User:Talker26

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Talker26
Male.svg Talker26 is male.
He is 11.69 years old.
Flag of the Philippines.svg This user comes from the Philippines.
en This user is a native speaker of English.

I am user talker 26, and i'll give you a hint of what i like: ♠,♣, ←→ ♥,♦.

Entertainment[edit]

I always put things i like here.

Body Parts[edit]

Digestive system diagram en.svg Respiratory system complete en.svg 1. Human urinary system: 2. Kidney, 3. Renal pelvis, 4. Ureter, 5. Urinary bladder, 6. Urethra. (Left side with frontal section)7. Adrenal gland Vessels: 8. Renal artery and vein, 9. Inferior vena cava, 10. Abdominal aorta, 11. Common iliac artery and vein With transparency: 12. Liver, 13. Large intestine, 14. Pelvis Circulatory System en.svg Muscles anterior labeled.png Muscle posterior labeled.png TE-Nervous system diagram.svg

Human skeleton front en.svg
Human skeleton back en.svg
Male pelvic structures.svg

TE-Lymphatic system diagram.svg Skin.svg

Geologic time scale[edit]

Preceded by Proterozoic Eon 542 Ma - Phanerozoic Eon - Present
542 Ma - Paleozoic Era - 251 Ma 251 Ma - Mesozoic Era - 65 Ma 65 Ma - Cenozoic Era - Present
Cambrian Ordovician Silurian Devonian Carboniferous Permian Triassic Jurassic Cretaceous Paleogene Neogene Quaternary

Talker26Talker26Talker26

Preceded by Archean Eon Proterozoic Eon Followed by Phanerozoic Eon
Paleoproterozoic Era Mesoproterozoic Era Neoproterozoic Era
Siderian Rhyacian Orosirian Statherian Calymmian Ectasian Stenian Tonian Cryogenian Ediacaran
Archean Eon
Eoarchean Paleoarchean Mesoarchean Neoarchean
Hadean Eon
Cryptic Basin Groups Nectarian Lower Imbrian

Notes[edit]

Traditional fixed do[18]
Note name Syllable Pronunciation Pitch class
English Romance Italian Anglicized
C Do do /dɔ/ /doʊ/ 11
C Do 0
C Do 1
D Re re /rɛ/ /reɪ/ 1
D Re 2
D Re 3
E Mi mi /mi/ /miː/ 3
E Mi 4
E Mi 5
F Fa fa /fa/ /fɑː/ 4
F Fa 5
F Fa 6
G Sol sol /sɔl/ /soʊl/ 6
G Sol 7
G Sol 8
A La la /la/ /lɑː/ 8
A La 9
A La 10
B Si si /si/ /siː/ 10
B Si 11
B Si 0
Chromatic variants of fixed do
Note name Syllable Pitch class
English Romance Traditional
[18]
5 sharps / 5 flats
[18][19][20]
Hullah
[21]
Shearer
[22]
Siler
[23]
Sotorrio
[24]
Cdouble flat Dodouble flat do duf daw du (pe) 10
C Do du de do (tsi) 11
C Do do do do da do 0
C Do di da di de ga 1
Cdouble sharp Dodouble sharp das dai di (re) 2
Ddouble flat Redouble flat re raf raw ru (do) 0
D Re ra ra ra ro ga 1
D Re re re re ra Re 2
D Re ri ri ri re nu 3
Ddouble sharp Redouble sharp ris rai ri (mi) 4
Edouble flat Midouble flat mi mef maw mu (re) 2
E Mi me me me mo nu 3
E Mi mi mi mi ma mi 4
E Mi mis mai me (fa) 5
Edouble sharp Midouble sharp mish mi (jur) 6
Fdouble flat Fadouble flat fa fof faw fu (nu) 3
F Fa fo fe fo (mi) 4
F Fa fa fa fa fa Fa 5
F Fa fi fe fi fe jur 6
Fdouble sharp Fadouble sharp fes fai fi (sol) 7
Gdouble flat Soldouble flat sol sulf saw su (fa) 5
G Sol se sul se so jur 6
G Sol sol sol so sa sol 7
G Sol si sal si se ki 8
Gdouble sharp Soldouble sharp sals sai si (la) 9
Adouble flat Ladouble flat la lof law lu (sol) 7
A La le lo le lo ki 8
A La la la la la la 9
A La li le li le pe 10
Adouble sharp Ladouble sharp les lai li (tsi) 11
Bdouble flat Sidouble flat si sef taw tu (la) 9
B Si te se te to pe 10
B Si ti si ti ta tsi 11
B Si sis tai te (do) 0
Bdouble sharp Sidouble sharp sish ti (ga) 1
A dash ("–") means that the source(s) did not specify a syllable.

