User:Three-quarter-ten

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¾-10
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Sciences humaines.svg This user loves knowledge.
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This user is proud
to be a Wikipedian.
Wikipedia-logo-en.png This user wastes far too much time editing Wikipedia, but needs to have at least some creative intellectual fun in life
hammer and anvil This user is a member of WikiProject Metalworking.
incl This user is an inclusionist.
xtens This user is a structurist.
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This user is an incrementalist such that his eventualism works toward inclusionism.
tick-tock This user is essentially an exopedian with some limited metapedian interests centered on epistemology, project sustainability, collegiality, and pie. However, his metapedian side is kept in check by lack of free time, which is probably healthier than the alternative anyway. This user believes that sometimes an exopedian has a metapedian side that's just been mugged by the clock.
101010 This user is not a bot but would like to become one someday.

I do pare down my watchlist on occasion. If I am unresponsive on an article talk page, it may be because I have stopped watching that article. In which case, if you want my attention, you can leave a note on my talk page. — ¾-10




  • Regarding political economy:
    • Welcome to reality.
    • Reality is a mixture of things.
      • Corollary: purist ideologies (left, right, or extraspectrum) are incomplete models of reality, and thus, in isolation, what they get wrong will eventually come to outweigh what they get right (once the externality concentrations on either side of the membrane shift to where the outward pumping is fighting too large an incoming tide). But start mashing them up, borrowing the good parts and discarding the bad, and now you're starting to get somewhere. Hint: the invisible hand by itself is an animal. It doesn't necessarily care who it bites, or how bad. But it's our animal, and it turns out that we can't live right without it. The trick is that we have to keep it under rein as our servant. We can't just cut it loose and let it make us its dinner. Wolf, or guide dog? Canine either way, but the devil is in the parameter values.
    • The first iteration that brought the pieces together. The ideas will be out there when the world is ready for them. The final two paragraphs before the refs put things into context (even though that early version of them did contain one conflation that has since been deconflated). As with many arguments in life, it eventually comes down to "you're both half right".
      • Those with grown-up attention spans will also want to read one of its references, this book, which explains in detail the reasoning behind the "past performance is no guarantee of future results" point of view.
      • You don't have to agree with Ford or with anyone else. The important thing is just to hear them out fully, and then do your own thinking.
      • What's interesting to me is that some of the new-market engineering ideas are ways to counteract economic stagnation or decline that are actually implementable starting from current reality (not just pipe dreams), whereas most other ideas that we've heard on that topic have tended to be more or less impractical to implement.

If you've read this far, you may also be interested in ...


My main content-area concentrations[edit]

  • Metalworking
  • The history of technology, especially industrial history. (Ironically, those are the content areas, but as for those articles themselves, I don't think I've ever touched them. Maybe later.)
  • Funny how you can't study the above without also taking on certain aspects of a history grad student and a business management grad student. As for the latter, you would almost think I cared or something. It seems that the reason we non-business-school-types have to care is that, to a great extent, our world is shaped and steered by business managers. (God help us.) It's not that they're not smart. For every PHB idiot, there's a truly smart manager. It's just that they tend to lack circumspection, integrity, and the motivation to balance long-term, broad interests against short-term, narrow ones. Which is where the academic disciplines of history and management science might help.

Contributions by me that I'm proud of[edit]

All of my contributions are worthwhile, but some of them merit a favorites list (roughly chronologic, newest at top):

Contributions by others that I'm proud of[edit]

These are too numerous to list, really, but here are a few that especially caught my eye or made me smile (roughly chronologic, newest at top):

Why Wikipedia is cool[edit]

  • It exists (it didn't used to)
  • It's generally excellent (more often than not)
  • It's fun to read and write (if you ask me)
  • It's robust (it's hard to break, it's hard to keep down, and it rolls with the punches)
  • It's stable, yet dynamic (like a healthy personality)
  • It's subject to continual improvement (like most products or services that want to stay on top)

Cool automated edits, and human-machine editing collaborations, that impressed me[edit]

In chronological order, newest at top.

Cool toolserver tools[edit]

There are probably hundreds of them that I am too ignorant to know about. But here are ones that I was happy to learn about:

Vandalism history of this page[edit]

I knew I was in love with Wikipedia forever when …[edit]

… I clicked through to "Abstraction" and read the hatnote

"This article is about the concept of abstraction in general."


<tattoo>WP 4eva   </tattoo> — ¾-10 05:27, 19 February 2010 (UTC)