASCII Keyboard Encoder". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (4): 55–59. 
  • Lancaster, Don (September 1973). "TV Typewriter". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (9): 43–52. 
  • Editors (November 1973). "TV Typewriter Notes and Comments". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (11): 16, 22. 
  • Lancaster, Don (December 1973). "TV Typewriter Corrections". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 44 (12): 16, 22. 
  • Lancaster, Don (February 1974). "Build Improved ASCII Encoder". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 45 (2): 27–31. 
  • Lancaster, Don (April 1974). "ASCII Keyboard and Encoder". Popular Electronics (New York, NY: Ziff-Davis Publishing) 5 (2): 27–31. 
  • Smith, Roger (February 1975). "UART and Modem for TV Typewriter". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (2): 51–53. 
  • Colle, Ed (February 1975). "TV Typewriter II". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (2): 27–30. 
  • Colle, Ed (March 1975). "TV Typewriter II, Part 2". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (3): 56–58. 
  • Colle, Ed (April 1975). "TV Typewriter II, Part 3". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (4): 61–63, 86,87,90. 
  • Colle, Ed (September 1975). "TV Typewriter II Screen-read Board". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (9): 56,57,76,77. 
  • Colle, Ed (November 1975). "TV Typewriter II Manual Cursor Board". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 46 (11): 61–63, 86,87,90. 
  • Colle, Ed (April 1976). "Serial Interface For TVT II". Radio-Electronics (New York, NY: Gernsback Publications) 47 (4): 60–62, 80,81. 
  • Lancaster, Don (July 1977). "Build the TVT-6: A Low Cost Direct Video Display". Popular Electronics (New York, NY: Ziff-Davis Publishing) 12 (1): 47–52. 
  • Lancaster, Don (August 1977). "Build the TVT-6: Part II". Popular Electronics (New York, NY: Ziff-Davis Publishing) 12 (2): 49–54.  Has video software written in 6502 assembly language for the KIM-1 microcomputer.
  • Lancaster, Don (October 1977). "Hex to ASCII Converter for Your TVT-6". Popular Electronics (New York, NY: Ziff-Davis Publishing) 12 (4): 49–52. 
  • Lancaster, Don (September 1975). "Serial Interface". BYTE (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 1 (1): 22–37. 
  • Lancaster, Don (October 1975). "Television Interface". BYTE (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 1 (2): 20–33. 
  • Lancaster, Don (November 1975). "The In and Outs of Volatile Memories". BYTE (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 1 (3): 12–17. 
  • Lancaster, Don (December 1975). "Read Only Memory Technology". BYTE (Peterborough NH: Green Publishing) 1 (4): 64–69. 

Used in Ziff Davis[edit]

  • "William B. Ziff, 55, Publisher, Is Dead.". New York Times. December 21 1953. p. 31.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  • "William Bernard Ziff.", Dictionary of American Biography, Supplement 5: 1951-1955. American Council of Learned Societies, 1977. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale. 2007.
  • "Bernard G. Davis, Publisher, Dead.". New York Times. August 29 1972. p. 37.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  • "Bernard George Davis." Dictionary of American Biography, Supplement 9: 1971-1975. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1994. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale. 2007.
  • "Again, Mitchell". Time Magazine (Time). 10 June 1929. Retrieved 2007-08-26.  "Monthly magazine until this month called Popular Aviation and Aeronautics. With 100,000 circulation it is largest-selling of U. S. air publications." "Editor of Aeronautics is equally airwise Harley W. Mitchell, no relative of General Mitchell."
  • "Advertising News and Notes". New York Times. January 18 1938. p. 28.  Check date values in: |date= (help) "Ziff-Davis Publishing Company, New York and Chicago, has purchased Radio News Magazine and Amazing Stories."

Link on image size[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:Non-free_content/Archive_27#Proposed_rewording_of_WP:NFCC.233b