Order of the notes[edit]

The order of the notes go like this: Do4, Di4/Ra4, Re4, Ri4/Me4, Mi4, Fa4, Fi4/Se4, So4, Si4/Le4, La4, Li4/Te4, Ti4 & Do5.

Different note pitches[edit]
Scientific designation Helmholtz designation Octave name Frequency (Hz)
C-1 C͵͵͵ or ͵͵͵C Subsubcontra 8.176
C0 C͵͵ or ͵͵C Subcontra 16.352
C1 C͵ or ͵C Contra 32.703
C2 C Great 65.406
C3 c Small 130.813
C4 (Middle C) c′ One-lined 261.626
C5 c′′ Two-lined 523.251
C6 c′′′ Three-lined 1046.502
C7 c′′′′ Four-lined 2093.005
C8 c′′′′′ Five-lined 4186.009
C9 c′′′′′′ Six-lined 8372.018
Scientific designation Helmholtz designation Octave name Frequency (Hz)
D-1 D͵͵͵ or ͵͵͵D Subsubcontra 9.177
D0 D͵͵ or ͵͵D Subcontra 18.354
D1 D͵ or ͵D Contra 36.708
D2 D Great 73.416
D3 d Small 146.832
D4 (Middle D) d′ One-lined 293.665
D5 d′′ Two-lined 587.33
D6 d′′′ Three-lined 1174.659
D7 d′′′′ Four-lined 2349.318
D8 d′′′′′ Five-lined 4698.636
D9 d′′′′′′ Six-lined 9397.273
Scientific designation Helmholtz designation Octave name Frequency (Hz)
E-1 E͵͵͵ or ͵͵͵E Subsubcontra 10.301
E0 E͵͵ or ͵͵E Subcontra 20.602
E1 E͵ or ͵E Contra 41.204
E2 E Great 82.407
E3 e Small 164.814
E4 (Middle E) e′ One-lined 329.628
E5 e′′ Two-lined 659.255
E6 e′′′ Three-lined 1318.51
E7 e′′′′ Four-lined 2637.021
E8 e′′′′′ Five-lined 5274.041
E9 e′′′′′′ Six-lined 10548.082
Scientific designation Helmholtz designation Octave name Frequency (Hz)
F-1 F͵͵͵ Subsubcontra 10.913
F0 F͵͵ Subcontra 21.827
F1 Contra 43.654
F2 F Great 87.307
F3 f Small 174.614
F4 f′ One-lined 349.228
F5 f′′ Two-lined 698.457
F6 f′′′ Three-lined 1396.913
F7 f′′′′ Four-lined 2793.826
F8 f′′′′′ Five-lined 5587.652
F9 f′′′′′′ Six-lined 11175.303
Scientific designation Helmholtz designation Octave name Frequency (Hz)
G-1 G͵͵͵ or ͵͵͵G Subsubcontra 12.25
G0 G͵͵ or ͵͵G Subcontra 24.5
G1 G͵ or ͵G Contra 48.999
G2 G Great 97.999
G3 g Small 195.998
G4 g′ One-lined 391.995
G5 g′′ Two-lined 783.991
G6 g′′′ Three-lined 1567.982
G7 g′′′′ Four-lined 3135.964
G8 g′′′′′ Five-lined 6271.927
G9 g′′′′′′ Six-lined 12543.854

Sounds & pictures[edit]

Middle C About this sound Play .
Middle D About this sound Play .

Periodic Table[edit]

Periodic table
Group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Alkali metals Alkaline earth metals Pnicto­gens Chal­co­gens Halo­gens Noble gases
Period

