User:Tom harrison

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Outline of the September 11 attacks

Category:Candidates for speedy deletion

[1]

September 9, 2014 The Twenty-Eight Pages By Lawrence Wright

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:WhatLinksHere/The_Zeitgeist_Movement

I did not know that[edit]

"Creamy snuff is a paste consisting of tobacco, clove oil, glycerin, spearmint, menthol, and camphor, and sold in a toothpaste tube. It is marketed mainly to women in India, and is known by the brand names IPCO (made by Asha Industries). According to the U.S NIH-sponsored Smokeless Tobacco Fact Sheet, it is marketed as a dentifrice."

Wake up, sheeple![edit]

Praise needed[edit]

We have

And naturally there's a category: Category:Criticism of individuals

Given the way Wikipedia works, it seems like there ought to be Criticism of my father. And why no Criticism of Adolf Hitler - or should it be Praise of Adolf Hitler? There are no articles in praise of individuals. Those with "praise of" in their titles are about works like The Praise of Folly. This is why: If someone wrote an article in praise of Mother Teresa, it would very quickly become one paragraph on "alleged charitable works" and four sections of criticism. But how about Praise of Voltaire? Or Praise of Galileo? Everyone loves Galileo. Someone start Praise of Galileo.

Sunday afternoon[edit]

The page of my enemy has been deleted[edit]

The page of my enemy has been deleted, and I am pleased.

The name is not the thing[edit]

"The proliferation of nominalizations in a discursive formation may be an indication of a tendency toward pomposity and abstraction."[1]

A dictionary is about words. An encyclopedia is about things. There is some overlap, but in general an article in Wikipedia is about the thing, not the term for the thing. It's fine and informative to tell our readers about word origins and usage. And some articles are indeed about words, so there is no bright line. But in general, it's better to start an article with "A whale is..." rather than "Whale is a term for..." Then in a later paragraph, tell the reader about the etymology of whale. You don't even have to say term. You can write ''whale'' and get it in italics. Then the reader will know you're talking about the word and not the thing.

Related to this is "refers to", which sounds like a convict sidling around the yard, talking out of the corner of his mouth, watching out for the bulls. Or maybe that's just me. Compare:

  • In painting, predella refers to the paintings or sculptures running along the frame at the bottom of an altarpiece.
  • In painting, the predella is the painting or sculpture along the frame at the bottom of an altarpiece.

Of course it could be worse. Predella could be the term that refers to the paintings.

Fringe theories evolve[edit]

"The builders of the ley system were very much in touch with the planet and its energies, therefore the only way to rediscover the ley system is to follow the energies on foot using divining rods - the way they were originally designed and built - very unscientific, yet a wealth of ancient knowledge is awaiting. For instance ley lines need not be straight, David Cowan in his book "Ley Lines and Earth Energies" shows the energies from a cup-marked stone are roughly circular with straight leys forming the shape. H. Miller and P. Broadhurst found that a "straight" ley across Southern England was actually two intertwining leys, the Michael and Mary lines. See www.ley-man.co.uk for a map of two circular leys, followed on foot."[2]

Socks, etc.[edit]

"Welcome to Britain, a home fit for shysters". the Guardian. 2012-08-05. Retrieved 2012-08-05. 

Bully boys[edit]

"The charter of Hamas - the Islamist party governing Gaza - asserts that the Freemasons are in league with the Jews and those unlikely bully boys - the Rotary Club - to undermine Palestine."[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Zombie Nouns". Opinionator. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  2. ^ "Why do people believe in secret cabals?". BBC. 2011-06-08. Retrieved 2012-04-23. 

External links[edit]