1

Hydro­gen
1
He­lium
2
2
Lith­ium
3
Beryl­lium
4
Boron
5
Carbon
6
Nitro­gen
7
Oxy­gen
8
Fluor­ine
9
Neon
10
3
So­dium
11
Magne­sium
12
Alumin­ium
13
Sili­con
14
Phos­phorus
15
Sulfur
16
Chlor­ine
17
Argon
18
4
Potas­sium
19
Cal­cium
20
Scan­dium
21
Tita­nium
22
Vana­dium
23
Chrom­ium
24
Manga­nese
25
Iron
26
Cobalt
27
Nickel
28
Copper
29
Zinc
30
Gallium
31
Germa­nium
32
Arsenic
33
Sele­nium
34
Bromine
35
Kryp­ton
36
5
Rubid­ium
37
Stront­ium
38
Yttrium
39
Zirco­nium
40
Nio­bium
41
Molyb­denum
42
Tech­netium
43
Ruthe­nium
44
Rho­dium
45
Pallad­ium
46
Silver
47
Cad­mium
48
Indium
49
Tin
50
Anti­mony
51
Tellur­ium
52
Iodine
53
Xenon
54
6
Cae­sium
55
Ba­rium
56
1 asterisk
Lute­tium
71
Haf­nium
72
Tanta­lum
73
Tung­sten
74
Rhe­nium
75
Os­mium
76
Iridium
77
Plat­inum
78
Gold
79
Mer­cury
80
Thallium
81
Lead
82
Bis­muth
83
Polo­nium
84
Asta­tine
85
Radon
86
7
Fran­cium
87
Ra­dium
88
2 asterisks
Lawren­cium
103
Ruther­fordium
104
Dub­nium
105
Sea­borgium
106
Bohr­ium
107
Has­sium
108
Meit­nerium
109
Darm­stadtium
110
Roent­genium
111
Coper­nicium
112
Unun­trium
113
Flerov­ium
114
Unun­pentium
115
Liver­morium
116
Unun­septium
117
Unun­octium
118
1 asterisk
Lan­thanum
57
Cerium
58
Praseo­dymium
59
Neo­dymium
60
Prome­thium
61
Sama­rium
62
Europ­ium
63
Gadolin­ium
64
Ter­bium
65
Dyspro­sium
66
Hol­mium
67
Erbium
68
Thulium
69
Ytter­bium
70
 
2 asterisks
Actin­ium
89
Thor­ium
90
Protac­tinium
91
Ura­nium
92
Neptu­nium
93
Pluto­nium
94
Ameri­cium
95
Curium
96
Berkel­ium
97
Califor­nium
98
Einstei­nium
99
Fer­mium
100
Mende­levium
101
Nobel­ium
102
 

black=solid green=liquid red=gas grey=unknown Color of the atomic number shows state of matter (at 0 °C and 1 atm)
Primordial From decay Synthetic Border shows natural occurrence of the element
Background color shows subcategory in the metal–metalloid–nonmetal trend:
Metal Metalloid Nonmetal Unknown
chemical
properties
Alkali metal Alkaline earth metal Lan­thanide Actinide Transition metal Post-​transition metal Polyatomic nonmetal Diatomic nonmetal Noble gas

Category:Chemistry templates


G-Block
121
Ubu
122
Ubb
123
Ubt
124
Ubq
125
Ubp
126
Ubh
127
Ubs
128
Ubo
129
Ube
130
Utn
131
Utu
132
Utb
133
Utt
134
Utq
135
Utp
136
Uth
137
Uts
138
Uto
121
Usu
122
Usb
123
Ust

Elements[edit]

Colors and spectra (bottom row) of electric discharge in pure noble gases
Glass tube shining violet light with a wire wound over it Glass tube shining orange light with a wire wound over it Glass tube shining violet-blue light with a wire wound over it Glass tube shining white light with a wire wound over it Glass tube shining blue light with a wire wound over it
Glass tube shining red Glass tube shining red Glass tube shining red Glass tube shining red Glass tube shining red
Illuminated light red gas discharge tubes shaped as letters H and e Illuminated orange gas discharge tubes shaped as letters N and e Illuminated blue gas discharge tubes shaped as letters A and r Illuminated white gas discharge tubes shaped as letters K and r Illuminated violet gas discharge tubes shaped as letters X and e
Helium line spectrum Neon line spectrum Argon line spectrum Krypton line spectrum Xenon line spectrum
Helium Neon Argon
(with some Hg in the "Ar" image)
Krypton Xenon

Continents[edit]

I can't put Antarctica because there isn't one.

  1. ^ Paleontologists often refer to faunal stages rather than geologic (geological) periods. The stage nomenclature is quite complex. For an excellent time-ordered list of faunal stages, see "The Paleobiology Database". Retrieved 2006-03-19. 
  2. ^ a b Dates are slightly uncertain with differences of a few percent between various sources being common. This is largely due to uncertainties in radiometric dating and the problem that deposits suitable for radiometric dating seldom occur exactly at the places in the geologic column where they would be most useful. The dates and errors quoted above are according to the International Commission on Stratigraphy 2012 time scale. Where errors are not quoted, errors are less than the precision of the age given. Dates labeled with a * indicate boundaries where a Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point has been internationally agreed upon: see List of Global Boundary Stratotype Sections and Points for a complete list.
  3. ^ References to the "Post-Cambrian Supereon" are not universally accepted, and therefore must be considered unofficial.
  4. ^ Historically, the Cenozoic has been divided up into the Quaternary and Tertiary sub-eras, as well as the Neogene and Paleogene periods. The 2009 version of the ICS time chart recognizes a slightly extended Quaternary as well as the Paleogene and a truncated Neogene, the Tertiary having been demoted to informal status.
  5. ^ "NASA Scientists React to 400 ppm Carbon Milestone". Retrieved 2014-01-15 [1]
  6. ^ a b c d e f Royer, Dana L. (2006). "CO2-forced climate thresholds during the Phanerozoic" (PDF). Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 70 (23): 5665–75. Bibcode:2006GeCoA..70.5665R. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.11.031. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f For more information on this, see Atmosphere of Earth#Evolution of Earth's atmosphere, Carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, and Climate change. Specific graphs of reconstructed CO2 levels over the past ~550, 65, and 5 million years can be seen at File:Phanerozoic Carbon Dioxide.png, File:65 Myr Climate Change.png, File:Five Myr Climate Change.png, respectively.
  8. ^ The start time for the Holocene epoch is here given as 11,700 years ago. For further discussion of the dating of this epoch, see Holocene.
  9. ^ In North America, the Carboniferous is subdivided into Mississippian and Pennsylvanian Periods.
  10. ^ The Precambrian is also known as Cryptozoic.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n The Proterozoic, Archean and Hadean are often collectively referred to as the Precambrian Time or sometimes, also the Cryptozoic.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Defined by absolute age (Global Standard Stratigraphic Age).
  13. ^ The age of the oldest measurable craton, or continental crust, is dated to 3600–3800 Ma
  14. ^ Though commonly used, the Hadean is not a formal eon and no lower bound for the Archean and Eoarchean have been agreed upon. The Hadean has also sometimes been called the Priscoan or the Azoic. Sometimes, the Hadean can be found to be subdivided according to the lunar geologic timescale. These eras include the Cryptic and Basin Groups (which are subdivisions of the Pre-Nectarian era), Nectarian, and Early Imbrian units.
  15. ^ a b c d These unit names were taken from the lunar geologic timescale and refer to geologic events that did not occur on Earth. Their use for Earth geology is unofficial. Note that their start times do not dovetail perfectly with the later, terrestrially defined boundaries.
  16. ^ Bowring, Samuel A.; Williams, Ian S. (1999). "Priscoan (4.00–4.03 Ga) orthogneisses from northwestern Canada". Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology 134 (1): 3. Bibcode:1999CoMP..134....3B. doi:10.1007/s004100050465.  The oldest rock on Earth is the Acasta Gneiss, and it dates to 4.03 Ga, located in the Northwest Territories of Canada.
  17. ^ Geology.wisc.edu
  18. ^ a b c Demorest, Steven M. (2001). Building Choral Excellence: Teaching Sight-Singing in the Choral Rehearsal. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-19-512462-0. 
  19. ^ Benjamin, Thomas; Horvit, Michael; Nelson, Robert (2005). Music for Sight Singing (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thompson Schirmer. pp. x–xi. ISBN 978-0-534-62802-4. 
  20. ^ White, John D. (2002). Guidelines for College Teaching of Music Theory (2nd ed.). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. p. 34. ISBN 978-0-8108-4129-1. 
  21. ^ Hullah, John (1880). Hullah's Method of Teaching Singing (2nd ed.). London: Longmans, Green and Co. pp. xi–xv. 
  22. ^ Shearer, Aaron (1990). Learning the Classical Guitar, Part 2: Reading and Memorizing Music. Pacific, MO: Mel Bay. p. 209. ISBN 978-0-87166-855-4. 
  23. ^ Siler, H. (1956). "Toward an International Solfeggio". Journal of Research in Music Education 4 (1): 40–43. doi:10.2307/3343838. JSTOR 3343838.  edit
  24. ^ Sotorrio, José A (2002). Tone Spectra -and the Natural Elements of Music. (1st Ed) Spectral Music, 2002. (Presents a simple 12-tone Solfege: Do (Ga) Re (Nu) Mi Fa (Jer) Sol (Ki) La (Pe) and Tsi, a written compromise between "Ti" and "si".]